Thomas Jefferson University

Past Events

2020-2021

October

Drawing to Decompress with Dr. Nazanin Moghbeli

Wednesday, October 28, 5-6 p.m., Zoom (register here

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Explore the ways in which a drawing practice can bring balance to your healthcare studies or career. Artist and cardiologist Nazanin Moghbeli, MD, FACC, uses art to inspire, decompress, and deepen curiosity about the human body and medicine. Join Dr. Moghbeli for a workshop that will build on this wisdom to expand participants’ observational skills, promote self-care, and encourage burnout prevention. All drawing abilities and experiences are welcome! This workshop will discuss basic drawing techniques, composition, subject matter, three-dimensionality, and tips for forming a daily sketchbook practice.

Materials will be available for pick-up prior to the workshop, including: a small sketchbook and portable pocket version, drawing pencils, eraser, and two printed images.

About the facilitator: Nazanin Moghbeli, MD, FACC is an Iranian-American artist and cardiologist, and the director of the Cardiac Care Unit at Einstein Medical Center.

See Dr. Moghbeli's work featured in Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth's Literary and Art Journal here, or more on her website here.

**Register through Eventbrite to receive a Zoom link for this virtual program**

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Schwartz Rounds: From Apathy to Action

Wednesday, October 28, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (registration link in Canvas, see instructions below)

Join us for our monthly Schwartz rounds to discuss how our panelists and attendees have turned personal feelings of apathy into action for change!

The Schwartz Rounds program offers healthcare providers a regularly scheduled time during their fast-paced work lives to openly and honestly discuss the social and emotional issues they face in caring for patients and families. In contrast to traditional medical rounds, the focus is on the human dimension of medicine. Caregivers have an opportunity to share their experiences, thoughts and feelings on thought-provoking topics drawn from actual patient cases. The premise is that caregivers are better able to make personal connections with patients and colleagues when they have greater insight into their own responses and feelings.

Panelists from diverse disciplines participate in the sessions, including physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, allied health professionals and chaplains. After listening to a panel’s brief presentation on an identified case or topic, caregivers in the audience are invited to share their own perspectives on the case and broader related issues.

Presented by the Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine; Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD.

To access the registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Schwartz Rounds page in the Event Links module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event.

Story Initiative Panel: Diversity & Activism in Children’s Storytelling

Monday, October 26, 5-6 p.m., Zoom (register
here)

Free and open to all Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

The Story Initiative presents a panel of award-winning children's book authors and illustrators aimed to highlight the importance of diverse representation in children's literature. Panelists will discuss their work, creative process, and impact on the world of storytelling, followed by an interactive Q&A session with the audience.

About the Panelists

Vashti Harrison is a New York Times best-selling author, writer, and filmmaker. Her debut book, Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History, celebrates trailblazing black women in America and marked the beginning of her growing "Little Leaders & Dreamers" series. She is also the illustrator of Hair Love, the book version of the Academy Award-winning short film. In 2020, Harrison was awarded the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Award and the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Children's Literary Work for Sulwe, a collaboration with actress Lupita Nyong'o.

John Parra is an award-winning illustrator best known for his work for Latino-themed children's books including Waiting for the Biblioburro, Green is a Chili Pepper, and Frida Khalo and her Animalitos. He is a three-time recipient of the American Library Association's Pura Belpré Award and a two-time recipient of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators' Golden Kite Award. His artwork has also been featured in numerous galleries and museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Saadia Faruqi is an interfaith activist and Pakistani-American author. Her Yasmin book series celebrates Muslim and Pakistani culture and teaches Urdu, the national language of Pakistan, to early readers. A Place at the Table, her collaboration with Laura Shovan, explores the lives of first-generation immigrants and multicultural friendship. She is the current editor-in-chief of Blue Minaret, a magazine for Muslim art, poetry, and pose.

About the Organization

The Story Initiative is a student organization that spans multiple professional colleges within the Thomas Jefferson University system. Students write and illustrate personalized books for children in underprivileged areas, which in turn promotes literacy and fosters creativity in young minds. By reading stories featuring themselves as protagonists, children can build self-confidence, grasp valuable life lessons, and learn to dream big. 

Questions? Reach out to Zoe Wong, Outreach Director, zmw002@students.jefferson.edu.

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual panel.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Better Together Interprofessional Story Slam

Monday, October 26, 4-5:30 p.m., Zoom (registration link in Canvas, instructions below)

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Join us for the fourth annual Interprofessional Story Slam! The year 2020 has challenged our capacities for connection while illuminating as never before the importance of teamwork, solidarity and simply being together. People are social creatures, and there are health risks in letting our connections with others diminish. Jefferson faculty, students and alumni share stories exploring the theme, “Better Together,” and how we create connections and build relationships during the coronavirus pandemic, stand with each other for social justice and health equity, and care for our patients, our communities, our families and ourselves.

