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Typical Curriculum

Year 1 (JMC 1)

Course descriptions for JMC Blocks can be found at JMC Course Catalog. MD/PhD-specific course descriptions follow, see Year 3.

Block I

  • Human Form and Development — ANAT. 105 August – October
  • Introduction to Clinical Medicine I (Full Year)
  • GC 710 — Current Topics in Translational Biomedical Research I (1 cr.) — Fall  

Block II

  • Molecular and Cellular Basis of Medicine — BOIC. 105 November – January

Block III & IV

  • The Systems — IDPT. 105 February – June
  • The Systems: Neuroscience — IDPT. 150
    • GC 712 — Current Topics in Translational Biomedical Research II (1 cr.) — Spring 1
  • GC 714 — Current Topics in Translational Biomedical Research III (1 cr.) — Spring 2
  • GC 930 — Research Rotation (10 cr.) — Summer

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Year 2 (JMC 2)

Course descriptions for JMC Blocks can be found at JMC Course Catalog

Block I

  • Foundations of Pathology and Pharmacology — IDPT. 200 August – September
  • Infection, Immunity and Disease — MICR. 201 September - November
  • Introduction to Clinical Medicine II — IDPT. 201 September - April
  • GC 710 — Current Topics in Translational Biomedical Research I (1 cr.) — Fall

Block II

  • Clinical Skills/Physical Diagnosis — IDPT. 204 November – May
  • Foundations of Clinical Medicine — IDPT. 202 November – May
  • Introduction to Clinical Medicine II — IDPT. 201 September – April
  • GC 712 — Current Topics in Translational Biomedical Research II (1 cr.) — Spring 1
  • GC 714 — Current Topics in Translational Biomedical Research III (1 cr.) — Spring 2
  • GC 930 — Research Rotation (10cr.) — Summer  

Successful completion on USMLE Step I prior to July 1

Special Notice for MD/PhD Candidates from the USMLE

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Year 3 (JGSBS 1)

A total of 70 credits are awarded for the first two years of regular medical school coursework, accounting for a substantial number of the credits required for the PhD thesis. In addition, 6 didactic credits and 20 research credits are awarded for MD/PhD specific coursework. Thus, MD/PhD students should be able to fulfill most remaining coursework early, providing significant time for bench research. Some courses are required of MD/PhD students in all PhD Programs and are listed below; other requirements are Program specific and listed with the appropriate PhD Program. As much of the remaining coursework as possible should be completed during JCGS1.

  • GC 550 D — Foundations in Biomedical Science, Tool Boxes (1 cr.) This course familiarizes the student with the powerful technologies used in scientific research.
  • GC 640 — Research Ethics (1 cr.) This graduate seminar course is designed to familiarize students with the ethical dilemmas inherent to the conduct of research. Topics to be discussed include codes of ethical behavior, research design, conflicts of interest, informed consent and the appropriate use of animals. The student will be required to prepare a paper on the analysis of one or more case studies.
  • GC 710, 712, 714 — Current Topics in Translational Biomedical Research (1 credit each, F, S1, S2) This course explores aspects of translational research and molecular medicine through the venues of Translational Research Journal Club, Progress in Translational Research Seminar, Ethics Case Conference and Case Studies in Molecular Medicine. Meets four (4) times per month.
  • GC 725 — Enrichment Course in Clinical Skills for Physician Scientists (1 credit each, F, S) During the first research year, students participate for one half day per month as teaching assistants in one or more medical school courses.

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Years 4 through 6 (JGSBS 2, 3, 4)

These years are devoted primarily to the completion of thesis research projects and completion of any additional elective or required advanced courses specialty. Students still register for MD/PhD specific courses.

