Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University

Jefferson Humanities & Health

Jefferson Humanities & Health supports student engagement in the arts and humanities to promote essential skills related to healthcare including close observation, critical thinking, communication and empathy.

Throughout the year, our programs highlight the social contexts of health and wellness, lived experiences of diverse individuals and communities, and self-care for health professionals.

Each academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum explores a thought-provoking theme from a wide range of perspectives. During the 2018-2019 academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum investigates the theme Fusion

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Throughout the year, forum events will inquire into aspects of Fusion, including:

  • Collaborations across disciplines resulting in new knowledge, methods and ways of knowing
  • Creative thinking at the intersection of broadly different fields and industries
  • Unconventional combinations of technique, style and perspective

Students are invited to complete the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending eight (8) Jefferson Humanities & Health events during the academic year and completing a portfolio of four (4) reflective essays in response. Registration for the 2018-2019 certificate program is now open.  

CLICK HERE to learn more and register for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate. 

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Megan.Voeller@jefferson.edu.  


Please Note: Jefferson Humanities & Health events are only open to students unless otherwise indicated.

Announcements

Becoming the Vessel: Intensive Theater of Witness Training
Friday, January 11, 7-9 p.m.
Saturday, January 12, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Sunday, January 13, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Led by Theater of Witness founder and artistic director Teya Sepinuck, this 16-hour experiential workshop focuses on strengthening and expanding participants' ability to bear witness and work creatively with stories of suffering and transformation. Participants will practice deep listening and how to become vessels of steadiness, compassion and wisdom for themselves as well as for others. They will create short autobiographical stories and work closely in creative partnerships.

Free and open to the public; space is limited and a discussion with Teya is required in advance. Contact teya@theaterofwitness.org for more information.

Learn more about HeART Stories and register for the Spring 2019 program now! 

All Jefferson students and medical residents are encouraged to submit prose, poetry, art and photography to the annual literary and arts journal, Inside Out. The deadline to submit is February 1, 2019. Learn more and view last year's issue HERE.

Please see attached the announcement of two $5,000 competitive research fellowships to be awarded by the Arlen Specter Center at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. Graduate students or post-graduate scholars in relevant areas, like political science, international studies, history, public policy, public administration, or public health are invited to apply. Application deadline:  December 17, 2018.  See attached for details.

Learn more and see last year’s fellows: http://www.philau.edu/spectercenter/research-fellowship.html

The Empathy Project, a collaboration between Jefferson and Lantern Theater Company initiated by Dr. Sal Mangione, seeks to foster empathy and tolerance for ambiguity among health professions students using the tools and techniques of the theatrical form. The project consists of a series of workshops designed to introduce Jefferson students and health professionals to the theatrical form, explore the basic tools of actors and playwrights, and guide them through the writing and staging of original short plays.

Spring 2019 Schedule

Mon., Jan. 28, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Feb. 4, 7-9:30 p.m. 
Mon., Feb. 11, 7-9:30 p.m.  
Mon., Feb. 25, 7-9:30 p.m.  
Mon., Mar. 4, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Mar. 18, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Mar. 25, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Apt. 15, 7-9:30 p.m.

Learn more

Jefferson students can take advantage of student discounts and pay-as-you-wish programs at many Philadelphia cultural organizations, including theaters and museums. For a select list of such programs, click here and scroll to Arts & Humanities. 

December

Thursday, December 13, 6 p.m., JAH 207

Come join QuIPS/IHI (Quality Improvement & Patient Safety/Institute for Healthcare Improvement) and the Gibbon Surgical Society for a screening of Transparent Health’s “The Faces of Medical Errors, from Tears to Transparency: the Story of Lewis Blackman.” The film tells the story of how gaps in proper informed consent led to devastating medical errors. Following the film screening will be a discussion moderated by Jefferson surgery resident Courtney Devin, who is currently on her research year and is interested in QI/patient safety and pediatric surgery. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Friday, December 14, 8 p.m.
St. Luke and the Epiphany (330 S. 13th Street)

At the 42nd Annual Holiday Concert, the Thomas Jefferson University Choir and Orchestra present:
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Missa Longa, Carols of the Season and Handel's "Hallelujah Chorus." The concert is free and no registration is required

Conductor: Robert Thayer Sataloff, M.D., D.M.A
Associate Conductors: Margaret M. Baroody, M.M. and Michael Mahla, M.D.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Tuesday, December 18, 12-3 p.m., JAH Atrium

The Jefferson College of Nursing Poverty Simulation is open to all Jefferson students. Register HERE.

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line? (The poverty line is currently $24,600 per year for a family of four, and $16,240 for a family of two.) In addition, Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among large cities in the U.S. Deep poverty is defined as living below half of the poverty line, meaning that many families are living on less than $8-12,000 a year in Philadelphia. This experience of poverty has far reaching implications - even towards long term health and survival.  