Featuring:

  • Patricia Churchill, PharmD, Jefferson College of Pharmacy ’19
  • Denine Crittendon, MPH, PhD (cand.), Lecturer, Public Health, College of Population Health
  • Eleanor Fitzpatrick, DNP, RN, ACNP, AGCNS, CCRN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
  • George James Jr., PsyD, LMFT, Assistant Professor, Department of Counseling & Behavioral Health, Jefferson College of Health Professions
  • Toni Okuboyejo, MS3, Sidney Kimmel Medical College
  • Bobbie Posmontier, PhD, CNM, PMHNP-BC, FAAN, Professor and Program Director of the PhD in Nursing, Jefferson College of Nursing
  • Mary M. Stephens, MD, MPH, FAAFP, Associate Professor, Family and Community Medicine, Medical Director, Jefferson Continuing Care Program
  • Megan Stobart-Gallagher, DO, Associate Residency Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
  • Kristen Stout, PT, DPT, Clinical Team Leader, Rehabilitation Medicine

To access the registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Better Together Interprofessional Story Slam page in the Event Links module. 

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Sara Jensen Carr: Embodied Environments

Wednesday, October 21, 5-6 p.m., Zoom (register here)

Free and open to the public

Sara Jensen Carr explores how disease has historically affected urban design practice and what role the current pandemic might play in altering the built environment. Our changing understanding of the reciprocal relationship between the environment and the body is reflected in the palimpsest of our urban landscape. Concepts of wellness, disease, and treatment have influenced design from the Industrial Revolution to today, the results ranging from successful to unwittingly incubating the next generation of illnesses. As we face another epoch in the parallel histories of public health and the public realm, examining our built environment through this lens is necessary to frame today’s urgent questions of social equity, climate change, and post-pandemic design practice.

Sara Jensen Carr, PhD, ASLA, is Assistant Professor of Architecture, Urbanism, and Landscape and Program Director, Master of Design in Sustainable Urban Environments in the School of Architecture at Northeastern University. Carr’s forthcoming book, The Topography of Wellness: Health and the American Urban Landscape (University of Virginia Press, Fall 2020) examines how landscape and architecture have responded to six historical urban epidemics, from cholera to obesity.

This talk and Q+A will be moderated by Grace Ong Yan, PhD, Assistant Professor of Interior Design and Interior Architecture Programs at Thomas Jefferson University. Ong Yan is an architectural historian with a forthcoming book, Building Brands: Corporations and Modern Architecture (Lund Humphries, Fall 2020).

Co-presented by Jefferson Humanities & Health and the College of Architecture and the Built Environment.

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Virtual Cooking with Vetri: Eat a Rainbow

Tuesday, October 20, 5 p.m.

For Zoom link/instructions, email Angelina Seeney, Assistant Director of Wellness Programs, to register.

Featured Recipe: Rainbow Farro Salad with Chimichurri Chicken

The Jefferson Recreation & Fitness Center is teaming up with Vetri Mobile Teaching Kitchen to provide FREE online cooking workshops. These programs will teach employees and students the basics of cooking in a fresh and healthy manner. You can choose to cook along with the chefs, or just watch and learn. You will be supplied with an ingredient list and a list of kitchen supplies you will need on hand.  

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Creating Balance

Monday, October 19, 5-6 p.m., Zoom (register here)

Free and open to Jefferson students

Juggling school along with other life commitments is a challenge that can leave us feeling stressed and pulled in different directions. In this movement-based workshop, we will practice exercises that promote an awareness of what balance actually feels and looks like. We will explore setting boundaries, how to prevent burnout, and how to recognize, listen to and meet our own needs. Instructor: Emily Nussdorfer, ADTR

About the Creative Approaches to Self Care workshop series:

In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Co-presented with the Student Personal Counseling Center (SPCC).

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual workshop.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Special Olympics Selective Kickoff: Patient Panel Event

Thursday, October 15, 6:30-8 p.m., Online (register here)

Hoping to better serve patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities? Want to make a difference when it comes to health disparities? Please join the Special Olympics Selective planning committee for a panel featuring Special Olympics athletes, staff, and healthcare providers! Open to all students, residents, and fellows. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn more about the Special Olympics selective, and will be eligible for a certificate of program completion at the end of the academic year.

The panelists will include residents from family medicine, PT/OT, and rehab who have volunteered at Special Olympics in the past, and celebrated athletes from the program themselves! Participants will hear about the mission of Special Olympics and about the opportunities to get involved in the fall and winter. Attendees will learn about disabilities communication skills and will get first-hand accounts from athletes and families about their experiences. 

