Thomas Jefferson University

Jefferson Humanities & Health

Jefferson Humanities & Health supports student engagement in the arts and humanities to promote essential skills related to healthcare including close observation, critical thinking, communication and empathy.

Throughout the year, our programs highlight the social contexts of health and wellness, lived experiences of diverse individuals and communities, and self-care for health professionals.

Each academic year, Jefferson Humanities & Health explores a thought-provoking theme from a wide range of perspectives. During the 2020-2021 academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum speaker series will bring a handful of multidisciplinary scholars and thinkers to investigate the theme Creativity.

Throughout the year, forum events will explore aspects of Creativity as it relates to non-conformity, equity, connection/care, collaboration, and persistence/resilience. Learn more about the Jefferson Humanities Forum here.

Announcements

Jefferson Humanities & Health and Inside Out present the Diversity + Professionalism in Health + Science: Short Essay Contest. Jefferson students in all academic programs are invited to reflect on diversity and representation in health and science fields (prompt below).

Submission deadline: November 29, 2020

Learn more and submit here.

Submissions will be read by a panel of students and faculty organized by the Inside Out Editorial team. The first place winner will receive a $100 Amazon gift card and be published in Inside Out, and two honorable mentions will receive a $50 gift card and be reviewed by the formal Inside Out editorial board for publication. Students may receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate program for submitting an essay. This contest is open to students in all academic programs.

Questions? Reach out to Inside Out co-editors Benjamin Barnhart and Sophia Lam.

________________________________________________________________________

Essay Prompt

In approximately 500 words, consider and respond to the following:

Students at Jefferson share a common goal of becoming leaders in healthcare and scientific industries.

Unfortunately, widely available data show that STEM and healthcare fields lack diverse and inclusive representation. Black, Hispanic or Latinx, and female populations are underrepresented in public university faculty (Diyi and Koedel, 2017), and publicly funded research and clinical trials utilize data from disproportionately white populations (Popejoy and Fullerton, 2016; Knepper and McLeod, 2018). At the same time, diversity in public health and healthcare fields has been shown to increase access to and quality of healthcare for vulnerable populations and address numerous healthcare disparities (Bouye, McCleary, and Williams, 2016).

In your own words, reflect on the obstacles facing adequate representation and the benefits of diversity and inclusion in STEM and health professions.

Learn more and submit here.

References:

1. Li, Diyi, and Cory Koedel. "Representation and salary gaps by race-ethnicity and gender at selective public universities." Educational Researcher 46, no. 7 (2017): 343-354.

2. Popejoy, Alice B., and Stephanie M. Fullerton. "Genomics is failing on diversity." Nature News 538, no. 7624 (2016): 161.

3. Knepper, Todd C., and Howard L. McLeod. "When will clinical trials finally reflect diversity?." (2018): 157-159.

4. Bouye, Karen E., Karl J. McCleary, and Kevin B. Williams. "Increasing diversity in the health professions: reflections on student pipeline programs." Journal of healthcare, science and the humanities 6, no. 1 (2016): 67.

The Jefferson Chamber Orchestra is inviting all interested Jefferson student musicians to participate in a virtual holiday concert which will be broadcast in December. The music performed will be the final movement of Holst’s St. Paul Suite. Students who are interested in joining this event are asked to contact Anna.Chen@students.jefferson.edu as soon as possible!

Jefferson students, have you checked out the Student Affairs Canvas course page? 

Visit this new platform to get the latest updates about upcoming programs and events put on by the Jefferson Recreation & Fitness Center, Office of Residential Life, Student Counseling Center, and more!

All Center City students have been added to the course! For more information, and self-enroll instructions, go here

Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) is now accepting submissions for the 39th annual William Carlos Williams poetry competition. Poetry submissions are welcome from medical students currently enrolled in schools of allopathic or osteopathic medicine located in the US, Puerto Rico, and Canada. Submission deadline: 11:59 p.m. EST., December 31, 2020.

