Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University

Jefferson Humanities & Health

Mike Natter, SKMC Class of 2017, "Neural Expressions," ink on paper, 2017
Mike Natter, SKMC Class of 2017, "Neural Expressions," ink on paper, 2017

Jefferson encourages student engagement in the arts and humanities in recognition of their capacity to foster essential skills related to healthcare including observation, critical thinking, self-reflection and empathy.

Each academic year, the Dr. Yoshihisa Asano Humanities & Health Series explores a thought-provoking theme from a broad range of perspectives, inviting consideration and action around urgent issues impacting how we improve lives. Series programs promote understanding of the social contexts of health and wellness, the lived experiences of diverse individuals and communities, and self-care for health professionals. During the 2017-2018 academic year, the Asano Humanities & Health Series investigates the theme Safety.

Throughout the year, series programs will explore dimensions of Safety, including:

  • Safety as a social privilege related to age, ability, gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation 
  • Inequities as causes of health vulnerabilities 
  • Burnout prevention for health professionals 
  • Creating safe spaces and supporting diversity of opinion 
  • Risk-taking in art, design and entrepreneurship 

Students are invited to complete the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending eight series events during the academic year and completing a portfolio of reflective response essays. Students who complete the certificate will be recognized during a Spring 2018 celebration.

Click here to learn more and register now for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate. 

Events below marked with an asterisk (*) may be counted toward the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate.  

Please note: Events are added to the calendar below as they are confirmed. Please check regularly for additional events. 

The Dr. Yoshihisa Asano Humanities & Health Series is named for Dr. Yoshihisa Asano, whose generous support enables Jefferson educational programs that advance humanism and compassionate care. 

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Megan.Voeller@jefferson.edu.  

Announcements and Ongoing Programs

Jefferson students can take advantage of student discounts and pay-as-you-wish programs at many Philadelphia cultural organizations, including theaters and museums. For a select list of such programs, click here and scroll to Arts & Humanities. 

Inside Out is an annual art and literary journal which showcases photography, paintings and sketches, short stories, poems and essays by Jefferson students. All Jefferson students are welcome to submit their work to future editions of Inside Out.

A call for submissions is issued in the fall of each year, but current students may submit material at any time during the year. Interested students can contact Dorissa Bolinski, the journal's staff advisor.

To view and download a PDF of the 2017 issue, click here

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health

Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch. 

PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

If you are interested in participating, please subscribe to our listserv: info@healthecologieslab.org

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Thomas Jefferson University, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. (One reading group meeting counts as one event.)

Schedule of Readings

September 18
Introduction: Why ‘Against Health’?
Jonathan M. Metzl  

What Is Health and How Do You Get It?
Richard Klein

September 25
Risky Bigness: On Obesity, Eating, and the Ambiguity of ‘Health’
Lauren Berlant

October 2
Against Global Health? Arbitrating Science, Non-Science, and Nonsense through Health
Vincanne Adams  

October 9
The Social Immorality of Health in the Gene Age: Race, Disability, and Inequality
Dorothy Roberts

October 16
Fat Panic and the New Morality
Kathleen LeBesco

October 23
Against Breastfeeding (Sometimes)
Joan B. Wolf  

October 30
Pharmaceutical Propaganda
Carl Elliott  

November 6
The Strangely Passive-Aggressive History of Passive-Aggressive Personality Disorder
Christopher Lane

November 13
Obsession: Against Mental Health
Lennard J. Davis

November 20
Atomic Health, or How The Bomb Altered American Notions of Death
Joseph Masco  

November 27
How Much Sex Is Healthy? The Pleasures of Asexuality
Eunjung Kim  

December 4
Be Prepared
S. Lochlann Jain

December 11
In the Name of Pain
Tobin Siebers

December 18
Conclusion: What Next?
Anna Kirkland

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line?  

The experience of poverty has far reaching implications, even impacting longterm health and survival. The faculty of the Jefferson College of Nursing will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Jefferson students from all disciplines are invited to participate.   

When can I participate?
Thursday, September 14, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Thursday, September 28, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Thursday, October 19, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

What’s in it for me as a student? 
A great experience with fellow students, pizza before the event, and a certificate of completion. (Include it in your resume/portfolio!)

