Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University

Jefferson Humanities & Health

Jefferson Humanities & Health supports student engagement in the arts and humanities to promote essential skills related to healthcare including close observation, critical thinking, communication and empathy.

Throughout the year, our programs highlight the social contexts of health and wellness, lived experiences of diverse individuals and communities, and self-care for health professionals.

Each academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum explores a thought-provoking theme from a wide range of perspectives. During the 2018-2019 academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum investigates the theme Fusion

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Throughout the year, forum events will inquire into aspects of Fusion, including:

  • Collaborations across disciplines resulting in new knowledge, methods and ways of knowing
  • Creative thinking at the intersection of broadly different fields and industries
  • Unconventional combinations of technique, style and perspective

Students are invited to complete the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending eight (8) Jefferson Humanities & Health events during the academic year and completing a portfolio of four (4) reflective essays in response. Registration for the 2018-2019 certificate program is now open.  

CLICK HERE to learn more and register for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate. 

Questions? Contact Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Megan.Voeller@jefferson.edu.  


Please Note: Jefferson Humanities & Health events are only open to students unless otherwise indicated.

Announcements

Follow us! @JeffersonHumanities is the official instagram account of Jefferson Humanities & Health. We'll post about events, special programs, and all humanities-related events at Jefferson.

The Empathy Project, a collaboration between Jefferson and Lantern Theater Company initiated by Dr. Sal Mangione, seeks to foster empathy and tolerance for ambiguity among health professions students using the tools and techniques of the theatrical form. The project consists of a series of workshops designed to introduce Jefferson students and health professionals to the theatrical form, explore the basic tools of actors and playwrights, and guide them through the writing and staging of original short plays.

Fall 2018 Schedule

Mon., Sep. 24, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Oct. 1, 7-9:30 p.m. 
Mon., Oct. 8, 7-9:30 p.m.  
Mon., Oct. 15, 7-9:30 p.m.  
Mon., Nov. 12, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Nov. 26, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Dec. 3, 7-9:30 p.m.
Mon., Dec. 10, 7-9:30 p.m.

Learn more

What will the next century look like as we tackle challenges in health care related to quality, access and cost? Jefferson invites you to consider this question in the 2100: A Health Odyssey writing competition! Submit an original science fiction short story exploring a brave, new world of medicine by December 1 for a chance to win $10,000. Learn more HERE

Jefferson students can take advantage of student discounts and pay-as-you-wish programs at many Philadelphia cultural organizations, including theaters and museums. For a select list of such programs, click here and scroll to Arts & Humanities. 

October

Thursday, October 18, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Hamilton 505

Presented by the Graduate Student Association and Jefferson Humanities & Health

Maiken Scott, host of WHYY's The Pulse, will kickstart GSA's Science Outreach and Communication initiative with this seminar-style event. She will share her experience as a radio host and science communicator and explain how she thinks about the challenging work of communicating scientific research to the public. 

Refreshments will be provided.

For more information, email tess.cherlin@jefferson.edu

Thursday, October 18, 12-3 p.m., JAH Atrium

The Jefferson College of Nursing Poverty Simulation is open to all Jefferson students. Register HERE.

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line? (The poverty line is currently $24,600 per year for a family of four, and $16,240 for a family of two.) In addition, Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among large cities in the U.S. Deep poverty is defined as living below half of the poverty line, meaning that many families are living on less than $8-12,000 a year in Philadelphia. This experience of poverty has far reaching implications - even towards long term health and survival.  

JCN will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall and winter to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Students will work on teams to navigate a month in the life of particular families. Students are given a family structure to work within (kids, older parents, single parented etc), and a dollar amount for the month. Staff will be in the room to simulate the various tasks, government agencies and hurdles in daily life.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Friday, October 19, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton 505

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP is appreciated, but not required. Learn more HERE

Anne Basting is a theater artist and educator demonstrating the potential of storytelling and creative expression to improve the lives of elders experiencing cognitive impairment. Across a variety of platforms, including collaborative public performance and academic research, Basting has developed an alternative concept of aging that focuses on its possibilities as well as its challenges. Basting is Professor of Theater in the Peck School of the Arts at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, founder and president of TimeSlips Creative Storytelling, and a 2016 MacArthur Fellow.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

14th Soul of Medicine Brunch: Preparing to Serve Over a Lifetime, Protecting Yourself as You Bear Witness
Sunday, October 21, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., College of Physicians, 19 S. 22nd Street

Free for Jefferson students. Pre-registration required HERE.

