Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University

Jefferson Humanities & Health

Jefferson Humanities & Health supports student engagement in the arts and humanities to promote essential skills related to healthcare including close observation, critical thinking, communication and empathy.

Throughout the year, our programs highlight the social contexts of health and wellness, lived experiences of diverse individuals and communities, and self-care for health professionals.

Each academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum explores a thought-provoking theme from a wide range of perspectives. During the 2018-2019 academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum investigates the theme Fusion

Follow Jefferson Humanities on Instagram

Throughout the year, forum events will inquire into aspects of Fusion, including:

  • Collaborations across disciplines resulting in new knowledge, methods and ways of knowing
  • Creative thinking at the intersection of broadly different fields and industries
  • Unconventional combinations of technique, style and perspective

Students are invited to complete the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending eight (8) Jefferson Humanities & Health events during the academic year and completing a portfolio of four (4) reflective essays in response. Registration for the 2018-2019 certificate program is now open.  

CLICK HERE to learn more and register for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate. 

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Megan.Voeller@jefferson.edu.  


Please Note: Jefferson Humanities & Health events are only open to students unless otherwise indicated.

Announcements

Follow us! @JeffersonHumanities is the official instagram account of Jefferson Humanities & Health. We'll post about events, special programs, and all humanities-related events at Jefferson.

HeART Stories: Building Empathy Through the Arts is a two-year collaborative project between Jefferson, Theater of Witness and ARTZ Philadelphia, in which people living with dementia and their care partners become mentors to Jefferson health professions students. All participants engage in a creative process of empathy-building, storytelling and relationship-forming that will culminate in an original theater performance work. LEARN MORE

Fall 2018 Schedule:

Group 1

Sat., Sept. 8, 9:30-10:30 a.m. - Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens
Sat., Sept. 15, 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Sat., Sept. 29, 9:30-10:30 a.m. -  Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens
Sat., Oct. 6, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sun., Oct. 7, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. 
Sat., Oct. 13, 9:30-10:30 a.m. 
Sat., Oct. 20, 9:30-10:30 a.m. - Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens
Sat., Nov. 3, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Sun., Nov. 4, 12-2 p.m. **optional
Sat., Nov. 10, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Sat., Nov. 17, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Group 2

Sat., Sept. 8, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - Woodmere Art Museum
Sat., Sept. 15, 2:30-3:30 p.m. 
Sat., Sept. 29, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - Woodmere Art Museum
Sat., Oct. 6, 1-2:30 p.m. 
Sun., Oct. 7, 1-3 p.m. 
Sat., Oct. 13, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - Woodmere Art Museum
Sat., Oct. 20, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m
Sat., Nov. 3, 1:30-4:30 p.m.
Sun., Nov. 4, 12-2 p.m. **optional
Sat., Nov. 10, 12:30-2:30 p.m. 
Sat., Nov. 17, 12:30-2:30 p.m. 

Group 3

Tues., Sept. 11, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. - Fleisher Art Memorial
Tues., Sept. 18, 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Tues., Sept. 25, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. - Fleisher Art Memorial
Tuesday, Oct. 2, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 6, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 9, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. - Fleisher Art Memorial
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 4, 12-2 p.m. **optional
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 13, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Group 4

Tuesday, Sept. 11, 1:30-2:30 p.m. - St Stephen’s Church
Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2:30-3:30 p.m. - St Stephen’s Church
Tuesday, Sept. 25, 1:30-2:30 p.m. - St Stephen’s Church
Tuesday, Oct. 2, 1:30-3 p.m. - St Stephen’s Church
Saturday, Oct. 6, 1-3 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 9, 1:30-2:30 p.m. - St Stephen’s Church
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1:30-2:30 p.m. - St Stephen’s Church
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 1:30-4:30 p.m. - St Stephen’s Church
Sunday, Nov. 4, 12-2 p.m. **optional
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Course Instructor: Christian “Patch” Patchell, University of the Arts

In recent years, artists and health professionals have turned to graphic stories to depict and discuss issues related to medical care and practice, including: 

-Changing cultural perceptions of medicine
-Patient/carer/provider experiences
-Difficult subjects such as grief and loss, mental illness, burnout and bias
-Helping other sufferers or carers

This course will provide students hands-on experience and conceptual insights related to the many facets of graphic storytelling through exercises, demonstrations and lectures. Students will be exposed to the varied approaches to creativity in graphic medicine; such as comics, cartoons and graphic novels.