JCN will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall and winter to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Students will work on teams to navigate a month in the life of particular families. Students are given a family structure to work within (kids, older parents, single parented etc), and a dollar amount for the month. Staff will be in the room to simulate the various tasks, government agencies and hurdles in daily life.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

January

Monday, January 14, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Inis Nua Reading Series: Medicine in Modern Life
Play reading: Fibres by Francis Poet
Monday, January 14, 7 p.m., Drake Theatres (302 South Hicks St.)

Inis Nua’s 2018--2019 Reading Series takes a look at how medical and scientific advances have shaped our lives. Exploring how we are affected by the illnesses we suffer, the treatment we receive, and the motivations of those who treat us, three very different stories show the problems created by some of the solutions of science and medicine. Learn More.

In Fibres, by Frances Poet, “Jack’s exposure to asbestos as a shipbuilder in 1970s Glasgow has shaped his family’s life for decades. Now his wife and daughter must each make their own peace with the consequences.”

No registration required. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Rebecca Harris (rebecca.e.harris@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Tuesday, January 15, 12-1 p.m., Eakins Lounge
The Art of the Duo: violinist Diane Monroe and vibraphonist Tony Miceli

As with all relationships, friendships and collaborations the duo is often the most rewarding, intimate and challenging. Diane and Tony have been collaborating for the last 20+ years performing as a duo in concerts, clubs and festivals.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, January 28, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

This week's Health Humanities Reading Group will focus on One Book, One Philadelphia--The Free Library of Philadelphia's signature event. One Book, One Philadelphia promotes literacy, library usage, and citywide conversation by encouraging the entire greater Philadelphia area to come together through reading and discussing a single book. At this special reading group, we'll be reading from this year's chosen book: Jesmyn Ward's award-winning novel Sing, Unburied, Sing.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Managing Anxiety and Insecurity
Monday, January 28, 5-7 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall room M23

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available HERE starting January 3.

This art and movement based workshop will directly address stress and anxiety management.  We will guide you through relaxation, meditation and breathing exercises that you can easily practice at home.  We will connect these embodied exercises with visual art that will be a comforting reminder of skills that are available to you.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by 3 creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Tuesday, January 29, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton Lobby
Orchestra 2001: The Big Bang

Orchestra 2001’s percussion section steps out front to present a chamber program of contemporary music featuring over thirty different instruments. Music by American composers will display the diversity and evolution of their craft from the back of the orchestra to becoming modern, virtuoso performers who play a different instrument setup for every piece. Come see why percussionists put “the bling” into the modern orchestra.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

February

Gold Humanism Honor Society Annual Humanism in Medicine Conference: Maintaining Empathy, Mental Health, and Resilience in Our Communities 
Saturday, February 2, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Hamilton Building

This is the fourth year Jefferson's Gold Humanism Honor Society medical student chapter will host the annual Humanism in Medicine conference to promote compassionate, collaborative and scientifically excellent care among student doctors. We collaborate with over 11 different medical schools throughout the Northeast region. It is a one day event that will include guest speaker series from both professionals as well as students and workshops based on our conference theme.  Our theme this year is Maintaining Empathy, Mental Health, and Resilience in Our Communities. In order to maintain one’s empathy and understanding of others, it is important to recognize one’s own emotional and psychological needs. In our 2019 conference, we wish to explore this concept in the context of medicine as well as in other disciplines in the community. By acknowledging mental health and wellbeing within us as future providers, we can more effectively be better clinicians and practice humanistic medicine. In addition, recognizing tools to improve one’s own emotional well-being will increase resilience when undoubtedly faced with hardship either through patient settings or within personal lives. In our conference, we wish to also explore how resilience is manifested and ways to improve resilience, not just within the medical community but also within our local communities. By learning from one another these important concepts of working on emotional well being, maintaining empathy for others, as well as building resilience, we can become better, more humanistic providers.

Lunch provided.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, February 4, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, February 4, 5-7:30 p.m., Hamilton Building, Connelly Auditorium and Lobby

As leaders it is essential to be able to communicate respectfully and effectively with others, understand one’s own biases, advocate for others, and effect change.  Take this unique opportunity to further develop and practice those skills through participating in this interactive experience which opens with a courtroom case that participants will not only witness but for which they will also serve as the jury. 

This nationally acclaimed interactive experience explores issues of race, class, religion, gender, and the law.  After witnessing the courtroom drama, participants will engage in a deliberation and facilitated discussion leading to a jury vote.  The Defamation Experience provides an opportunity to “engage in civil discourse about the most pressing issues of our day” and will challenge you to re-examine your perspectives and continue your personal growth and leadership journey.

Presenter:  The Defamation Experience (http://defamationtheplay.com/)

*Students may earn dual credit for both the Leadership LIVE certificate and the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, February 11, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Relaxation
Monday, February 11, 5-7 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall room M23

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available HERE starting January 14.