Each year, the William Carlos Williams competition receives hundreds of entries, which are judged by the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University. Authors of the top three prize-winning poems will receive a monetary award ($300, $200, and $100 for first, second, and third place, respectively) and their work will be considered for publication in the Journal of Medical Humanities. In addition, the first-, second-, and third-place prize winners are invited to NEOMED to read their work alongside a featured reader in the annual awards ceremony in April. (COVID permitting; travel expenses are paid by NEOMED’s Department of Family and Community Medicine.) 

For submission details, eligibility criteria, and to submit online, please visit NEOMED's William Carlos Williams poetry competition webpage. Reach out to wcw@neomed.edu with any questions or for additional information.

Attention: Registration is still open for the 2020-21 Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, a co-curricular program that rewards sustained engagement in arts and humanities activities throughout the academic year. All Jefferson students are invited to complete the certificate by attending eight (8) Jefferson Humanities & Health events and completing a reflection portfolio of four (4) reflection prompts.

Events that are eligible for Asano credit will be marked with an astericks (*) on the event calendar below. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending an event, please email Matilda Ostow, Humanities Program Coordinator, to confirm your attendance.

>>> Register for the certificate program HERE! <<<

October

Inis Nua Reading Series: Reconceiving Family 

Virtual play reading, available through Sat., Oct. 31

Free and open to the public; register to access the virtual play reading here

Play reading: No Kids by George Mann & Nir Paldi (England)

George and Nir have always found a way to balance their marriage with the theatre company they run together. But as they consider becoming parents, the only way they know how to work through their hopes and fears is to make a play about it.

A virtual play reading will be available for participants from Weds., Oct. 28-Sat., Oct. 31. After viewing the reading, all are welcome to join a casual conversation on Zoom about the play at the Sunday afternoon Teatime Talkback with the artist behind the readings. If you are interested, you can register for the 11/1 Teatime Talkback here.

Inis Nua’s 2020-2021 Reading Series will focus on the range of factors at play when starting a family: from economics, to health, to culture, to beliefs. Four thought-provoking plays look at how four different families begin. All readings and Teatime Talkbacks are free for virtual viewing.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after viewing the virtual play reading.

November

Health Humanities Reading Group

Monday, November 2, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (registration and readings in Canvas, see instructions below)

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Readings:

1]
Alexander, Stephon. (2016). Introduction to The Jazz of physics: the secret link between music and the structure of the universe (pp. 1-9). Basic Books.

2] Haidet, Paul. (2007). Jazz and the ‘art’ of medicine: improvisation in the medical encounter. Annals of Family Medicine, 5(2). 164–169.

Time: 20 min read

In anticipation of theoretical physicist and jazz musician Stephon Alexander’s visit on 11/11, HHRG will consider improvisational technique in healthcare, science, and music. Improvisation is essential to fine-tuning communication, listening, and research skills and providing truly patient-centered care.

Special guest discussant: Debra Lew Harder, MD, DMA, Medicine + Music, Office of Academic Affairs, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University.

About HHRG: The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session. 

To access the readings and registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Megan Voeller, and visit the Health Humanities Reading Group page in the Ongoing Programs module. 

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Monday, November 9, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (registration and readings in Canvas, see instructions below)

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Readings:

1] "Life During Covid-19" Preliminary Findings Report by Jefferson MPH student researchers Julianne LaRosa, Cierrah Doran, Amanda Guth, et al.  

2] Bugos, Eva, Rosemary Frasso, et al. “Practical Guidance and Ethical Considerations for Studies Using Photo Elicitation Interviews.” Preventing Chronic Disease 11, no. E189 (2014): 1-9. 

Time: 20 min read

This week, HHRG probes the ethics and practice of “photo-elicitation,” a qualitative interviewing technique in which researchers ask community members to photograph their environment, and then use the images to guide in-depth interviews. HHRG will be joined by Dr. Rosemary (Rosie) Frasso, PhD, CPH, Public Health Program Director, and current MPH Students Julianne LaRosa (Jules), Cierrah Doran, and Amanda Guth. The guests will discuss the photo-elicitation project that they initiated at the start of the pandemic, intending to document the student experience of transitioning to online learning and adjusting to new living arrangements.