  • GC 630 — Fundamentals of Clinical Trials (3 cr.) This course introduces the fundamentals of design and analysis of clinical trials. Some of the design issues discussed include specifying and operationalizing the scientific question of interest, the role of a control group randomization, blinding, and sample size determination. The course focuses on statistical aspects of the analysis of clinical trials, including various statistical estimation and testing procedures, the intent to treat principle, interim analysis, and statistical and scientific inference. Students learn to critically review published reports of clinical trials through participation in small group discussions and individual written critiques.
  • GC 710, 712, 714 — Current Topics in Translational Biomedical Research, I, II, III (1 cr. each) This course explores aspects of translational research and molecular medicine through the venues of Translational Research Journal Club, Progress in Translational Research Seminar, Ethics Case Conference and Case Studies in Molecular Medicine. Meets four (4) times per month.
  • GC 725 — Enrichment Course in Clinical Skills for Physician Scientists (1 cr. each, F, S) During these research years, the course is composed of two components: formal physical diagnosis rounds and morning report. Physical diagnosis rounds involve patients admitted to the medical services of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. These rounds also are attended by a small group of medical residents. On these rounds, trainees are exposed to a diverse group of patients where auscultatory, visual, and tactile skills are practiced. After rounds students attend morning report where case presentations are used to develop differential diagnosis skills. Each student is required to attend at least one session (physical diagnosis rounds and morning report) per month. Each week’s session is limited to three (3) students and sign up is required beforehand.
  • Rotation on the Cancer Clinical Research Review Committee (CCRRC) This committee of the Kimmel Cancer Center evaluates the scientific validity of patient-oriented studies in oncology at TJU. Rotation on this biweekly committee is an opportunity to obtain hands-on experience reviewing the scientific merit of clinical protocols. Trainees are supervised by Dr. SA Waldman, the Chairperson of the CCRRC, who guides analyses, addresses questions, and provides feedback. Trainees rotate on the CCRRC for six (6) one-hour meetings.
  • Critical Review of the Scientific Literature Rotation The Annals of Internal Medicine is the flagship publication of the Philadelphia-based American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine (ACP-ASIM). It is considered the premiere worldwide internal medicine journal. Editor Christine Laine, MD, MPH has offered members of the MD/PhD Program unprecedented access to the editorial process through a four-week rotation. Enrollees can participate in the weekly editorial and statistical meetings of the journal. Maximal benefit of the rotation is obtained when participants read a majority of the articles being discussed. Therefore, participants should schedule the rotation during a period when they have the time to devote to preparation for each session.

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Year 7 & 8 (JMC 3 and 4)

Course descriptions for JMC can be found at JMC Course Catalog

Schedule

The clinical curriculum starts in July after the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I and consists of 100 weeks as follows: 84 weeks of clerkship activity; two weeks of vacation during each December holiday period (total four); two weeks vacation in June; two weeks vacation immediately prior to graduation; eight weeks of vacation to be scheduled to fit the needs of the student.

  • MD/PhD students should return to JMC in July whenever possible but may request a delay of up to 3 months in order to complete their thesis research.

Course Requirements

JMC 3

  • Six weeks of Family Medicine (FAMED. 350)
  • Twelve weeks of General Surgery, Surgical and Medical Sub-specialties (SURG. 350)
  • Twelve weeks of Internal Medicine and Neurology (MED. 350)
  • Six weeks of Pediatrics (PED. 350)
  • Six weeks of Psychiatry and Human Behavior (PSYHB. 350)
  • Six weeks of Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN. 350)

JMC 4

  • Four weeks of Senior Medicine
  • Four weeks of Scientiļ¬c Foundations of Clinical Medicine or Advanced Basic Science (IDPT. 420)
  • Four weeks of Emergency Medicine/Advanced Clinical Skills (EMGR 400)
  • Four weeks of Inpatient Subinternship in either Family Medicine (FMED 402), Internal Medicine (MED 401), General Surgery (SURG 450) or Pediatrics (PED 402)
  • Four weeks of an Outpatient Subinternship in either Family Medicine (FMED 401 or FMED 406), Internal Medicine (MED 402), Obstetrics/Gynecology (OBGY 402), Pediatrics (PED 401), or Psychiatry and Human Behavior (PSYH 405 or PSYH 408)
  • Sixteen weeks of electives

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