The approaches and techniques will apply to writing and outside disciplines alike in both their application towards craft and insight into the medium. Through a series of in-class demonstrations and discussions students will create original works. Students are encouraged to work within the many different genres within writing and comics (not just super heroes) as well as experiment with different approaches, styles and techniques.

The class will emphasize the importance of visual storytelling and observation. There will also be an emphasis on conceptualizing and creating a personal narrative regardless of the assignment. Through a focused series of exercises the class will cover the following:

  • Creating Interesting Characters and Environments
  • Basic Comics Language and Vocabulary
  • Creating Original and Interesting Concepts
  • Three Act Narratives
  • Empathy as Inspiration
  • Juxtaposing Image with Text
  • Problem Solving
  • the Art of Collaboration
  • Making Assignments Personal
  • Experimental Storytelling/Structure
  • Creativity through Observation
  • and the various outlets for the stories they create

There will also be academic components covering: the History of Comics, Graphic Novels in other mediums (i.e. video games, movies, television, etc.), Comics in Pop Culture, etc.

Schedule:

Mon., Sept. 10, 6-8 p.m. - Hamilton 505

Mon., Sept. 24, 6-8 p.m. - Hamilton 505

Mon., Oct. 1, 6-8 p.m. - Hamilton 505

Mon., Oct. 8, 6-8 p.m. - Hamilton 505 

Mon., Nov. 12, 6-8 p.m. - Hamilton 505

Mon., Nov. 26, 6-8 p.m. - Hamilton 224/225

Mon., Dec. 3, 6-8 p.m.- Hamilton 224/225

Mon., Dec. 10, 6-8 p.m. - Hamilton 505

The Empathy Project, a collaboration between Jefferson and Lantern Theater Company initiated by Dr. Sal Mangione, seeks to foster empathy and tolerance for ambiguity among health professions students using the tools and techniques of the theatrical form. The project consists of a series of workshops designed to introduce Jefferson students and health professionals to the theatrical form, explore the basic tools of actors and playwrights, and guide them through the writing and staging of original short plays.

Fall 2018 Schedule

Mon., Sep. 24, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Oct. 1, 7-9:30 p.m. 
Mon., Oct. 8, 7-9:30 p.m.  
Mon., Oct. 15, 7-9:30 p.m.  
Mon., Nov. 12, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Nov. 26, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Dec. 3, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Dec. 10, 7-9:30 p.m.

Learn more

Jefferson students can take advantage of student discounts and pay-as-you-wish programs at many Philadelphia cultural organizations, including theaters and museums. For a select list of such programs, click here and scroll to Arts & Humanities. 

August

Mon., Aug. 27, 6 p.m., Hamilton Building, 1001 Locust St., Connelly Auditorium

College of Architecture and the Built Environment kicks off the 2018 Fall Lecture Series with Karim Rashid.

Visionary and prolific, Karim Rashid is one of the most unique voices in design today. With more than 4000 designs in production, nearly 300 awards to his name, and client work in over 40 countries, Karim's ability to transcend typology continues to make him a force among designers of his generation. Eschewing style in favor of designing in the modus of our time, Karim's designs include luxury goods for Christofle, Alessi, and Veuve Clicquot; democratic products for Umbra, bobble, and 3M; timeless furniture for Bonaldo, Tonelli, BoConcept, and Vandorn; exquisite lighting for Artemide and Fontana Arte; high-tech products for Asus and Sirinlabs; surface design for Marburg and Abet Laminati; iconic graphics for Citibank and Sony Ericsson; and award-winning packaging for Method, Paris Baguette, Kenzo, and Eos. 