The conversation will be moderated by Dr. Mary M. Stephens, MD, MPH, FAAFP, Associate Professor, Family and Community Medicine, Medical Director, Jefferson Continuing Care Program, and Dr. Jane Tobias, DNP, RN, MSN, CPNP-PC, Assistant Professor, Jefferson College of Nursing. 

Questions? Contact Dr. Mary Stephens at mary.stephens@jefferson.edu.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Inis Nua Reading Series: Reconceiving Family 

Virtual Play Reading, available  through Sat., Oct. 17

Free and open to the public; register to access the virtual play reading here

Play reading: On the Other Hand, We’re Happy by Daf James (Wales)

Abbie and Josh are adopting a little girl out of foster care. But the process is more challenging than they anticipated and an unexpected tragedy along the way forever shapes their young family.

A virtual play reading will be available for participants from Weds., Oct. 14-Sat., Oct. 17. After viewing the reading, all are welcome to join a casual conversation on Zoom about the play at the Sunday afternoon Teatime Talkback with the artist behind the readings. Register for the 10/18 Teatime Talkback here.

Inis Nua’s 2020-2021 Reading Series will focus on the range of factors at play when starting a family: from economics, to health, to culture, to beliefs. Four thought-provoking plays look at how four different families begin. All readings and Teatime Talkbacks are free for virtual viewing.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after viewing the virtual play reading.

Jefferson Humanities Forum presents Nikole Hannah-Jones: A Conversation on Racial Equity, Health, and Reframing the Legacy of Slavery

Wednesday, October 14, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (register here)

Free and open to the public

The Jefferson Humanities Forum presents 2017 MacArthur Fellow and 2020 Pulitzer Prize winner, investigative journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones. Hannah-Jones created and spearheaded The 1619 Project, a multimedia initiative through The New York Times Magazine that explores slavery’s omnipresent and foundational legacy in American life. Her extensive reporting for The New York Times and other publications reveals how public policy establishes, and maintains, racial segregation in housing and schools. With The 1619 Project, and her work more broadly, Hannah-Jones seeks to reframe historical narratives that overlook the contributions of Black Americans and disregard the present-day impact of structural racism. Her introductory essay for the project earned her this year’s Pulitzer Prize for commentary. In 2015, Hannah-Jones co-founded The Ida B. Wells Society for Investigative Reporting with the goal of increasing the number of reporters and editors of color.

For this event, Ms. Hannah-Jones will be in conversation with Traci R. Trice, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Assistant Dean for Diversity and Student Diversity Programs, Office of Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives, Sidney Kimmel Medical College. 

Each academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum explores a thought-provoking theme from a wide range of perspectives, inviting reflection and action around how we improve lives. During 2020-2021, the Jefferson Humanities Forum investigates the theme Creativity. This event and all Jefferson Humanities Forum events are free and open to the public.

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Exquisite Corpse Drawing Series

Tuesday, October 13, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Zoom (register here

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

“Exquisite corpse” is a drawing game invented by Surrealist artists in the early 1900s. One person draws a head, then conceals her work before passing the sheet of paper on to the next person who draws the figure’s torso. The second person then conceals everything and passes the sheet of paper on to a third person who draws the figure’s legs.  The goal is to use collaboration as a creative tool to generate an image that one could never think up on their own. The final outcomes are meant to be absurd and surprising, and absolutely no artistic experience is needed.

In this fun, low-key session, we'll create several exquisite corpses virtually. All you'll need is white paper (any scrap of computer paper or the back of an envelope will do), a dark-colored pen, and a smartphone.

Upcoming Sessions

  • Tuesday, November 10, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, December 8, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Julia Clift is a Philadelphia-based artist, educator, and writer. Her paintings and drawings have been exhibited in numerous locations, including Arnot Art Museum, Gross McCleaf Gallery, and Fleisher Art Memorial, and are held in the permanent collection of Wythe Hotel (Brooklyn, NY). In 2016, she received a Barbara Deming Memorial Fund Grant for her Woman Drawings series. She has taught painting and drawing at Tyler School of Art and Architecture, Maryland Institute College of Art, and Thomas Jefferson University (Visualizing Anatomy humanities selective).

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Monday, October 12, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (registration and readings in Canvas, see instructions below)

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Reading: Ray, Keisha. (2019). The Power of Black Patients' Testimonies When Teaching Medical Racism. In O. Banner, N. Carlin, T. R. Cole (Eds.), Teaching Health Humanities (p. 129-141). Oxford.

