Thomas Jefferson University

News & Events

  • How Does Prostate Cancer Form?
    Prostate cancer affects more than 23,000 men this year in the USA however the individual genes that initiate the formation are poorly understood. Finding an enzyme that regulates this process could provide excellent new prevention approaches.

  • Unpacking Brain Damage in ALS
    A new study published online today (December 17th) in the Cell Press journal Neuron shows that a common gene mutation in ALS generates a deadly protein that may cause the damage in the brain that leads to ALS.

  • Jefferson Named Best Radiologic Technologist Training Program
    At the RSNA’s 100th annual meeting in Chicago in December, the Department of Radiologic Sciences in Jefferson’s School of Health Professions, received top honors as Best Radiologic Technologist Training Program.

  • HIV Drug Blocks Bone Metastases in Prostate Cancer
    Although prostate cancer can be successfully treated in many men, when the disease metastasizes to the bone, it is eventually lethal. In a study published online December 1st in the journal Cancer Research, researchers show that the receptor CCR5 best known for its role in HIV therapy may also be involved in driving the spread of prostate cancer to the bone.

  • HR Wins Department of the Year Award
    Congratulations to the Department of Human Resources for winning the annual HR Department of the Year Award! Presented by the Delaware Valley HR Executive Alliance group, more than 450 HR executives gathered in the Crystal Tea Room on November 20, 2014, in anticipation to find out who won in various categories and for overall best department.

  • New Approach for Treating ALS
    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily kills motor neurons, leading to paralysis and death 2 to 5 years from diagnosis. Currently ALS has no cure. Despite promising early-stage research, the majority of drugs in development for ALS have failed. Now researchers have uncovered a possible explanation. In a study published November 20th in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, researchers show that the brain’s machinery for pumping out toxins is ratcheted up in ALS patients and that this machinery also pumps out medicine designed to treat ALS, thereby decreasing the therapeutic efficacy of the drug.

  • Fat a Culprit in Fibrotic Lung Damage
    Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It’s caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. Researchers debate whether the lung tissue is directly damaged, or whether immune cells initiate the scarring process – an important distinction when trying to find new ways to battle the disease. Now research shows that both processes may be important, and suggest a new direction for developing novel therapies.

  • Killing Cancer by Protecting Normal Cells
    Although radiation treatments have become much more refined in recent years, it remains a challenge to both sufficiently dose the tumor while sparing the surrounding tissue.

  • Novel Cancer Vaccine Approach for Brain Tumors
    Glioblastoma is the most common aggressive primary brain tumor, and despite advances in standard treatment, the median survival is about 15 months (compared to 4 months without treatment). Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University have been working on a cancer vaccine that would extend that survival by activating the patient’s immune system to fight the brain tumor.

  • Fighting for Cancer Patients