How can I sign up?
Please use the links below to sign up (first-come basis, limited spots available):  

Thursday, September 14, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107
www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

Thursday, September 28, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107
www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

Thursday, October 19, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107
www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

Questions? Contact Karen Alexander, MSN, RN, Instructor, Jefferson College of Nursing, Karen.Alexander@jefferson.edu.  

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line?  

The experience of poverty has far reaching implications, even impacting longterm health and survival. The faculty of the Jefferson College of Nursing will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Jefferson students from all disciplines are invited to participate.  

 

When can I participate?

Thursday, September 14, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Thursday, September 28, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Thursday, October 19, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

 

What’s in it for me as a student?  

A great experience with fellow students, pizza before the event, and a certificate of completion. (Include it in your resume/portfolio!)

 

How can I sign up?

Please use the links below to sign up (first-come basis, limited spots available): 

 

Thursday, September 14, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

 

Thursday, September 28, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

 

Thursday, October 19, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

 

Questions? Contact Karen Alexander, MSN, RN, Instructor, Jefferson College of Nursing, Karen.Alexander@jefferson.edu. 

 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line?  

The experience of poverty has far reaching implications, even impacting longterm health and survival. The faculty of the Jefferson College of Nursing will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Jefferson students from all disciplines are invited to participate.  

 

When can I participate?

Thursday, September 14, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Thursday, September 28, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Thursday, October 19, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

 

What’s in it for me as a student?  

A great experience with fellow students, pizza before the event, and a certificate of completion. (Include it in your resume/portfolio!)

 

How can I sign up?

Please use the links below to sign up (first-come basis, limited spots available): 

 

Thursday, September 14, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

 

Thursday, September 28, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

 

Thursday, October 19, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

 

Questions? Contact Karen Alexander, MSN, RN, Instructor, Jefferson College of Nursing, Karen.Alexander@jefferson.edu. 

 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line?  

The experience of poverty has far reaching implications, even impacting longterm health and survival. The faculty of the Jefferson College of Nursing will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Jefferson students from all disciplines are invited to participate.  

 

When can I participate?

Thursday, September 14, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Thursday, September 28, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Thursday, October 19, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

 

What’s in it for me as a student?  

A great experience with fellow students, pizza before the event, and a certificate of completion. (Include it in your resume/portfolio!)

 

How can I sign up?

Please use the links below to sign up (first-come basis, limited spots available): 

 

Thursday, September 14, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

 

Thursday, September 28, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

 

Thursday, October 19, 12-2:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

www.SignUpGenius.com/go/30E044FACAD23A7FE3-poverty2

 

Questions? Contact Karen Alexander, MSN, RN, Instructor, Jefferson College of Nursing, Karen.Alexander@jefferson.edu. 

 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

The Empathy Project, a collaboration between Jefferson and Lantern Theater Company, seeks to foster empathy and tolerance for ambiguity among health professions students using the tools and techniques of the theatrical form. Through performance exercises, adaptation, and collaboration, we challenge students to engage with characters possessing a variety of backgrounds and viewpoints, while simultaneously asking students to work with an eye toward the audiences for the stories they tell.

Each year, Lantern teaching artists lead a group of Jefferson students and health professionals through a series of workshops designed to introduce them to the theatrical form, explore the basic tools of actors and playwrights, and guide participants through the writing and staging of original short plays. The program culminates in a live presentation of selected plays written by participants, performed by an ensemble of Lantern artists and program participants for an audience of students, staff and community members.

Participants have praised the program for its adaptation of theatrical tools to the practices of clinical observation and diagnosis, as well as for engendering greater empathy for their patients and colleagues.