Special guest discussants: Rosemary (Rosie) Frasso, PhD, CPH, Associate Professor and Program Director, Public Health, Jefferson College of Population Health, and current MPH Students Julianne LaRosa (Jules), Cierrah Doran and Amanda Guth.

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session. 

To access the readings and registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Megan Voeller, and visit the Health Humanities Reading Group page in the Ongoing Programs module. 

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Medicine+Music: Music and Healing in a Time of Pandemic with Dr. Lisa Wong

Monday, November 9, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Zoom (access the link in Canvas, instructions below)

In these unusual times of the Covid pandemic, Dr. Lisa Wong, Associate Co-Director, Arts and Humanities Initiative at Harvard Medical School, reflects on the universal power of music to heal, and invites students to develop their own healing through music projects that can be implemented in their communities.

Dr. Lisa Wong is a musician, arts education advocate, and pediatrician at Milton Pediatric Associates, who participates frequently in national and international conferences on interdisciplinary learning through the arts. A graduate of Harvard University and NYU School of Medicine, she is an assistant professor of pediatrics and associate co-director of the Arts and Humanities Initiative at Harvard Medical School. For the past 4 years, she has taught a seminar on the role of music in education and health at Harvard College.  Dr Wong joined the violin section of the Longwood Symphony Orchestra in 1984. As LSO's President for over twenty years, she helped create LSO's signature “Healing Art of Music Program” which has benefited over 50 Boston-area medical nonprofits in Boston. She is a co-founder of Boston Arts Consortium for Health (BACH) and currently serves on the boards of Conservatory Lab Charter School, New England Foundation for the Arts, and A Far Cry ensemble. She is an advisor to music and health institutes at Berklee College of Music and Lesley University.  Dr. Wong received an honorary doctorate in education from Wheelock College in 2016. Her book Scales to Scalpels: Doctors Who Practice the Healing Arts of Music and Medicine was published in 2012.

Questions? Contact Dr. Susan Rosenthal, Associate Dean and Special Advisor to the Provost and Co-Director of Medicine Plus Music.

To access the event link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Medicine+Plus page in the Event Links module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event.

Exquisite Corpse Drawing Series

Tuesday, November 10, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Zoom (register here

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

“Exquisite corpse” is a drawing game invented by Surrealist artists in the early 1900s. One person draws a head, then conceals her work before passing the sheet of paper on to the next person who draws the figure’s torso. The second person then conceals everything and passes the sheet of paper on to a third person who draws the figure’s legs.  The goal is to use collaboration as a creative tool to generate an image that one could never think up on their own. The final outcomes are meant to be absurd and surprising, and absolutely no artistic experience is needed.

In this fun, low-key session, we'll create several exquisite corpses virtually. All you'll need is white paper (any scrap of computer paper or the back of an envelope will do), a dark-colored pen, and a smartphone.

Upcoming Session

  • Tuesday, December 8, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Julia Clift is a Philadelphia-based artist, educator, and writer. Her paintings and drawings have been exhibited in numerous locations, including Arnot Art Museum, Gross McCleaf Gallery, and Fleisher Art Memorial, and are held in the permanent collection of Wythe Hotel (Brooklyn, NY). In 2016, she received a Barbara Deming Memorial Fund Grant for her Woman Drawings series. She has taught painting and drawing at Tyler School of Art and Architecture, Maryland Institute College of Art, and Thomas Jefferson University (Visualizing Anatomy humanities selective).

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Jefferson Humanities Forum presents Stephon Alexander: The Jazz of Physics

Wednesday, November 11, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (register here)

Free and open to the public

The Jefferson Humanities Forum presents Stephon Alexander, theoretical physicist, musician, and author. In his critically acclaimed book The Jazz of Physics: The Secret Link Between Music and the Structure of the Universe, Alexander parses his twin passions to explore the ways in which jazz music mirrors elements of modern physics, such as quantum mechanics, general relativity, and the physics of the early universe. A lifelong music-lover and professional touring jazz musician, Alexander is interested in how innovations in physics have been and can be inspired by the "improvisational logic" exemplified in jazz performance and practice. Using analogous thinking, Alexander has enhanced not only his physics research, but also his relationship to music and understanding of improvisation, both musically and structurally. Alexander currently serves as President of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSPB) and is a vocal advocate for the importance of research, mentoring, and employment opportunities for people of color pursuing a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) field.

