Thomas Jefferson University

Jefferson Registrar Information

Jefferson - East Falls Campus

For information more specific to the Jefferson - East Falls Campus, please visit their University Registrar homepage. 

Degree Verification

Please contact the University Office of the Registrar (see contact information below) if you need an Official Letter of Degree Verification. Please make your request in writing by including Name, SSN, campus key, Date of Birth, any prior names used while in attendance, College, degree conferred, department, program, and enrollment dates, and date degree was awarded.

If you need a letter stating that you have completed all degree requirements but have not yet been officially awarded your degree, please send a written request to the University Office of the Registrar. Please be sure to include Name, SSN, campus key, Date of Birth, any prior names used while in attendance, College, degree to be conferred, department, program, and enrollment dates, and the anticipated date degree is to be awarded.

Please direct all requests to the Office of the Registrar:

University.Registrar@jefferson.edu
Monday-Friday - 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

(215) 503-8734

Ordering Transcripts

Students must order transcripts according to their Campus Location.

Thomas Jefferson University (East Falls Campus)

For questions please contact the East Falls Registrar's Office:
Telephone: (215) 951-2990 or email Registrar@PhilaU.edu

Thomas Jefferson University (Center City Campus) & Abington Memorial Hospital Dixon School of Nursing

To further enhance services to Jefferson and Abington Memorial Hospital Dixon School of Nursing students and alumni, Thomas Jefferson University has authorized the National Student Clearinghouse to provide transcript ordering privileges via the web, using any major credit card. (Your card will only be charged after your order has been completed.)

Please note the two categories of transcript request: Currently Enrolled Thomas Jefferson University students or Jefferson Alumni or students Formerly Enrolled at Thomas Jefferson University or Abington Memorial Hospital Dixon School of Nursing. Please select the link that is appropriate for your current status. Please note that requesting a transcript via the incorrect venue could delay the processing of your request.

To request your transcript, proceed as follows:

  1. Log in to the Clearinghouse Secure Site using the correct status link:
  2. The site will walk you through placing your order, including delivery options and fees.  You can order as many transcripts as you like in a single session.
  3. Order updates will be emailed or text messaged to you. You can also check status or history online here:  Transcript Order Status Tool
    NOTE:  You will need your order number and the email you used to place your order.
  4. If you need help or have questions about the transcript ordering service, please contact the Clearinghouse at transcripts@studentclearinghouse.org, or by telephone at the (703) 742-4200.

Please contact the Center City Registrar’s Office at (215) 503-8734 if you have additional questions.

Diploma Reprints

For an Associate or Bachelor's Diploma

In order to request a reprint of your diploma, The University Office of the Registrar requires a notarized letter with the following information:

  1. Your name as you would like it printed on the diploma
  2. The reason why you need a diploma reprint
  3. Your social security number
  4. The date and year of your graduation
  5. The degree that you graduated with and program (if applicable)
  6. The address where you would like the diploma sent (Diplomas can not be mailed to P.O. Boxes)
  7. Current phone number
  8. Current email address

Please note, that email requests for diploma reprints will not be accepted.

Along with this letter, there is a $25 fee set for all reprint costs, and checks may be made payable to the TJU Registrar's Office. Please mail both the letter and the check to the following address:

Office of the Registrar
Thomas Jefferson University
1015 Walnut Street Suite 115, Curtis Building
Philadelphia, PA 19107

Reprint diploma requests may take up to three weeks for processing.

For a PhD, MD or Master's Diploma

In order to request a reprint of your diploma, The University Office of the Registrar requires a notarized letter with the following information:

  1. Your name as you would like it printed on the diploma
  2. The reason why you need you need a diploma reprint.  The University will only re-print your diploma if it was damaged.  The damaged diploma will need to be returned to the University prior to a new one being issued. 
  3. Your social security number
  4. The date and year of your graduation
  5. The degree that you graduated with and program (if applicable)
  6. The address where you would like the diploma sent (Diplomas can not be mailed to P.O. Boxes)
  7. Current phone number
  8. Current email address

Please note, that email requests for diploma reprints will not be accepted.

Along with this letter, there is a $90 fee set for all reprint costs, and checks may be made payable to the TJU Registrar's Office. Please mail both the letter and the check to the following address:

Office of the Registrar
Thomas Jefferson University
1015 Walnut Street Suite 115, Curtis Building
Philadelphia, PA 19107

An outside vendor is contracted by the University to engross these diplomas, so consequently, a reprint diploma can take anywhere from six to nine weeks for completion.