Class Dates, Times and Locations

Fall 2017
Mon., Oct. 2, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 408
Mon., Oct. 9, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308
Mon., Oct. 16, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308
Mon., Nov. 6, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308
Mon., Nov. 13, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308
Mon., Nov. 27, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308
Mon., Dec. 4, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308
Mon., Dec. 11, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308  

Spring 2018
Mon., Jan. 22, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308
Mon., Jan. 29, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308 
Mon., Feb. 5, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 408 
Mon., Feb. 12, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308 
Mon., Feb. 26, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308
Mon., Mar. 5, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 308
Mon., Mar. 19, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 408
Mon., Mar. 26, 7-9 p.m. - Hamilton 408  

More about The Empathy Project

Empathy experiment takes doctors, students out of the 'surgical theater' and into the actual theater.
The Pulse, Newsworks.org, April 30, 2015

All the World’s a Stage, Even the Med School Classroom, Jefferson News, May 10, 2015

Operating Theater: When doctors do drama “The Empathy Project” turns med students into playwrights.
Philly Voice, May 27, 2016

Feedback from previous Jefferson participants
“After the first few theater classes, I realized that I started perceiving patients differently during my hospital affiliate visits. I was thinking about them much like you would think about a character in a play.  It was an exciting thing to notice, and something that I hope will make me a good doctor.”

“It pushed me beyond my comfort zone so that I could learn new ways of observing and seeing through improv and acting exercises, scene writing, focused listening, and building a sense of community based on sharing ideas, experiences, and feelings.  We developed an emotional intimacy that would never have happened otherwise in the usual reserved professional medical environment. From hearing the stories and writings of fellow participants, I could feel my level of compassion growing, not only for others, but for myself as well. The theatre program was a very healing experience.”

“I can never forget how freeing it was to learn that everyone in our class felt as behind as I did (regardless of whether they were or not). It’s one thing to discuss with friends, who can be very much like you in habits and temperament; it’s another to hear classmates you don’t know as well say so.”

“I think the process of writing and acting helped me process a lot of the hurt and pain I see every day in the hospital. It also helped me feel good about the work I do and gave me permission to simply be me."

“In sitting down to think on my experience with this program, so many thoughts come to mind. Most recently, walking back into the hospital after a long stretch of classroom months, walking through the halls, smelling the way the floors smell and hearing the telemetry alarms buzz and ring, seeing again what it's like to be sick and to be a nurse or a doctor and be sick of one's job, I think I had the unique opportunity to almost experience it for the first time, again. It felt so foreign to me. It felt like a strange place. And of all the thoughts I had in contemplation, this was the most bright and pressing. I'm sure many moments helped me to feel this way, but I think participation in this theater program helped me to feel a little less like a medical student, and a little more like a human being again.  And that's a very good thing.”

Registration
The program is free and open to all Jefferson students, residents, faculty and staff. Pre-registration is required. To sign up, contact Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu

 

September

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A

Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Sept 18 
Introduction: Why ‘Against Health’? 
Jonathan M. Metzl 

What Is Health and How Do You Get It? 
Richard Klein

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch. 

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listserv: info@healthecologieslab.org
Questions about participating? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Opera Philadelphia: We Shall Not Be Moved

Monday, September 18 & Thursday September 21
8 - 10:30 p.m.
Wilma Theater
265 South Broad Street
operaphila.org

Please note: Jefferson students may register for one free ticket for either the Monday or Thursday performance. Registration via Eventbrite opens on Aug. 14. 

Register here for Monday, Sept. 18 tickets: https://weshallnotbemoved0918.eventbrite.com

Register here for Thursday, Sept. 21 tickets: https://weshallnotbemoved0921.eventbrite.com

A fusion of disciplines and genres, the score of We Shall Not Be Moved blends funk, rock, hip-hop, and classical music into a vital, experiential sonic form. This timely exploration of past and present struggles combines spoken word, contemporary movement, video projection, classical, R&B and jazz singing, and a brooding, often joyful score filled with place, purpose, and possibility.

On the run after a series of tragic incidents, five North Philly teens find refuge in an abandoned, condemned house in West Philadelphia at the exact location that served as headquarters of the MOVE organization, where a 1985 standoff with police ended with a neighborhood destroyed and 11 people dead, including five children. This self-defined family is assuaged and even inspired by the ghosts who inhabit this home and begin to see their squatting as a matter of destiny. A world premiere chamber opera by Daniel Bernard Roumain, librettist Marc Bamuthi Joseph, and celebrated director, choreographer, dramaturge and dancer Bill T. Jones.

Source: Opera Philadelphia

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A

Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Sept 25 
Risky Bigness: On Obesity, Eating, and the Ambiguity of ‘Health’ 
Lauren Berlant

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch. 