Medical students and seasoned clinicians will share stories that have inspired and challenged them. We will discuss strategies that allow us to serve others with integrity, absolute respect and unconditional positive regard while avoiding burnout and compassion fatigue.

Keynote speaker: Ken Ginsberg. Dr Ginsburg specializes in Adolescent Medicine at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and is The Health Services Director at Covenant House Pennsylvania, where he serves homeless, trafficked, and marginalized youth. 

Sponsored by Physicians for Social Responsibility Philadelphia.

Monday, October 22, 5-8 p.m., BLSB 107

Open to all Jefferson students. No registration required.

QUEST "is the moving documentary portrait of the Rainey family living in North Philadelphia. Beginning at the dawn of the Obama presidency, Christopher “Quest” Rainey and his wife, Christine’a “Ma Quest,” raise a family while nurturing a community of hip hop artists in their home music studio. It's a safe space where all are welcome, but this creative sanctuary can’t always shield them from the strife that grips their neighborhood. Epic in scope, QUEST is a vivid illumination of race and class in America, and a testament to love, healing and hope." Learn More.

After the screening, we will have a short discussion about the media's role in constructing narratives of families in disenfranchised neighborhoods. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, October 22, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading. See the Health Humanities Reading Group page for a list and summary of the readings.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Sunday, October 28, 1:30 p.m.
Meet at Ratchada Thai Restaurant (1117 S. 11th St.)

The tour and all food is free for Jefferson students, but tickets are limited and pre-registration required. Registration is available HERE

Join fellow Jefferson students for a private food tour of South Philadelphia's Asian cuisine! Mention the words “South Philly” and almost everyone immediately pictures the Italian Market. Yet, nestled in and around the market is outstanding Asian cuisine. On this tour, we'll get a taste of various cultures and culinary traditions. As a special treat, this is the only tour in Philadelphia that is granted access to a Buddhist temple.

Philly's Asian Cuisine tour will visit:

  • A Thai restaurant to sample three delicious Thai appetizers in the lavishly decorated dining room.
  • A Vietnamese restaurant to enjoy a scrumptious and exquisitely made roasted pork Banh Mi (Vietnamese hoagie).
  • One of the area's best Indian restaurants to enjoy two fantastic appetizers and a delicious dessert.
  • A Buddhist temple to see its elaborate and ornate interior. There, we'll share some fascinating facts about the symbolism and meaning of ceremonial items. This is a rare opportunity you won't want to miss.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, October 29, 5-6:30 p.m.
JAH Atrium

Refreshments will be served prior to the Story Slam from 4:30-5 p.m. Free and open to all Jefferson students, faculty and staff. RSVP appreciated, but not required.

Join us for the second annual Resilience Story Slam! Jefferson clinicians share stories that address the critical balance for health professionals between the profound meaning and joy that come with providing care and the necessity for resilience in response to the stresses of caregiving. Story Slams involve a series of speakers presenting five-minute stories that revolve around a particular theme. This interdisciplinary event will showcase perspectives from a variety of health professions.

Featuring:

  • Karen Alexander, PhD, RN, Jefferson College of Nursing
  • Rachel Brandoff, PhD, ATR-BC, ATCS, LCAT, Jefferson College of Health Professions, Community and Trauma Counseling
  • Rebecca Brown, OTS, and Cerissa Zenor Clark, OTS, Jefferson College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Occupational Therapy
  • Rosemary (Rosie) Frasso, PhD, CPH, Jefferson College of Population Health
  • Barbara Hackley, CNM, PhD, Jefferson College of Health Professions, Midwifery and Women’s Health
  • Amber E. King, PharmD, BCPS, Jefferson College of Pharmacy
  • Adesola Oje, MS4, Sidney Kimmel Medical College
  • John M. Spandorfer, MD, Sidney Kimmel Medical College
  • Michael S. Weinstein, MD, MBE, MPH, FACS, FCCM, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Surgery

Organized by SKMC Wellness, Jefferson Humanities & Health and the Jefferson Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education

This Story Slam counts for 5 Employee Wellness Points; under “Lunch and Learn,” select “Story Slam.”

Questions? Contact Stephanie Battistone, Undergraduate Medical Education Coordinator, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Stephanie.Battistone@jefferson.edu

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

November

Monday, November 5, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton 212

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Wednesday, November 7, 5-7:30 p.m., JAH Brent Auditorium

All attendees must be registered for the Leadership LIVE program. RSVP HERE

The current political climate has individuals paying special attention to issues that affect individuals at personal, national, and global levels. Featuring Amanda Owens, the Executive Director of the Justice Bell Foundation, this program will examine gender inequality and what it means for all of us, particularly as future healthcare and industry leaders. Participants will be asked to engage in introspection on their current perceptions and knowledge of the landscape of equal rights.