Diploma Size Reduction

According to input from both the Office of the Registrar and the Student Affairs Office, the diplomas for advanced degrees (i.e., master's degrees and beyond) at Thomas Jefferson University are so large, that graduate's often contact them in search of the safest method in which they can shrink down their diploma — most often due to the request from a new employer.

The most reliable method we have discovered is to use a machine called a "Wide Format Scan System" that may be found at any FedEx Kinkos Store. Please go to their Web site to find a store near you.

Please remember that although your current employer may not have asked for a copy of your diploma, another employer in the future may ask for it, so it is best to go through the process before the diploma is framed.

Commencement History

Academic Regalia

The attire worn at academic ceremonies evolved from the dress worn by clergy in the 12th and 13th centuries. In 1222. the Archbishop of Canterbury, Stephen Langston, decreed that a closed, flowing gown known as the "cappa clausa" be worn by all clerics within his jurisdiction. Because Oxford and Cambridge were within the provinces of Canterbury, the clerks at both institutions adopted this style of attire. Hoods seem to have served to cover the tonsured head until superseded for that purpose by the skull cap.

Throughout the years European universities have continued to show great diversity in their academic dress. On the other hand, American universities, when they decided to adopt academic dress in 1895, immediately established a code of regulations which today is followed by practically all American institutions. The establishment of this code has made it possible to distinguish the associate's, bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees and, at the same time, recognize the university which has conferred the degree.

The associate in arts and bachelor's gowns have pointed sleeves and are worn closed. The master's gown has oblong sleeves, open at the wrist. The rear part of its oblong shape is a square cut and the front part has an arc cut away, and may be worn open or closed. The doctor's gown has bell-shaped sleeves, that can be worn open or closed. The majority of gowns are black, but a number of institutions have adopted other colors to identify special programs or groups within that institution.

The hoods vary in length: 48 inches for the doctoral degree, 42 inches for the master's and 36 for both bachelor's and associate's. All hoods are lined in silk in the academic color or colors of the institution conferring the degree. If the institution has more than one color, the colors are shown in divisions using chevrons. The binding or edge of the doctoral, master's and bachelor's hoods are typically made out of velvet in the color designating the subject in which the degree was granted. The associate's hood does not have a velvet border and the outside is black.

Black mortarboards are most commonly worn; four-sided and six-sided tams of various colors are also used.

Some of the colors in the bindings of hoods are:

  • Arts and Letters: White
  • Business: Drab (Tan)
  • Dental Medicine: Lilac
  • Education: Light Blue
  • Engineering:  Orange
  • Fine Arts: Brown
  • Law: Purple
  • Medicine: Green
  • Nursing: Apricot
  • Pharmacy: Olive Green
  • Philosophy (PhD): Dark Blue
  • Public Health: Salmon Pink
  • Science: Golden Yellow
  • Social Work: Citron
  • Veterinary Medicine: Gray

Presidential Medallion of Thomas Jefferson University

Presidential Medalliaon of TJU

The President's Medallion was created in 2009 during the tenure of Robert L. Barchi, MD, PhD, the fourth President of Thomas Jefferson University. It replaced the previous, well-worn President’s Medallion made in 1977, which had depicted four old corporate seals used in various eras of the institution’s history.

The current medallion was designed and crafted by Tiffany & Company, New York. It consists of a sterling silver medallion suspended from a heavy, silver double-link chain. The medallion’s obverse depicts the University seal; a bas-relief profile of Thomas Jefferson and the surround reads, “THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY – 1824,” the year the institution was founded. The reverse is engraved with the names of the four University Presidents.

Silver is a metal long-associated with medicine and is recognized to have anti–bacterial properties.  Hippocrates (ca. 300 BCE) acknowledged the healing powers of silver and the ancients used silver bottles to keep water or wine from spoiling. The expression "born with a silver spoon in your mouth" comes from the Middle Ages; when the wealthy gave their children silver spoons to suck on to prevent disease. 

Like many academic traditions, the display of a heavy "chain of office" comes down to us from medieval regalia and represents the weight of responsibility for the wearer. The chain itself connotes strength in unity, as well as strong communication.

The Presidential Medallion is worn by the President at all convocations of the University.

Processional

The Jefferson Processional was commissioned by the Alumni Association of the Jefferson Medical College and played for the first time on November 15, 1974, at the Sesquicentennial Celebration of the Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. This piece was presented to Thomas Jefferson University by the President of the Alumni Association of the Jefferson Medical College, John J. Gartland, MD. It was composed by Burle Marx.