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org
Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

October

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A

Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Oct 2 
Against Global Health? Arbitrating Science, Non-Science, and Nonsense through Health 
Vincanne Adams 

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch. 

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org
Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Creative Approaches to Self-Care
Mon., Oct. 2, 5-7 p.m.
Topic: Transforming Mental and Emotional States

Pre-registration is required. Register HERE starting Tues., Sept. 5.   

In order to effectively care for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This monthly interdisciplinary workshop series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including grounding and relaxation techniques, finding balance, transforming negative emotions, challenging perfectionism and developing self-compassion. A light dinner will be provided at the beginning of each workshop. 

Instructors: Peggy Tileston, MA, MT-BC; Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Hartwell, MA, BC-DMT, LPC

When life gets stressful and the pressures of school, work and home life are piling up, it’s easy to get stuck in negative emotions and self-defeating thoughts. This workshop will utilize movement, music and laughter yoga to break up mental and emotional stuck points and introduce new ways of rejuvenating your spirit.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

MEDstudio@JEFF Graphic Medicine: Film + Panel Discussion 

Thurs., Oct. 5, 7-9 p.m. 

Hamilton Building, Connelly Auditorium

MEDstudio@JEFF works to uncover a new field of research, practice and education at the confluence of creativity and medicine to increase empathy among health care professionals, patients and the community. 

Graphic Medicine investigates the uniquely effective and authentic ways that drawing graphic narratives can communicate complex ideas, feelings and experiences between people. The program is one that creates dialog between health care professionals, patients and the community to generate bi-directional, shared understanding. Our purpose at MEDstudio@JEFF is to develop more empathetic medical practitioners who employ visual narrative to address subtle or difficult patient concerns, language barriers or anything that would otherwise not be evident. Although we live in an overwhelmingly visual culture, orienting yourself to think and work visually is another matter. 

In this event, we will enjoy a screening of Tom Judd’s documentary, Chalkboard Chronicles, which details the collaborative journey of twelve artists as they express complex memories of past experience through drawing on chalkboards installed in a gallery window. A panel discussion will follow the screening including MEDstudio@JEFF, Tom Judd, Philabundance, Mural Arts Philadelphia and others. This event also marks the launch the Graphic Medicine + Chalkboard Chronicles residency: Ten days of drawing hunger in the Delaware Valley on a large chalkboard at the DesignPhiladelphia headquarters on 10th and Locust Streets.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Jefferson Night at The Philadelphia Orchestra

Season Kick-Off, Yannick & Emmanuel Ax
Sat., Oct. 7, private reception at 6:30 p.m., concert at 8 p.m.

Verizon Hall, Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, Broad Street and Spruce Street

Mix and mingle with fellow Jefferson students, faculty and staff during an evening at The Philadelphia Orchestra.

Guest pianist Emanuel Ax performs Mozart’s final piano concerto, and Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Dvorák's Othello Overture and Tchaikovsky's Fourth Symphony. During a private pre-concert reception in the Orchestra’s Green Room, join principal tuba Carol Jantsch for a conversation about understanding anatomy as a brass instrumentalist.

Praised by the Philadelphia Inquirer as having “a sound as clear and sure as it [is] luxurious,” Carol Jantsch has been principal tuba of The Philadelphia Orchestra since 2006. She won the position during her senior year at the University of Michigan, becoming the first female tuba player in a major symphony orchestra. In addition to her duties in The Philadelphia Orchestra, Ms. Jantsch is a renowned tuba soloist and an in-demand teacher worldwide.

Students, register here for free tickets to the concert and reception, starting September 8: https://jeffersonatphiladelphiaorchestra.eventbrite.com

Faculty/staff, use discount code TJUnight for up to 30% tickets off at philorch.org. (Orchestra 1 and Tier 1 are the only two sections excluded from the promo code.)

6:30 p.m. - Private pre-concert reception with principal tuba Carol Jantsch
8 p.m. - Concert at Verizon Hall, Kimmel Center for Performing Arts
Yannick Nézet-Séguin
 - Conductor
Emanuel Ax
 - Piano

PROGRAM
Dvorák - Othello, concert overture, Op. 93
Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 27 in B-flat major, K. 595
INTERMISSION
Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36

**Important note** In the event that you can no longer attend the performance, please inform the Office of Student Life and Engagement so your space may be made available to another student. Any cancellations after 5 p.m. one day prior or no shows will result in a $25 hold attached to your student account.