Time: 16min

Leading up to 1619 Project founder Nikole Hannah-Jone’s visit on 10/14, HHRG will pay particular attention to race in medicine, health equity, and education. This week, Dr. Keisha Ray, PhD, joins HHRG to discuss how incorporating Black patients’ testimonies into health education allows students to grasp both the historical and present forms of medical racism, and become better providers for a population long disenfranchised by healthcare. Dr. Ray's chapter also suggests that proper medical racism education has the power to improve care and patient compliance, especially for Black patients, and complicate notions of empathy and intersectionality in healthcare professions.

Special guest discussant: Keisha S. Ray, PhD, Assistant Professor, McGovern Center for Humanities & Ethics at McGovern Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

About HHRG: The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session. 

To access the readings and registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Megan Voeller, and visit the Health Humanities Reading Group page in the Ongoing Programs module. 

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 7 p.m.

Register for the virtual Q&A and discussion via Zoom here

Reserve a free ticket to view the film before the event here

Free and open to the public

For They Know Not What They Do examines the intersection of religion, sexual orientation, and gender identity in America. In the wake of the Supreme Court case legalizing marriage equality, the rights of LGBTQ+ folks have been continuously undermined nationwide. Both faith and law are being invoked by politicians and religious conservatives in their arguments for the “religious freedom” to openly discriminate. FTKNWTD tells the stories of four families struggling with these issues, with close attention on the parents whose queer children are helping them explore a more loving interpretation of scripture and faith. FTKNWTD offers healing, clarity, and understanding to those caught in the crosshairs of scripture, sexuality, and identity.

This online event consists of a Q&A and discussion with two of the people featured in the film, Elliot Porcher and Coleen Stevens Porcher, moderated by Reverend Naomi Washington-Leapheart, the Director for Faith-Based and Interfaith Affairs through the City of Philadelphia.

DocNights is a collaboration between Jefferson, Philadelphia Film Society and William Way LGBT Community Center that showcases four documentaries about diverse issues that members of the LGBTQ+ community experience every day. A Q&A and discussion with filmmakers or documentary subjects will follow each screening.

Co-sponsored by Jefferson Humanities & Health and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives, Sidney Kimmel Medical College.

Please note: Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for the virtual film Q&A and talkback. To reserve a ticket to watch the film before the event, go hereThe film will be available to those who have reserved a ticket from September 30th - October 7th.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Mural Mile Walking Tour

Saturday, October 3, 2-4 p.m., meet at Lubert Plaza (10th and Locust)

Register here

Free and open to Jefferson students

Experience firsthand how art ignites change: explore the world’s largest outdoor art gallery and get to know Philadelphia’s stunning mural collection on a guided walking tour. Weave through neighborhoods on foot and get inspired by the incredible public art that makes Philadelphia the mural capital of the world. Explore neighborhoods in and around Center City, getting up close and personal with murals that tell the intimate and inspiring stories of this multi-faceted city. The Mural Mile highlights art tucked in out-of-the-way corners to soaring additions to the cityscape, like the breath-taking Untitled Amy Sherald Project and Water Gives Life, by Philly’s own Euhri Jones and David McShane. This active 2-hour tour starts at the heart of Jefferson’s campus and explores about 15 murals in Center City. To ensure the safety of all tour guests, a proper face covering is required.

Please note: This event is open to Jefferson students only. Registration is required to receive a free ticket for the tour. Registration for this event closes on Thursday, September 17, at 10am.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Inis Nua Reading Series: Reconceiving Family

Virtual play reading, available through Sat., Oct. 3 

Free and open to the public; register to access the virtual play reading here

Play reading: 3 Billion Seconds by Maud Dromgoole (England)

Daisy and Michael are idealistic climate change activists working to end overpopulation. But when they accidentally get pregnant, the couple will stop at nothing to justify their right to procreate.

A virtual play reading will be available for participants from Weds., Sept. 30-Sat., Oct. 3. After viewing the reading, all are welcome to join a casual conversation on Zoom about the play at the Sunday afternoon Teatime Talkback with the artist behind the readings. Register for the 10/4 Teatime Talkback here.

Inis Nua’s 2020-21 Reconceiving Family Reading Series will focus on the range of factors at play when starting a family: from economics, to health, to culture, to beliefs. Four thought-provoking plays look at how four different families begin. All readings and Teatime Talkbacks are free for virtual viewing.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after viewing the virtual play reading.

September

Why Doctors Write: Panel Discussion 

Tuesday, September 29, 5:30-7 p.m., Zoom (register here)

Free and open to the public

Why Doctors Write: Finding Humanity in Medicine is a documentary short film about the intersection of medicine and literature. It guides viewers into areas of the medical world where creative writing and reflective reading are transforming doctors, medical students, and other healthcare workers. The film makes a case that this growing movement of writing by doctors, and use of literature in hospitals and medical schools, is renewing humanism in medicine at a time when technology, managed care and other constraints encroach upon the doctor-patient connection. 