This event is open to the public. No registration required

September

Fri, September 7, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
448 North 10th Street

Free for Jefferson students, but tickets are limited. Pre-registration required HERE.

Philadelphia’s Bearded Ladies Cabaret has some treats for you. Do You Want A Cookie? transforms an old factory to concoct the perfect cabaret confections to satisfy your cravings. Part Great Cabaret Bake-Off, part irreverent romp through cabaret history, the show is at once subversive, joyous, provocative, and communal.

An international cast of cabaret artists perform across two levels of a cavernous space refitted as a seductive nightclub, presenting a live history of cabaret from Le Chat Noir to Weimar nightlife to 21st-century drag. Do You Want A Cookie? sees the live culmination of a multi-year study by John Jarboe and Sally Ollove of cabaret’s history and evolution

About The Bearded Ladies Cabaret:
The Bearded Ladies Cabaret is an interdisciplinary troupe of artists who reinvigorate and redefine the form of cabaret in the 21st century by fusing it with theater, opera, and dance. They play with nostalgia and humor to question the embedded social messages in popular culture and tackle the politics of gender, identity, and artistic invention with sparkle and wit. Their work has been seen all over Philadelphia including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Eastern State Penitentiary, Opera Philadelphia, the Wilma Theater, and FringeArts and they have brought their cabaret revolution to Miami, New Zealand, Seattle, Paris, Maryland, Delaware and New York City (Ars Nova, La Mama, and Joe’s Pub).

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

 

Sat., September 15, 7 p.m.
Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, 300 South Broad Street

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available starting August 10 HERE.

The Philadelphia Orchestra celebrates ten years of music-making under the baton of conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin. The concert features Grieg’s Piano Concerto performed by André Watts, Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances, and the world premiere of the orchestral suite for Nico Muhly’s opera Marnie, based on the Alfred Hitchcock film. Tickets are free for Jefferson students with pre-registration and include a pre-concert talk by an Orchestra musician.

Faculty/Staff: Use discount code TBD to purchase tickets for up to 30% off at philorch.org. (Sections Orchestra 1 and Tier 1 are excluded from the promo code.) To join the pre-concert talk as faculty/staff, RSVP to humanities@jefferson.edu.

Mon., Sept. 17-Sat., Sept. 22, Hamilton Building, 1001 Locust Street, 4th Floor lobby

Willie Baronet is an award-winning graphic designer and Stan Richards Professor in Creative Advertising at Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts. Since 1993, Baronet has been buying and collecting signs from people soliciting support on the street, in response to his own discomfort witnessing poverty. In 2014, Baronet and three filmmakers drove across the U.S., interviewing more than 100 people on the streets and purchasing over 280 signs while producing the documentary film, Signs of Humanity. In July 2018, Baronet completed a residency in Philadelphia, collecting signs and interviews with JCPH associate professor Rosemary Frasso. The exhibition Signs of Humanity includes signs from Philadelphia as well as signs previously collected by Baronet.

To learn more about Willie Baronet and his work, see his website: http://www.weareallhomeless.org/

Weds., Sept. 19, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton Building, 1001 Locust Street, Room 505
Signs of Humanity (2016, dir. Willie Baronet and Tim Chumley, 63 min.)

Willie Baronet is an award-winning graphic designer and Stan Richards Professor in Creative Advertising at Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts. Since 1993, Baronet has been buying and collecting signs from people soliciting support on the street, in response to his own discomfort witnessing poverty. In 2014, Baronet and three filmmakers drove across the U.S., interviewing more than 100 people on the streets and purchasing over 280 signs while producing the documentary film, Signs of Humanity. Lunch provided; first-come, first-served.