For more information, please contact the Office of Student Life & Engagement at 215-503-7743 or StudentLife@jefferson.edu.

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health

Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A

Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Oct 9 
The Social Immorality of Health in the Gene Age: Race, Disability, and Inequality 
Dorothy Roberts

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch. 

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org
Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

October 10, 12-1 p.m., JAH Eakins Lounge 

Klinefelter Trio:  A Touch of Spain

Join us for a free concert and lunch (first come, first served) at the Dean’s Concert Series! The influence of Spain has been felt in jazz throughout its history, from Jelly Roll Morton to Chick Corea, from New Orleans to Cuba, Puerto Rico and beyond. Featuring iconic rhythms such as the habanera, as well as the rich melodic language for which Spain is known, this trio will explore some well-known staples from this tradition, as well as some lesser known gems. The group features husband/wife duo, Terry and Paul Klinefelter, on piano and bass, with the always soulful and lyrical John Swana on valve trombone and EVI (electronic valve instrument). Open to all Jefferson students. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A

Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Oct 16 
Fat Panic and the New Morality 
Kathleen LeBesco

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch. 

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org
Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Mural Arts Tour: Mural Mile and Monument Lab

Sat., Oct. 21, 12-2 p.m.
Tour start: NW corner of 10th and Locust Streets, Tour end: Rittenhouse Square
Pre-registration required. Register here, starting Sept. 15:
https://jeffersonmuraltour.eventbrite.com

Get to know Philadelphia’s expansive mural collection on a guided tour with Mural Arts, the nation’s largest public art program. Stroll through Center City and discover stunning murals that reflect a variety of themes and artistic processes, and be inspired by the incredible creations that make Philly the mural capital of the world. This special tour will include parts of Monument Lab, a temporary public art and history project that asks artists to respond to the question: What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? 

The tour will conclude at Rittenhouse Square, where free public programs associated with Monument Lab will continue until 4 p.m.

About Mural Arts:
Mural Arts Philadelphia is the nation’s largest public art program, dedicated to the belief that art ignites change.

For 30 years, Mural Arts has united artists and communities through a collaborative process, rooted in the traditions of mural-making, to create art that transforms public spaces and individual lives. Mural Arts engages communities in 50–100 public art projects each year, and maintains its growing collection through a restoration initiative. Core Mural Arts programs such as Art Education, Restorative Justice, and Porch Light yield unique, project-based learning opportunities for thousands of youth and adults. (Source: MuralArts.org)

About Monument Lab:
Monument Lab
, coming to Philadelphia in fall 2017, is a public art and history project produced by Mural Arts Philadelphia. The project, taking place over nine weeks between September 16 and November 19, challenges people to join a citywide conversation about history, memory, and our collective future.

A guiding, central question—What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia?—will be posed to 21 of the most dynamic contemporary artists working in Philadelphia and around the world today, selected by curators Paul Farber and Ken Lum. Temporary monuments conceived by the artists will appear in public spaces across the city, accompanied by interactive pop-up “laboratories” for creative conversations and research collected by youth art guides. (Source: MuralArts.org)

 

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A

Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Oct 23 
Against Breastfeeding (Sometimes) 
Joan B. Wolf 

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch. 

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org
Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A

Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Oct 30 
Pharmaceutical Propaganda 
Carl Elliott 

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch. 

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org
Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

October 31, 12-1 p.m., JAH Eakins Lounge 

The Franklin Quartet
Strum und Drang: The Goethe Connection

Join us for a free concert and lunch (first come, first served) at the Dean’s Concert Series! The Sturm und Drang movement (1760s-1780s), with Goethe in the forefront, came to be associated with literature or music aimed at shocking the audience and moving them to extremes of emotion. The principal drive of the movement was rebellion against the constraint and rational ideals of the Enlightenment. In the “Goethe Connection: Sturm und Drang in string quartets by Haydn, Mendelssohn, Kraus and Vanhal,” the Franklin Quartet explores the composers’ embrace of this ethos. Open to all Jefferson students.  