This interactive discussion will be followed by a screening of the documentary film Equal Means Equal, which presents “an unflinching look at how women are treated in the United States today. Examining both real-life stories and precedent-setting legal cases, director Kamala Lopez uncovers how outdated and discriminatory attitudes inform and influence seemingly disparate issues…”  Following the film, participants will be asked to consider their reaction to what they saw, reflect on how their perspective may have changed, and discuss how they can become further engaged.  

*Students may earn dual credit for both the Leadership LIVE certificate and the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

The Politics of Health: A conversation with Jonathan Metzl and others about the social and political construction of "health"
Thursday, November 8, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Slought (4017 Walnut St.)

Open to the public. Learn more HERE.

Slought and the Health Ecologies Lab are pleased to announce The Politics of Health, a conversation with Jonathan Metzl and others about the social and political construction of "health." Metzl writes at the intersection of psychiatry, the history and sociology of science, and contemporary politics. In books such as The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease (2010) and Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality (2010), Metzl offers fundamental insights into the way in which healthcare exacerbates disparities. His forthcoming book, Dying of Whiteness: How the Politics of Racial Resentment Is Killing America's Heartland (2019), analyzes the health effects of white supremacy in the era of Trump. This event, which will take place two days after the US midterm elections, will also engage the results of the election and strategies going forward.

Dying of Whiteness (2019) analyzes the consequences of right-wing backlash policies under Donald Trump's pledge to make American lives great again. Through a series of interviews, Metzl examines the impact of racial resentment on public policy, gun laws, the Affordable Care Act, schools and social services. Not only does he reveal the ties between policy and racial resentment, he also unveils the costs of these policies, including increasing deaths by gun suicide, falling life expectancies, and rising dropout rates. Metzl argues that Trump's policies, while promising to change lives for the better, are in reality fueled by racial hierarchies which profoundly undermine the health of America's Heartland. Join us for this timely conversation about Dying of Whiteness and Metzl's longstanding engagement with the politics of health.

This event is co-presented with Jefferson Humanities & Health and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, and is the first of two events featuring sustained conversations with Metzl. The conversation with Metzl at Slought will be moderated by Michelle Munyikwa, an MD/PhD Student in Anthropology, and Aaron Levy, Senior Lecturer in English and History of Art, University of Pennsylvania.

Walk in My Shoes: Philadelphia Police Officers and People in Communities of Color Share Their Personal Stories
Friday, November 9, 7 p.m., Eakins Lounge

This event is free and open to the Jefferson community and the public. Tickets are limited and pre-registration is required HERE.

What are the healing stories that we need to hear now? Come to the first public screening of the Theater of Witness film Walk in My Shoes based on the production created and performed by Philadelphia police and people in communities of color. The original performance is based on the performers’ true stories of how historical racism, poverty, trauma, inequality, safety, injustice and heroism intersect in the lives of both police and community members. Performed by the people themselves, this provocative film moves the heart as well as the mind. Watch the trailer for Walk in My Shoes

Following the film, producers Police Inspector Altovise Love-Craighead and Artistic Director Teya Sepinuck, as well as the performers, will speak about the deep connections they made as they listened and created this historic production together.

About Theater of Witness: 
Theater of Witness brings people together across divides of difference to bear witness to the beauty of meaningful engagement, cultivate empathy and truly listen to the stories of people we’ve never heard before. Without shying away from the painful wounds of our society, Theater of Witness offers a new story. One that taps into the spirit of love and connection between us all.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Inis Nua Reading Series: Medicine in Modern Life
Play reading: The Effect by Lucy Prebble
Monday, November 12, 7 p.m., Drake Theatres (302 South Hicks St.)

Inis Nua’s 2018-2019 Reading Series takes a look at how medical and scientific advances have shaped our lives. Exploring how we are affected by the illnesses we suffer, the treatment we receive, and the motivations of those who treat us, three very different stories show the problems created by some of the solutions of science and medicine.

This theme is echoed in The Effect, by Lucy Prebble: “When Connie and Tristan meet on a paid overnight drug trial, the chemistry isn’t immediate. But when a romance starts to develop under these strange conditions, it’s hard to tell what is a genuine emotion and what is just a side effect.”

No registration required. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Rebecca Harris (rebecca.e.harris@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. 

Thursday, November 15, 1-4 p.m., Hamilton 1st Floor

The Jefferson College of Nursing Poverty Simulation is open to all Jefferson students. Register HERE.

