05B4 Wenger, David A - Thomas Jefferson University - Thomas Jefferson University
David A. Wenger
1C84
, PhD

David A. Wenger, PhD

Contact Dr. Wenger

1020 Locust Street
Room 394
Philadelphia, PA 19107

(215) 955-1666
(215) 955-9554 fax

Most Recent Peer-reviewed Publications

  1. Krabbe disease: Are certain mutations disease-causing only when specific polymorphisms are present or when inherited in trans with specific second mutations?
  2. Lysosomal storage diseases: Heterogeneous group of disorders
  3. Sixteen novel mutations in the arylsulfatase A gene causing metachromatic leukodystrophy
  4. Sphingomyelin lipidosis (Niemann-Pick Disease) in a juvenile raccoon (Procyon lotor)
  5. GM2 Gangliosidosis (B Variant) in Two Japanese Chins: Clinical, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pathological Characteristics
  6. Determination of psychosine concentration in dried blood spots from newborns that were identified via newborn screening to be at risk for Krabbe disease
  7. GM2 gangliosidosis associated with a HEXA missense mutation in Japanese Chin dogs: A potential model for Tay Sachs disease
  8. Metachromatic Leukodystrophy and Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy
  9. Extended normal life after AAVrh10-mediated gene therapy in the mouse model of krabbe disease
  10. Patient with unilateral white matter involvement does not have Krabbe disease
  11. Metachromatic leukodystrophy: A case of triplets with the late infantile variant and a systematic review of the literature
  12. Effects of treatments on inflammatory and apoptotic markers in the CNS of mice with globoid cell leukodystrophy
  13. The long-term outcomes of presymptomatic infants transplanted for Krabbe disease: Report of the workshop held on July 11 and 12, 2008, Holiday Valley, New York
  14. Significant correction of pathology in brains of twitcher mice following injection of genetically modified mouse neural progenitor cells
  15. Newborn Screening for Krabbe Disease: the New York State Model
  16. Sphingomyelinase deficiency (Niemann-Pick disease) in a Hereford calf
  17. Brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and neuromuscular pathology in a patient with GM1 gangliosidosis
  18. A single mutation in the GALC gene is responsible for the majority of late onset Krabbe disease patients in the Catania (Sicily, Italy) region.
  19. Stem cells act through multiple mechanisms to benefit mice with neurodegenerative metabolic disease
  20. Intrinsic resistance of neural stem cells to toxic metabolites may make them well suited for cell non-autonomous disorders: Evidence from a mouse model of Krabbe leukodystrophy
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