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Wellness Week Keynote Lecture by Mick Krasner, MD

Exploring Resilience for Health Professionals: What We Know, and What We Can Do  

Mon., Oct. 30, 5-6:30 p.m., Atrium, Jefferson Alumni Hall

During this session Dr. Krasner will explore the threats to health professional well-being, and its effects on not only quality of care but the quality of caring within the healthcare dynamic. Building on his work and the work of colleagues, the capacity for cultivating resilience in the face of challenges facing health professionals will be examined, highlighting Mindful Practice. Participants will be given an opportunity to investigate together, through the sharing of clinically relevant personal narratives and the use of appreciative inquiry, the power of Mindful Practice, and investigate how practices like this and others can be brought into the daily lives of health professionals.

Dr. Mick Krasner, MD, FACP, Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, practices primary care internal medicine in Rochester, New York and co-directs the Mindful Practice programs at the University of Rochester.  Dr. Krasner has been teaching Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction to patients, medical students, and health professionals for more than 13 years, involving nearly 1600 participants, including over 500 health professionals. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

November

Story Slam: Resilience in Healthcare

Thurs., Nov. 2, 5-6:30 p.m., Atrium, Jefferson Alumni Hall

Jefferson clinicians share stories that address the critical balance for health professionals between the profound meaning and joy that come with providing care and the necessity for resilience in response to the stresses of caregiving. Story Slams involve a series of speakers presenting five-minute stories that revolve around a particular theme. This interdisciplinary event will showcase perspectives from a variety of health professions. Presenters to be announced. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A
Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Nov 6
The Strangely Passive-Aggressive History of Passive-Aggressive Personality Disorder
Christopher Lane

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch. 

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Creative Approaches to Self-Care
Mon., Nov. 6, 5-7 p.m.
Topic: From Self-Criticism to Self-Compassion

Pre-registration is required. Register HERE starting Mon., Oct. 9.   

In order to effectively care for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This monthly interdisciplinary workshop series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including grounding and relaxation techniques, finding balance, transforming negative emotions, challenging perfectionism and developing self-compassion. A light dinner will be provided at the beginning of each workshop. 

Instructors: Peggy Tileston, MA, MT-BC; Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Hartwell, MA, BC-DMT, LPC

We all have inner critics that compare how we are with how we think we should be. While this tendency to judge and evaluate ourselves can be a source of motivation, it can also undermine our sense of self-worth and make us feel “not good enough” in many areas of our lives. This workshop will focus on how to shift from viewing yourself through a lens of criticism to a lens of compassion. We will utilize art and movement to challenge perfectionism and promote self-acceptance.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Roxane Gay: Hunger

Fri., Nov. 10, 7-8:30 p.m.; location to be announced

Join us for an evening with New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay, who will discuss her newest book, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body. 

Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Gay explores the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she casts an insightful and critical eye on her childhood, teens, and twenties—including the devastating act of sexual assault that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers into the present and the realities, pains, and joys of her daily life. Gay is also the author of Bad Feminist and Difficult Women.

Roxane Gay’s writing appears in Best American Mystery Stories 2014Best American Short Stories 2012Best Sex Writing 2012A Public SpaceMcSweeney’sTin HouseOxford AmericanAmerican Short FictionVirginia Quarterly Review, and many others. She is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times. She is the author of the books AyitiAn Untamed State, the New York Times bestselling Bad Feminist, the nationally bestselling Difficult Women and the New York Times bestselling Hunger. She is also the author of World of Wakanda for Marvel. She has several books forthcoming and is also at work on television and film projects.

(Source: Harper and Roxanegay.com

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Theater of Witness: Walk In My Shoes

Sat., Nov. 11, 8-10 p.m.