This event will feature an excerpt of the film and a discussion with the following panelists:

  • Ken Browne, Why Doctors Write filmmaker
  • Kath Hubbard, MA, Teaching Lecturer of Writing and Rhetoric, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Marcin Chwistek, MD, FAAHPM, Director, Supportive Oncology and Palliative Care Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center
  • Miranda Haslam, fourth year medical student, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University
  • Naomi Rosenberg, MD, Assistant Professor, Clinical Emergency Medicine, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Assistant Director of Narrative Medicine, Lewis Katz School of Medicine
  • Rosalind Kaplan, MD, FACP, MFA , Adjunct Instructor, Medical Memoir, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Shruthi Deivasigamani, third year medical student at Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University

Why Doctors Write is supported by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, and The Josh and Judy Weston Foundation and produced in association with the Center for Independent Documentary. 

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual discussion.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Monday, September 28, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (registration and readings in Canvas, see instructions below)

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Reading/Listening:

Time: 40 min of reading and listening

Leading up to 1619 Project founder Nikole Hannah-Jone’s visit on 10/14, HHRG will pay particular attention to race in medicine, health equity, and education. This week, the Health Humanities Reading Group explores the life and legacy of Henrietta Lacks, whose cervical cells, taken and used without her knowledge, have played a role in modernity as we know it: from vaccines to medicine to space travel. Lacks’ story is unique but also representative of the pervasive mistreatment of Black people by institutions of medicine, science, education, and healthcare.

Special guest discussant: Ana Mari­a Lopez, MD, MPH, MACP, Professor and Vice Chair, Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Chief of Cancer Services, Jefferson Health New Jersey, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center

About HHRG: The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session. 

To access the readings and registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Megan Voeller, and visit the Health Humanities Reading Group page in the Ongoing Programs module. 

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Exquisite Corpse Drawing Series

Tuesday, September 22, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Zoom (register here

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

“Exquisite corpse” is a drawing game invented by Surrealist artists in the early 1900s. One person draws a head, then conceals her work before passing the sheet of paper on to the next person who draws the figure’s torso. The second person then conceals everything and passes the sheet of paper on to a third person who draws the figure’s legs.  The goal is to use collaboration as a creative tool to generate an image that one could never think up on their own. The final outcomes are meant to be absurd and surprising, and absolutely no artistic experience is needed.

In this fun, low-key session, we'll create several exquisite corpses virtually. All you'll need is white paper (any scrap of computer paper or the back of an envelope will do), a dark-colored pen, and a smartphone.

Upcoming Sessions

  • Tuesday, October 13, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, November 10, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, December 8, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Julia Clift is a Philadelphia-based artist, educator, and writer. Her paintings and drawings have been exhibited in numerous locations, including Arnot Art Museum, Gross McCleaf Gallery, and Fleisher Art Memorial, and are held in the permanent collection of Wythe Hotel (Brooklyn, NY). In 2016, she received a Barbara Deming Memorial Fund Grant for her Woman Drawings series. She has taught painting and drawing at Tyler School of Art and Architecture, Maryland Institute College of Art, and Thomas Jefferson University (Visualizing Anatomy humanities selective).

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Connecting

Monday, September 21, 5-6 p.m., Zoom (register here)

Free and open to Jefferson students


Research has shown that our relationships with ourselves, others, and even nature have a profound impact on physical health and psychological well-being. In this workshop we will use art to explore ways of building and maintaining this all-important sense of connection. Instructor: Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC

About the Creative Approaches to Self Care workshop series:

In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by three creative arts therapists and a poet, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion. 

Co-presented with the Student Personal Counseling Center (SPCC).

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual workshop.

*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Monday, September 21, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (registration and readings in Canvas, see instructions below)

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Reading: Watson, Katie. (2011). “Serious Play: Teaching Medical Skills with Improvisation Theater Techniques.” Academic Medicine, 86 (10), p. 1260-1265. 

Time: 16 min read

In "Serious Play," Professor Katie Watson, lawyer and bioethicist, describes her medical improv course at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and presents the importance of introducing medical students to improvisational technique and practice. Watson argues that improv develops active listening, collaboration, observation, and one's propensity to deal with unpredictability—all integral, and often untaught, skills needed for well-rounded medical practice.

Special guest discussant: Katie Watson, JD, Associate Professor of Medical Social Sciences, Medical Education and Obstetrics and Gynecology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session. 

To access the readings and registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Megan Voeller, and visit the Health Humanities Reading Group page in the Ongoing Programs module. 



*If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance after the event.

Do No Harm: Virtual Screening and Panel Discussion

Wednesday, September 16, 6-8 p.m., Zoom (registration in Canvas, see instructions below)

Free and open to the public

Doctors take an oath to save lives. Yet, they are taking their own at an alarming rate, trapped in a health care system that not only puts their lives at risk but the patients they serve.

