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Massimo Cristofanilli, MD

Contact Dr. Cristofanilli

925 Chestnut Street
Suite 320A
Philadelphia, PA 19107

(215) 955-8874

Medical School

University of La Sapienza, Rome, Italy - 1986

Residency

Cabrini Medical Center, New York

Fellowship

MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Board Certification

Medical Oncology
European Society for Medical Oncology

Hospital Appointment

Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
Methodist Hospital Division of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital

University Appointment

Professor of Medical Oncology
Director, Jefferson Breast Care Center

Research & Clinical Interests

Massimo Cristofanilli, M.D., FACP, an internationally renowned breast cancer researcher and clinician, has been appointed Director of the Jefferson Breast Care Center at the Kimmel Cancer Center (KCC) and Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals.

With more than 25 years of clinical, basic science and educational experience, Dr. Cristofanilli will also serve as Deputy Director of Translational Research at the KCC.

Dr. Cristofanilli is a widely-recognized leader in the translational research and treatment of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), the rare and aggressive form of breast cancer in which cancer cells block lymph vessels in the skin of the breast. Moreover, he has recognized expertise in the development of novel diagnostic and prognostic markers in primary and metastatic breast cancer (MBC).

Dr. Cristofanilli’s research aims to improve personalized medicine for breast cancer patients, focusing on molecular targeted agents, biomarkers and gene therapies, and bridging the gap between the bench and bedside in a more practical and smarter way. A forte of Dr. Cristofanilli is his team-based and multidisciplinary approach to medicine.

His 2004 study published in The New England Journal of Medicine on circulating tumor cells (CTCs)—found to be a predictor of progression-free survival and overall survival in MBC patients—sparked a slew of subsequent preclinical and clinical investigations that continue to further our knowledge and molecular understanding of the metastatic process with the potential to impact the treatment and improve the prognosis of these patients affected by recurrent disease.

Recently, he presented a study at the 2012 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on commercially-available genomic tests and their ability to better classify tumor subtypes in breast cancer to help guide treatment plans.