Painted Bride Art Center, 230 Vine Street, paintedbride.org

Pre-registration required: https://walkinmyshoes-nov11.eventbrite.com

Theater of Witness is a unique form of testimonial theater that engages people who have experienced trauma, marginalization and oppression in their lives to craft and share stories about their experiences. Walk in My Shoes is a Theater of Witness piece created and performed by police and community members exploring societal wounds and sharing their stories and visions for the future. Scripted and directed by Theater of Witness Artistic Director Teya Sepinuck directly from the words and experiences of the performers, the piece is collaboration with Philadelphia Police Inspector Altovise Love-Craighead, and composer Jay Fluellen. Walk in my Shoes reveals the poignant and provocative stories of how race, poverty, trauma, inequality, power, abuse, safety, heroism, and injustice intersect in the lives of both police and community members. (Source: Theater of Witness)

Theater of Witness Artistic Director Teya Sepinuck will give a public talk about her work at Jefferson on Wednesday, November 15, 7 p.m. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A
Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Nov 13
Obsession: Against Mental Health
Lennard J. Davis

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch.  

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

November 14, 12-1 p.m., JAH Eakins Lounge 

Brian Ganz

Join us for a free concert and lunch (first come, first served) at the Dean’s Concert Series! More information to be announced. 

Theater of Witness: The Heart and Soul of Story
Weds., Nov. 15, 7-8:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107 

Optional registration: https://jefferson-heartandsoulofstory.eventbrite.com

Join Teya Sepinuck, Founder and Artistic Director of Theater of Witness, for an inspiring multi-media program of films and life stories from her work creating original testimonial theater with people who have lived through trauma, marginalization and/or oppression. This work with survivors of violence, war, prison and resettlement illuminates the healing power of deep listening, giving voice and “finding the medicine” in stories of struggle, injustice and transformation.

Teya will speak personally about the power of bearing witness and using personal and collective story to inspire healing, empathy and peace-building for both performers and audiences. 

Teya is currently collaborating with Jefferson and ARTZ Philadelphia on an innovative two-year project called HeART Stories: Building Empathy Through the Arts.

This event is free and open to the public. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A
Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Nov 20
Atomic Health, or How The Bomb Altered American Notions of Death
Joseph Masco  

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch.  

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A
Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Nov 27
How Much Sex Is Healthy? The Pleasures of Asexuality
Eunjung Kim  

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch.  

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

December

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A
Please note: PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Dec 4
Be Prepared
S. Lochlann Jain

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch.  

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Creative Approaches to Self-Care
Mon., Dec. 4, 5-7 p.m.
Topic: Creating Change

Pre-registration is required. Register HERE starting Mon., Nov. 13.   

In order to effectively care for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This monthly interdisciplinary workshop series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including grounding and relaxation techniques, finding balance, transforming negative emotions, challenging perfectionism and developing self-compassion. A light dinner will be provided at the beginning of each workshop. 

Instructors: Peggy Tileston, MA, MT-BC; Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Hartwell, MA, BC-DMT, LPC

In this art and movement based workshop, we will focus on creating change in your life. We will guide you through a process of identifying something you are working on changing in your life, assessing where you are in relation to that change, envisioning where you want to be and creating concrete steps to move you toward your goal. Special emphasis will be placed on how to overcome obstacles that you anticipate facing on your journey.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A
Please note:
 PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Dec 11
In the Name of Pain
Tobin Siebers

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch.  

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson Humanities and Health
Mondays 12-1 p.m., September 18-December 18, 2017
Location: Scott Memorial Library Room 200A
Please note:
 PDF copies of the readings may be downloaded from the Health Ecologies Lab website: http://healthecologieslab.org/initiatives/reading-group-at-jefferson

Dec 18
Conclusion: What Next?
Anna Kirkland

Jefferson Humanities and Health and the Health Ecologies Lab at the University of Pennsylvania are excited to offer a reading group to students, faculty, staff and community members. We will gather weekly to think critically about health as it is understood across disciplines, institutions, and social systems in order to envision new ecologies of health.

The reading group offers an informal learning environment, facilitated by participants from the humanities, social policy and health disciplines. This semester we will be reading 'Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality' (2010), a collection of essays edited by Jonathan M. Metzl and Anna Kirkland that examine the politics of health. Topics include our relationship to food, race, disability, mental health, sexuality, and more.

All are welcome. Lunch provided on a first-come, first-serve basis; please feel free to bring your own lunch.  

If you are interested, please subscribe to our listerv: info@healthecologieslab.org

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, megan.voeller@jefferson.edu.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.