In this groundbreaking film, Do No Harm, medical students, residents, practicing physicians, renowned authors and leaders of top medical organizations pull back the curtain on today’s toxic culture of medicine. From bullying, burnout, exceptionally high rates of depression, isolation and sleep deprivation in medical school, to the stigma of reaching out for emotional help, we explore both the internal and external challenges physicians face in an increasingly corporate healthcare system. The film follows four people bonded by tragedy on a mission to expose medicine’s hidden epidemic of suicide and depression

Join us for a virtual screening and live panel discussion featuring the following Jefferson physicians and practitioners, moderated by Matt Wintersteen, PhD:

  • Emily Lisco, MD
  • John Liantonio, MD, MBA, HMDC
  • Megan Sobart-Gallagher, DO, FAAEM, FACEP
  • Shawn Blue, PsyD

This event will take place live via Zoom; pre-registration is required. The moderator, Dr. Matt Wintersteen, will coordinate the start time by telling participants when to begin watching the film on their personal devices. We will keep the “chat” feature open throughout the film and encourage people to share reactions and ask questions in real time. 

Sponsored by the Jefferson Counseling Center (SCC) & Graduate Medical Education (GME) Programs. Questions? Reach out to Justin.Holman@jefferson.edu

To access the registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Do No Harm page in the Event Links module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event. When you email, please format the subject line as: "Asano credit for [Event Title] and [Date]".

Jefferson Humanities Forum: Dave Isay

Wednesday, September 16, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (register here)

The Jefferson Humanities Forum presents Dave Isay, founder of StoryCorps and one of the most trusted and respected broadcasters working today. The recipient of six Peabody Awards, a MacArthur Fellow, and the $1 Million TED prize, Isay taps into the heart and soul of the human experience through his work as an author, documentarian and founder of StoryCorps. Since its inception in 2003, StoryCorps has given nearly half a million Americans the chance to record interviews about their lives, pass wisdom from one generation to the next, and leave a legacy for the future. It is the largest single collection of human voices ever gathered. Weekly, millions of listeners experience these stories on NPR’s Morning Edition. Isay has numerous books lauded as best-sellers by The New York Times, including Listening is an Act of Love, Ties That Bind: Stories of Love and Gratitude from the First Ten Years of StoryCorps, and Callings: The Purpose and Passion of Work. 

Developed in March 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, StoryCorps Connect is a first-of-its kind platform that enables you to record a StoryCorps interview with a loved one remotely using video conference technology.

AAMC Call for Submissions: Stories and Poems During These Critical Times

The AAMC, in partnership with StoryCorps and the NEA, is seeking oral and 55-word stories for collaborative listening and story sharing that explore the lived experiences of our diverse constituents. Through a mix of media and forms—visual imagery, poetry, and storytelling—the AAMC is seeking a diverse range of voices and perspectives to honor and chronicle our community at this unprecedented time. Submit your 55-word story or poem here. Learn more about conducting a StoryCorps oral interview here

Each academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum explores a thought-provoking theme from a wide range of perspectives, inviting reflection and action around how we improve lives. During 2020-2021, the Jefferson Humanities Forum investigates the theme Creativity. This event and all Jefferson Humanities Forum events are free and open to the public.

Register through Eventbrite to receive the Zoom link for this virtual event.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event.

Neurodiversity Symposium: Round Table Discussion

Monday, September 14, 12:20-1:10 p.m., Zoom

Learn more and register for the symposium here.

All of the speakers from the four days of panels will come together for a round table discussion to conclude the Neurodiversity Symposium, moderated by the three co-organizers, Severino Alfonso, Dr. Wendy Ross, and Loukia Tsafoulia.

More about the Symposium

The College of Architecture and the Built Environment and Jefferson Center for Autism and Neurodiversity are teaming up to present a four-day, cross-disciplinary symposium to explore how to design inclusive environments, especially for neurodiverse individuals and those with autism. The symposium will bring together designers, medical field experts, people with Autism Spectrum Disorder, and caregivers. A round table discussion with speakers from the four days of panels will conclude the event on Monday, September 14. This event is free and open to the public.

Register through Eventbrite to receive a detailed schedule and the Zoom link.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this specific lecture. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event. When you email, please format the subject line as: "Asano credit for [Event Title] and [Date]".

Neurodiversity Symposium: Reflecting on the ADA and Those Left Behind

Saturday, September 12, 11:30-12:20 p.m., Zoom 

Learn more and register for the symposium here.