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line? (The poverty line is currently $24,600 per year for a family of four, and $16,240 for a family of two.) In addition, Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among large cities in the U.S. Deep poverty is defined as living below half of the poverty line, meaning that many families are living on less than $8-12,000 a year in Philadelphia. This experience of poverty has far reaching implications - even towards long term health and survival.  

JCN will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall and winter to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Students will work on teams to navigate a month in the life of particular families. Students are given a family structure to work within (kids, older parents, single parented etc), and a dollar amount for the month. Staff will be in the room to simulate the various tasks, government agencies and hurdles in daily life.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, November 19, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: From Self-Criticism to Self-Compassion
Monday, November 19, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available HERE starting October 15.

We all have inner critics that compare how we are with how we think we should be. While this tendency to judge and evaluate ourselves can be a source of motivation, it can also undermine our sense of self-worth and make us feel “not good enough” in many areas of our lives. This workshop will focus on how to shift from viewing ourselves through a lens of criticism to a lens of compassion. We will utilize writing and music to challenge perfectionism and promote self-acceptance.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by 3 creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event

Tuesday, November 20, 12-3 p.m., JAH Atrium

The Jefferson College of Nursing Poverty Simulation is open to all Jefferson students. Register HERE.

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line? (The poverty line is currently $24,600 per year for a family of four, and $16,240 for a family of two.) In addition, Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among large cities in the U.S. Deep poverty is defined as living below half of the poverty line, meaning that many families are living on less than $8-12,000 a year in Philadelphia. This experience of poverty has far reaching implications - even towards long term health and survival.  

JCN will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall and winter to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Students will work on teams to navigate a month in the life of particular families. Students are given a family structure to work within (kids, older parents, single parented etc), and a dollar amount for the month. Staff will be in the room to simulate the various tasks, government agencies and hurdles in daily life.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, November 26, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

December

Monday, December 3, 12-1 p.m., JAH M23

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Wednesday, December 5, 12-1 p.m., Eakins Lounge, Jefferson Alumni Hall

Alan Lightman, who worked for many years as a theoretical physicist, is the author of six novels, including the international bestseller Einstein’s Dreams, as well as The Diagnosis, a finalist for the National Book Award. He has taught at Harvard and at MIT, where he was the first person to receive a dual faculty appointment in science and the humanities. He is currently professor of the practice of the humanities at MIT. In 2018, he published two new books: Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine, about science, religion, and their different ways of knowing the world, and In Praise of Wasting Time. He is also the founder of the Harpswell Foundation, an organization devoted to the advancement of women in Southeast Asia.

This event is open to the public.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Creative Approaches to Self-Care: Transforming Mental and Emotional States
Monday, December 10, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Pre-registration required. Registration will be available HERE starting November 5.

When life gets stressful and the pressures of school, work and home life are piling up, it’s easy to get stuck in negative emotions and self-defeating thoughts. This workshop will utilize art and music to break up mental and emotional stuck points and introduce new ways of rejuvenating our spirits.

About Creative Approaches to Self Care:
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by 3 creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Instructors: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC; Rebekka Dietrich-Hartwell, DMT-BC, LPC; Adenike Webb, MMT, MT-BC; Cindy Savett

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Monday, December 10, 12-1 p.m., Scott 200A

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students and faculty/staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Each week, a brief reading is posted in advance on Blackboard within the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization, then discussed during the meeting. Participants may self-enroll in the Blackboard organization, or email Megan Voeller at megan.voeller@jefferson.edu to request the reading.

Lunch provided; first-come, first-served. No RSVP required.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Tuesday, December 18, 12-3 p.m., JAH Atrium

The Jefferson College of Nursing Poverty Simulation is open to all Jefferson students. Register HERE.

Did you know that 40% of children residing in Philadelphia live below the poverty line? (The poverty line is currently $24,600 per year for a family of four, and $16,240 for a family of two.) In addition, Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among large cities in the U.S. Deep poverty is defined as living below half of the poverty line, meaning that many families are living on less than $8-12,000 a year in Philadelphia. This experience of poverty has far reaching implications - even towards long term health and survival.  

JCN will be running a Poverty Simulation this fall and winter to expose students to the realities of living with a limited income. Students will work on teams to navigate a month in the life of particular families. Students are given a family structure to work within (kids, older parents, single parented etc), and a dollar amount for the month. Staff will be in the room to simulate the various tasks, government agencies and hurdles in daily life.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.


*Events marked with an asterisk can be counted toward the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate for Jefferson students. 

Please note: Events are added to the calendar as they are confirmed. Please check regularly for additional events. 

To see a list of Past Events, go to the tab at the left.


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