We often think that doing nothing is relaxing, but we may not be truly allowing ourselves to rest and be restored. This music and movement based workshop will support deeper breathing and employ imagery and movement that will help participants experience a more grounded, calmer way of being.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by 3 creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Tuesday, February 12, 12-1 p.m., Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

Open to the public. Registration is appreciated but not required. Learn More

Kerry Brodie is founder and executive director of Emma’s Torch, a New York-based non-profit providing culinary training for refugees as a path to employment that affirms their cultural heritage and cuisine. Brodie began cooking at age five, under the watchful eyes of her grandmother. She is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education, where she won the Wusthof Award for Leadership, and holds degrees in Government from Johns Hopkins University and Near Eastern Studies from Princeton University.

Lunch provided; first come, first served.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Saturday, February 16, 8 p.m.
Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center (300 South Broad St.)

Pre-registration required.

We welcome back Esa-Pekka Salonen for a program of music that’s sure to win hearts, minds, and ears. There’s more to Richard Strauss’s Zarathustra than the few notes heard in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey: It’s a unique experience in the concert hall with orchestra and the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ. The Viola Concerto was one of Bartók’s last compositions. Principal Viola Choong-Jin Chang will effortlessly demonstrate why it’s become perhaps the most popular concerto for his instrument. Hear another side of Bartók’s music with the Miraculous Mandarin Suite, which caused a scandal at its premiere and was banned in Germany. The story it’s based on is a tad grotesque (a prostitute murdering her visitor); we promise nothing but glorious music in our presentation!

Monday, February 25, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

March

Monday, March 4, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Broadway Philadelphia: RENT
Tuesday, March 5, 7:30 p.m., Merriam Theater at the Kimmel Center, 250 S. Broad St.

Pre-registration required.

In 1996, an original rock musical by a little-known composer opened on Broadway… and forever changed the landscape of American theatre. Two decades later, Jonathan Larson’s RENT continues to speak loudly and defiantly to audiences across generations and all over the world. A re-imagining of Puccini's La Bohème, RENT follows an unforgettable year in the lives of seven artists struggling to follow their dreams without selling out. The story takes place just as the AIDS crisis is sweeping through New York. By bringing the audience to the front lines of this epidemic, RENT exposes the physical and psychological impact of this disease on the individual and the national scale. With its inspiring message of joy and hope in the face of fear, this timeless celebration of friendship and creativity reminds us to measure our lives with the only thing that truly matters—love.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Enlightened Ladies: Trios for flute, cello & piano
Tuesday, March 12, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton Lobby

Join us for a special program that will explore “musical light” as imagined by women composers featuring Adeline Tomasone, flute, Vivian Barton, cello, and Gilya Hodos, piano.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, March 18, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Cultivating Self-Acceptance
Monday, March 18, 5-7 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall M23

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available HERE starting February 12.

Truly accepting ourselves requires a letting go of judgments and longings that impede our capacity for leading fulfilling lives. In this workshop, through art and writing, we will explore how to become comfortable with the process – what tools we have and how to retrieve them when they seem to be missing.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by 3 creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

JCO & Arrhythmias: Musical Extravaganza
Tuesday, March 19, 12-1 p.m., Eakins Lounge

Two venerable musical ensembles join forces for a combined program that showcases both vocal and instrumental tunes. The program will feature musicians from both the Jefferson Chamber Orchestra and the Arrhythmias. You won’t want to miss this exciting ensemble extravaganza!

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Sunday, March 24, 8 p.m., Walnut Street Theatre, 825 Walnut St.

Pre-registration required.

Based on Mark Haddon’s best-selling novel, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time follows Christopher, a fifteen-year-old boy with autism. After the untimely death of his neighbor’s dog, the brilliant but unique boy is compelled to investigate the crime. See the world through Christopher’s eyes as he embarks on an extraordinary journey where he challenges assumed truths and discovers life-changing secrets. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is a thrilling, heartwarming, and uplifting adventure story that invites the audience to explore the inner-workings of Christopher’s mind.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, March 25, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Wednesday, March 27, 12-1 p.m., Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

Open to the public. Registration is appreciated, but not required. 

Vijay Gupta is a violinist whose interest in neurobiology and mental health issues has made him a world-renowned advocate for the regenerative power of music. Gupta joined the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 2007 at age 19, after having completed an undergraduate degree in biology from Marist College and a master’s degree in violin performance from the Yale School of Music. As a 2011 TED Senior Fellow, Gupta founded and began directing Street Symphony, a non-profit organization dedicated to engaging underserved communities experiencing mental illness, homelessness and incarceration in Los Angeles through musical performance and dialogue.

Lunch provided; first come, first served.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.


*Events marked with an asterisk can be counted toward the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate for Jefferson students. 

Please note: Events are added to the calendar as they are confirmed. Please check regularly for additional events. 

To see a list of Past Events, go to the tab at the left.


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