Each academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum explores a thought-provoking theme from a wide range of perspectives, inviting reflection and action around how we improve lives. During 2020-2021, the Jefferson Humanities Forum investigates the theme Creativity. This event and all Jefferson Humanities Forum events are free and open to the public.

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

JeffSOAR: Trauma-Informed Care Panel

Wednesday, November 11, 7-8 p.m., Zoom (event link in Canvas, instructions below)

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

In our careers as healthcare professionals, it is likely that the people we serve will have been exposed to trauma at some point in their life, affecting their health and their trust in the healthcare system. How do you support these patients? How do you gain their trust? How can you help them rebuild a sense of control and empowerment? To answer these questions, JeffSOAR (Jefferson Students Organized Against Rape) is hosting an interprofessional panel for students from all healthcare fields to learn more about trauma-informed care. Hear from an Occupational Therapist, Marriage & Family Therapist, SANE Nurse, and Gender-Affirming Social Worker how to communicate with your patients about sensitive topics such as sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and ongoing abuse and build an environment of trust to prevent re-traumatization.

Panelists:

·         Dr. Lydia S. Navarro-Walker, OTD

·         Catherine Ewers, LMFT

·         Monica Harmon, RN, SANE

·         Anna Kiesnowski, LSW

Attendees will be entered into a raffle for five $10 Saxby’s Coffee gift cards. No pre-registration required.

Questions? Reach out to jeffsoar@jefferson.edu.

To access the event link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the JeffSOAR Panel Event page in the Event Links module. 

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Inis Nua Reading Series: Reconceiving Family 

Virtual play reading, available Weds., Nov. 11-Sat., Nov. 14

Free and open to the public; Register to access the virtual play reading here

Play reading: Made in India by Satinder Chohan (England)

Aditi is seeking to raise her daughters out of poverty, Eva is desperate for a child, and Dr. Gupta is fighting to keep her livelihood. All three women's lives intersect in an international surrogacy clinic in Gujarat, India.

A virtual play reading will be available for participants from Weds., Nov. 11-Sat., Nov. 14. After viewing the reading, all are welcome to join a casual conversation on Zoom about the play at the Sunday afternoon Teatime Talkback with the artist behind the readings. If you are interested, you can register for the 11/15 Teatime Talkback here.

Inis Nua’s 2020-2021 Reading Series will focus on the range of factors at play when starting a family: from economics, to health, to culture, to beliefs. Four thought-provoking plays look at how four different families begin. All readings and Teatime Talkbacks are free for virtual viewing.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after viewing the virtual play reading.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Monday, November 16, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (registration and readings in Canvas, see instructions below)

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Reading: TBD

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session.

To access the readings and registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Megan Voeller, and visit the Health Humanities Reading Group page in the Ongoing Programs module. 

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Mindfulness and Self-Awareness

Monday, November 16, 5-6 p.m., Zoom (register here)

Free and open to Jefferson students

Learning about ourselves, how we think and what makes us experience certain emotions, can help us manage better in times of stress and uncertainty. In this class, using writing, we will teach mindfulness skills that can be used at a moment’s notice to enhance our self-awareness. Instructor: Cindy Savett 

About the Creative Approaches to Self Care workshop series:

In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Co-presented with the Student Personal Counseling Center (SPCC).

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual workshop.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Virtual Cooking with Vetri: Middle Eastern Mezze

Tuesday, November 17, 5 p.m.

For Zoom link/instructions, email Angelina Seeney, Assistant Director of Wellness Programs, to register.

Featured Recipe: Kefta Kabobs, Tabbouleh, Grilled Pineapple, & Spiced Yogurt Dip

The Jefferson Recreation & Fitness Center is teaming up with Vetri Mobile Teaching Kitchen to provide FREE online cooking workshops. These programs will teach employees and students the basics of cooking in a fresh and healthy manner. You can choose to cook along with the chefs, or just watch and learn. You will be supplied with an ingredient list and a list of kitchen supplies you will need on hand.  