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 has been foundational in raising social awareness of the accessibility needs of the millions of people in the United States living with disabilities. Resulting policies and building codes since the Act’s adoption have allowed a previously marginalized and isolated population to engage in their communities and remain independent and included. However, many unmet accommodations remain for people across the spectrum of neurodiversity, namely those with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD); we have yet to fully recognize the essential needs of those with social, sensory and cognitive vulnerabilities within the built environment. We must challenge the American with Disabilities Design Guide to incorporate evidence-based recommendations to reflect a broader range and depth of disability priorities. Such efforts rely on engaging city planners, architects, designers, educators, public health advocates and thought leaders to consider broader definitions of vulnerable populations and those deserving of consideration in all community spaces, whether currently standing or yet to be imagined.

Eron Friedlaender, MD, MPH, is a Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and an attending physician in the Division of Emergency Medicine at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Her research has centered on how conditions in the built environment relate to injury risk as well as documenting ways in which individuals with autism are vulnerable within health care systems.

More about the Symposium

The College of Architecture and the Built Environment and Jefferson Center for Autism and Neurodiversity are teaming up to present a four-day, cross-disciplinary symposium to explore how to design inclusive environments, especially for neurodiverse individuals and those with autism. The symposium will bring together designers, medical field experts, people with Autism Spectrum Disorder, and caregivers. A round table discussion with speakers from the four days of panels will conclude the event on Monday, September 14. This event is free and open to the public.

Register through Eventbrite to receive a detailed schedule and the Zoom link.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this specific lecture. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event. When you email, please format the subject line as: "Asano credit for [Event Title] and [Date]".

Neurodiversity Symposium: Space Inclusivity and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Friday, September 11, 10-11:15 a.m., Zoom

Learn more and register for the symposium here.

On Friday, September 11, from 10-11:15 a.m., listen to two talks and then an InDialogue session with the three speakers.

  • “Dialectical Design Thinking: Towards Space Inclusivity,” presented by two of the symposium’s co-organizers Severino Alfonso and Loukia Tsafoulia, will provide context about the history of cross-disciplinary efforts within the design field to address all-inclusive ways for inhabiting and perceiving our environments. Alfonso and Tsafoulia are registered architects, educators, and researchers. They are the founders of PLB studio, an architecture and research practice and Assistant Professors at the College of Architecture and the Built Environment, Thomas Jefferson University where they founded the Synesthetic Research and Design Lab.
  • “The Other, Binary Thinking, A True Spectrum: My Autism Diagnosis Story,” presented by Rachel Updegrove explores coming to terms with an autism diagnosis at the age of 23. Updegrove is graduate of the College of Architecture and the Built Environment, Thomas Jefferson University and currently works at HERA Laboratory Planners.
  • Following both talks, the three discussants will be in dialogue with each other.

This is the kick-off of the four-day Neurodiversity Symposium: Building Community and Rethinking the Built Environment! The daily format for the symposium is conversational, pairing speakers from the design fields with speakers from the medical fields as well as speakers with ASD and their caregivers. An InDialogue session in which speakers and design students are engaged in moderated discussions follows each pairing as well as Q&A sessions open to the general audience.

Register through Eventbrite to receive the full schedule and the Zoom link. We are highlighting only a few lectures (for Asano credit) here on the Humanities & Health web calendar.

More about the Symposium

The College of Architecture and the Built Environment and Jefferson Center for Autism and Neurodiversity are teaming up to present a four-day, cross-disciplinary symposium to explore how to design inclusive environments, especially for neurodiverse individuals and those with autism. The symposium will bring together designers, medical field experts, people with Autism Spectrum Disorder, and caregivers. A round table discussion with speakers from the four days of panels will conclude the event on Monday, September 14. This event is free and open to the public.

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this specific lecture and discussion. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event. When you email, please format the subject line as: "Asano credit for [Event Title] and [Date]".

Schwartz Rounds: Uncertainty & Silver Linings

Wednesday, September 9, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (register in Canvas, see instructions below)

The Schwartz Rounds program offers healthcare providers a regularly scheduled time during their fast-paced work lives to openly and honestly discuss the social and emotional issues they face in caring for patients and families. In contrast to traditional medical rounds, the focus is on the human dimension of medicine. Caregivers have an opportunity to share their experiences, thoughts and feelings on thought-provoking topics drawn from actual patient cases. The premise is that caregivers are better able to make personal connections with patients and colleagues when they have greater insight into their own responses and feelings.

Panelists from diverse disciplines participate in the sessions, including physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, allied health professionals and chaplains. After listening to a panel’s brief presentation on an identified case or topic, caregivers in the audience are invited to share their own perspectives on the case and broader related issues.

Presented by the Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine; Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD.

To access the registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Schwartz Rounds page in the Event Links module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event. When you email, please format the subject line as: "Asano credit for [Event Title] and [Date]".