Learn more about the documentary and find clips here: http://signsofhumanity.org/

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Thurs., Sept. 20, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton Building, 1001 Locust Street, 4th Floor lobby

This event is open to the public. Registration is appreciated, but not required. Learn More.

Join us for a reception celebrating the exhibition Signs of Humanity, featuring a panel discussion with artist Willie Baronet and JCPH associate professor Rosemary Frasso.

Willie Baronet is an award-winning graphic designer and Stan Richards Professor in Creative Advertising at Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts. Since 1993, Baronet has been buying and collecting signs from people soliciting support on the street, in response to his own discomfort witnessing poverty. In 2014, Baronet and three filmmakers drove across the U.S., interviewing more than 100 people on the streets and purchasing over 280 signs while producing the documentary film, Signs of Humanity. In July 2018, Baronet completed a residency in Philadelphia, collecting signs and interviews with JCPH associate professor Rosemary Frasso. The exhibition Signs of Humanity includes signs from Philadelphia as well as signs previously collected by Baronet.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Mon., Sept. 24, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Balancing Work and Life
Mon., Sept. 24, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available HERE starting August 30.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Juggling school along with other life commitments is a challenge that can leave us feeling stressed and pulled in different directions. In this art and movement-based workshop, we will practice exercises that promote an awareness of what balance actually feels and looks like. We will explore setting boundaries, how to prevent burnout, and how to recognize, listen to and meet our own needs.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Sat., September 29, 1:30 p.m.
Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, 300 South Broad Street

Tickets are free for Jefferson students, but seats are limited and pre-registration is required. Registration will be available starting August 24 HERE.

Is there any grace in forgetting? Don’t miss the next new work brought to life at Opera Philadelphia, one of “the most creative and ambitious companies in this country” (The New York Times). This new chamber opera finds fleeting beauty in memory loss through an unflinching yet uplifting exploration of living with Alzheimer’s disease. Frederica von Stade and Marietta Simpson embody this fantastical world premiere from composer Lembit Beecher and librettist Hannah Moscovitch. (Opera Philadelphia)

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

October

Mon., Oct. 1, 12-1 p.m., JAH M25

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Mon., Oct. 8, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Saturday, Oct. 13, 8 p.m.
Zellerbach Theatre, Annenberg Center

Free for Jefferson students, but pre-registration required. Registration available HERE starting September 6

Nearly 50 years ago, two towering public figures, African-American author James Baldwin and white anthropologist Margaret Mead, sat together and recorded an epic and intimate seven-and-a-half-hour conversation about race in America. Now, choreographer Donald Byrd and playwright Anna Deavere Smith re-imagine that conversation in the present in A Rap on Race. This new dance-theatre work combines text with movement and music to communicate the complexities of talking about race, at a time when that conversation is as necessary as ever.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Coping With Stress
Mon., Oct. 15, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available HERE starting Sept. 4

This writing and movement based workshop will focus on coping with stress. Learn how to identify the physical and emotional symptoms of stress, as well as how to move through them to a more grounded and relaxed state.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Mon., Oct. 15, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Fri., Oct. 19, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton 505

This event is open to the public, but pre-registration is required. Registration will be available HERE starting Sept. 13.

Anne Basting is a theater artist and educator demonstrating the potential of storytelling and creative expression to improve the lives of elders experiencing cognitive impairment. Across a variety of platforms, including collaborative public performance and academic research, Basting has developed an alternative concept of aging that focuses on its possibilities as well as its challenges. Basting is Professor of Theater in the Peck School of the Arts at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, founder and president of TimeSlips Creative Storytelling, and a 2016 MacArthur Fellow.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Mon., Oct. 22, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Sun., October 28, 1:30 p.m.
Meet at Ratchada Thai Restaurant (1117 S. 11th St.)