Schwartz Rounds: Who Inspires You?

Wednesday, November 25, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (registration link in Canvas, see instructions below)

Join us for our monthly Schwartz Center rounds to share stories of who inspires you personally and professionally! Let’s be in the spirit of “Thanksgiving” and share stories of comraderies and mentorship.

The Schwartz Rounds program offers healthcare providers a regularly scheduled time during their fast-paced work lives to openly and honestly discuss the social and emotional issues they face in caring for patients and families. In contrast to traditional medical rounds, the focus is on the human dimension of medicine. Caregivers have an opportunity to share their experiences, thoughts and feelings on thought-provoking topics drawn from actual patient cases. The premise is that caregivers are better able to make personal connections with patients and colleagues when they have greater insight into their own responses and feelings.

Panelists from diverse disciplines participate in the sessions, including physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, allied health professionals and chaplains. After listening to a panel’s brief presentation on an identified case or topic, caregivers in the audience are invited to share their own perspectives on the case and broader related issues.

Presented by the Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine; Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD.

To access the registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Schwartz Rounds page in the Event Links module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Monday, November 30, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (registration and readings in Canvas, see instructions below)

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Reading: TBD

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session. 

To access the readings and registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Megan Voeller, and visit the Health Humanities Reading Group page in the Ongoing Programs module. 

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

December

Medicine+Music: Musical Skills and Patient Care

Tuesday, December 1, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Zoom (access the link in Canvas, instructions below)

Medicine+Music will be joined by Dr. Beverly Shin for a workshop for Jefferson students on using musical skills such as careful listening, attunement, and focus to deliver optimal patient care. Dr. Shin is a 2017 graduate of Sidney Kimmel Medical College, and is currently a third year resident in Psychiatry at Weill-Cornell Medical Center.

Questions? Contact Dr. Susan Rosenthal, Associate Dean and Special Advisor to the Provost and Co-Director of Medicine Plus Music.

To access the event link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Medicine+Plus page in the Event Links module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Self-Criticism to Self-Compassion

Monday, December 7, 5-6 p.m., Zoom (register here)

Free and open to Jefferson students

We all have inner critics that compare how we are with how we think we should be. While this tendency to judge and evaluate ourselves can be a source of motivation, it can also undermine our sense of self-worth and make us feel “not good enough” in many areas of our lives. This workshop will focus on how to shift from viewing ourselves through a lens of criticism to a lens of compassion. We will utilize music to challenge perfectionism and promote self-acceptance. Instructor: Peggy Tileston, MT-BC

About the Creative Approaches to Self Care workshop series:

In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Co-presented with the Student Personal Counseling Center (SPCC).

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual workshop.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Exquisite Corpse Drawing Series

Tuesday, December 8, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Zoom (register here

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

“Exquisite corpse” is a drawing game invented by Surrealist artists in the early 1900s. One person draws a head, then conceals her work before passing the sheet of paper on to the next person who draws the figure’s torso. The second person then conceals everything and passes the sheet of paper on to a third person who draws the figure’s legs.  The goal is to use collaboration as a creative tool to generate an image that one could never think up on their own. The final outcomes are meant to be absurd and surprising, and absolutely no artistic experience is needed.

In this fun, low-key session, we'll create several exquisite corpses virtually. All you'll need is white paper (any scrap of computer paper or the back of an envelope will do), a dark-colored pen, and a smartphone.

Facilitator: Julia Clift is a Philadelphia-based artist, educator, and writer. Her paintings and drawings have been exhibited in numerous locations, including Arnot Art Museum, Gross McCleaf Gallery, and Fleisher Art Memorial, and are held in the permanent collection of Wythe Hotel (Brooklyn, NY). In 2016, she received a Barbara Deming Memorial Fund Grant for her Woman Drawings series. She has taught painting and drawing at Tyler School of Art and Architecture, Maryland Institute College of Art, and Thomas Jefferson University (Visualizing Anatomy humanities selective).

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.


*Events marked with an asterisk can be counted toward the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate for Jefferson students. 

Please note: Events are added to the calendar as they are confirmed. Please check regularly for additional events. 

Review the list of past events ...


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