Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University

Center for Molecular Carcinogenesis

The Center for Molecular Carcinogenesis is composed of a multidisciplinary research team whose research efforts focuses on the study of initiation and progression of human cancers that are induced by environmental factors, such as metal carcinogens. Through this program, we will identify new mechanisms, biomarkers, and/or therapeutic targets for cancer prevention and treatment in the future. In parallel, we plan to develop a closely related program focused on the identification and validation of new therapeutic targets and biomarkers for acquired drug resistance of ovarian and lung cancers. Both of these programs will explore strategies to enhance understanding of the mechanisms that drive carcinogenesis at the molecular level and will leverage that newly gained understanding into the development of new oncology targets, cancer therapeutic strategies, and biomarkers.

Overall goals of this center are:

  • To foster collaborations and build research program synergy among scientists in Jefferson’s strategic programs, including cancer, cardiovascular disease and neuroscience.
  • To develop an unmatched, highly regarded multidisciplinary research team in molecular carcinogenesis to successfully compete for multiple PI R01 and other team grants in the near future.

For more information contact:
Bing-Hua Jiang, PhD
Director of the Center for Molecular Carcinogenesis
Professor, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology
Location: 1020 Locust Street, 336JAH, Philadelphia, PA 19107
Phone: 215-503-6147
 

Metal Carcinogenesis Program

Overview:
Humans are exposed to metals through a variety of occupational and non-occupational means (for example, smoking and underground water). Growing evidence has accumulated to show that prolonged exposure to high levels of metals is associated with cancer occurrence including lung, bladder, colon, and skin cancers. Metal exposure also causes cardiovascular and neurologic diseases. Much research effort has been placed on discovering potential mechanisms by which metals induce carcinogenesis and toxicity. Activation of signaling pathways is often observed in the process. However, the processes are complex and new molecular mechanisms of metal carcinogenesis and toxicity still remain to be elucidated. We plan to establish a working group to understand new mechanisms of metal induction of carcinogenesis and toxicity. The Center for Molecular Carcinogenesis will foster close collaborations and build synergies within the group to promote innovation, productivity, and success.

Goals:
We envision that members in this group will initiate collaborative projects and work together to successfully obtain multi-PI R01s and NIEHS training grants within the first two years. During the subsequent three to five years, the group will establish a track record of productive working relationships, demonstrating the evidence of synergy necessary to successfully pursue U01, P30 Center Program, and/or Superfund Research Program support (which supports 4-6 research projects and 3-6 core facilities).


Current Faculty:
Louise Fong, PhD, Associate Professor, Pathology, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology (R01)
Ling-Zhi Liu, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology (ACS Scholar grant)
Jay Schneider, PhD, Professor, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology (R01)
Jun He, PhD, Instructor, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology
Xin-Liang Ma, PhD, Professor, Department of Medicine (2 R01 grants)
Bing-Hua Jiang, PhD, Professor, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology (2 R01 grants)
Shey-Shing Sheu, PhD, Professor, Department of Medicine (2 R01 grants)

Molecular Determinants of Drug Resistance: Ovarian & Lung Cancer Program

Overview:
Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-associated death among women. Recent studies from our laboratories and others show that altered microRNA expression and oxidative stress are important in ovarian cancer development and therapeutic resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to microRNA dysregulation and high levels of oxidative stress remain to be elucidated. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Acquired resistance to drug and radiation treatments is a major challenge for many lung cancer therapeutic strategies. Similarly, new mechanisms of lung cancer resistance remain to be identified. We plan to establish a working group to investigate novel mechanisms of acquired resistance to drug and radiation treatments in both ovarian and lung cancers; and identify new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for overcoming treatment resistance in ovarian and lung cancer. The Center for Molecular Carcinogenesis will foster close collaborations and build synergies within the group to promote innovation and success.

Goals:
We expect that creation of the Center for Molecular Carcinogenesis will encourage and facilitate close collaboration among group members, and thus enable them to successfully compete for multi-PI R01 grants within the first two years. During the next three to five years, the additional objective would be to obtain U01, SPORE grant, and/or Research Program Project support for the center’s basic and clinical research in ovarian and/or lung cancer.

Current Faculty:
Stephen C Peiper, MD, Peter A. Herbut Professor and Chair, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology (R21)
Russell Schilder, MD, Professor, Department of Medical Oncology; Director, Gynecologic Oncology Program
Mark S Shahin, MD, Director, Hanjani Institute for Gynecologic Oncology, Abington, PA
Ralph G Zinner, MD, Professor, Department of Medical Oncology; Director, Thoracic/Aerodigestive Oncology Program
Zi-Xuan (Zoe) Wang, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology; Technical Director, Molecular Pathology Laboratory
Bo Lu, MD, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology (DOD grant/R21)
Adam P Dicker, MD, PhD, Professor and Chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Jun He, PhD, Instructor, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology
Ling-Zhi Liu, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology (ACS Scholar grant)
Hushan Yang, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Medical Oncology (ACS Scholar grant/R21)
Bing-Hua Jiang, PhD, Professor, Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology (2 R01 grants)