The tour and all food is free for Jefferson students, but tickets are limited and pre-registration required. Registration will be available HERE starting Sept. 13

Join fellow Jefferson students for a private food tour of South Philadelphia's Asian cuisine! Mention the words “South Philly” and almost everyone immediately pictures the Italian Market. Yet, nestled in and around the market is outstanding Asian cuisine. On this tour, we'll get a taste of various cultures and culinary traditions. As a special treat, this is the only tour in Philadelphia that is granted access to a Buddhist temple.

Philly's Asian Cuisine tour will visit:

  • A Thai restaurant to sample three delicious Thai appetizers in the lavishly decorated dining room.
  • A Vietnamese restaurant to enjoy a scrumptious and exquisitely made roasted pork Banh Mi (Vietnamese hoagie).
  • One of the area's best Indian restaurants to enjoy two fantastic appetizers and a delicious dessert.
  • A Buddhist temple to see its elaborate and ornate interior. There, we'll share some fascinating facts about the symbolism and meaning of ceremonial items. This is a rare opportunity you won't want to miss.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Mon., Oct 29, 5-6:30 p.m.
JAH Atrium

Jefferson clinicians share stories that address the critical balance for health professionals between the profound meaning and joy that come with providing care and the necessity for resilience in response to the stresses of caregiving. Story Slams involve a series of speakers presenting five-minute stories that revolve around a particular theme. This interdisciplinary event will showcase perspectives from a variety of health professions.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

November

Mon., Nov. 5, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton 212

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Inis Nua Reading Series: Medicine in Modern Life
Play reading: The Effect by Lucy Prebble
Mon., Nov. 12, 7 p.m., Drake Theatres (302 South Hicks St.)

Inis Nua’s 2018-2019 Reading Series takes a look at how medical and scientific advances have shaped our lives. Exploring how we are affected by the illnesses we suffer, the treatment we receive, and the motivations of those who treat us, three very different stories show the problems created by some of the solutions of science and medicine.

This theme is echoed in The Effect, by Lucy Prebble: “When Connie and Tristan meet on a paid overnight drug trial, the chemistry isn’t immediate. But when a romance starts to develop under these strange conditions, it’s hard to tell what is a genuine emotion and what is just a side effect.”

No registration required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Mon., Nov. 19, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: From Self-Criticism to Self-Compassion
Mon., Nov. 19, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available HERE starting October 15.

We all have inner critics that compare how we are with how we think we should be. While this tendency to judge and evaluate ourselves can be a source of motivation, it can also undermine our sense of self-worth and make us feel “not good enough” in many areas of our lives. This workshop will focus on how to shift from viewing ourselves through a lens of criticism to a lens of compassion. We will utilize writing and music to challenge perfectionism and promote self-acceptance.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by 3 creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event

Mon., Nov. 26, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

December

Mon., Dec. 3, 12-1 p.m., JAH M23

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Weds., Dec. 5, 12-1 p.m.,
Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

Alan Lightman, who worked for many years as a theoretical physicist, is the author of six novels, including the international bestseller Einstein’s Dreams, as well as The Diagnosis, a finalist for the National Book Award. He has taught at Harvard and at MIT, where he was the first person to receive a dual faculty appointment in science and the humanities. He is currently professor of the practice of the humanities at MIT. In 2018, he published two new books: Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine, about science, religion, and their different ways of knowing the world, and In Praise of Wasting Time. He is also the founder of the Harpswell Foundation, an organization devoted to the advancement of women in Southeast Asia.

This event is open to the public.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self-Care: Transforming Mental and Emotional States
Mon., Dec. 10, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available HERE starting November 5.

When life gets stressful and the pressures of school, work and home life are piling up, it’s easy to get stuck in negative emotions and self-defeating thoughts. This workshop will utilize art and music to break up mental and emotional stuck points and introduce new ways of rejuvenating our spirits.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by 3 creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Mon., Dec. 10, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.


*Events marked with an asterisk can be counted toward the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate for Jefferson students. 

Please note: Events are added to the calendar as they are confirmed. Please check regularly for additional events. 

To see a list of Past Events, go to the tab at the left.