August

Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lecture: Stephen Trzeciak 

Wednesday, August 26, 4-5:30 p.m., Zoom (access event in Canvas, see instructions below)

The 2020 Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lecture presents Stephen Trzeciak, MD, MPH, physician scientist, Professor and Chair of Medicine at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, and the Chief of Medicine at Cooper University Health Care. Trzeciak is the co-author of Compassionomics: The Revolutionary Scientific Evidence That Caring Makes a Difference. Merging scientific data with stories from the frontlines, Compassionomics argues that the healthcare system is in a “compassion crisis” and human connection is the antidote. Trzeciak will explore the vital role compassion plays in saving lives, reducing healthcare cost, and lessening burnout among care providers. Learn more about the book here.

Sidney Kimmel Medical College is grateful to Mr. Ed Berkowitz and his family for the generous donation that has established the Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lectureship. The Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lectureship will help engage Jefferson’s students and physicians on various areas in medical humanism, including topics that will enhance their compassion toward patients, improve their communication skills with patients, and allow for a better understanding about how to practice medicine with a patient-centered vision of delivering improved humanistic medical care.

To access the registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Schwartz Rounds page in the Ongoing Programs module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event. When you email, please format the subject line as: "Asano credit for [Event Title] and [Date]".

Schwartz Rounds: Racial Disparity and the Coronavirus Pandemic

Wednesday, August 26, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (register in Canvas, see instructions below)

The Schwartz Rounds program offers healthcare providers a regularly scheduled time during their fast-paced work lives to openly and honestly discuss the social and emotional issues they face in caring for patients and families. In contrast to traditional medical rounds, the focus is on the human dimension of medicine. Caregivers have an opportunity to share their experiences, thoughts and feelings on thought-provoking topics drawn from actual patient cases. The premise is that caregivers are better able to make personal connections with patients and colleagues when they have greater insight into their own responses and feelings.

Panelists from diverse disciplines participate in the sessions, including physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, allied health professionals and chaplains. After listening to a panel’s brief presentation on an identified case or topic, caregivers in the audience are invited to share their own perspectives on the case and broader related issues.

Presented by the Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine; Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD.

To access the registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Schwartz Rounds page in the Event Links module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event. When you email, please format the subject line as: "Asano credit for [Event Title] and [Date]".

Health Humanities Reading Group

Monday, August 24, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (registration and readings in Canvas, see instructions below)

Reading/Listening:

Time: 35 min of reading and listening

Leading up to StoryCorps founder Dave Isay’s visit on 9/16, the Health Humanities Reading Group will be considering a selection of personal stories related to health and social care. This week’s readings focus on stories of healthcare providers and other essential workers coping with life during the pandemic. 

Special guest discussant: Danielle Snyderman, MD, Assistant Professor of Family and Community Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session. 

To access the readings and registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Megan Voeller, and visit the Health Humanities Reading Group page in the Ongoing Programs module. 

Virtual Cooking with Vetri: A Guide to Stir Fry

Tuesday, August 18, 5 p.m.

For Zoom link/instructions, email Angelina Seeney indicating which workshop you would like to attend.

The Jefferson Recreation & Fitness Center is teaming up with Vetri Virtual Teaching Kitchen Collaboration to provide three FREE online cooking workshops this summer.

These programs will teach employees and students the basics of cooking in a fresh and healthy manner. You can choose to cook along with the chefs, or just watch and learn. You will be supplied with an ingredient list and a list of kitchen supplies you will need on hand.  

If you are interested in joining us, please email Angelina Seeney, Assistant Director of Wellness Programs indicating which workshop or workshops you would like to attend. You will receive the Zoom meeting ID/password, a list of ingredients you will need, and a list of kitchen supplies to have on hand. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event. When you email, please format the subject line as: "Asano credit for [Event Title] and [Date]".

Health Humanities Reading Group

Monday, August 17, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (readings and registration in Canvas, see instructions below)

Reading: Chapter 3: "Matched-Pair" in El-Sayed, Abdul. (2020). Healing Politics: A Doctor’s Journey into the Heart of Our Political Epidemic. Abrams Press.

Time: 15 min read

Leading up to StoryCorps founder Dave Isay’s visit on 9/16, the Health Humanities Reading Group will be considering a selection of personal stories related to health and social care. Chapter 3 of Dr. Abdul El-Sayed’s memoir, Healing Politics, describes how his childhood experience with racism and Islamophobia influenced his decision to become an epidemiologist, physician, and activist, and how practicing Islam informs his work.

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session.

To access the readings and registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Megan Voeller, and visit the Health Humanities Reading Group page in the Ongoing Programs module. 

Schwartz Rounds: Changes to Visitation Policies and Loneliness

Wednesday, August 12, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (register in Canvas, see instructions below)

The Schwartz Rounds program offers healthcare providers a regularly scheduled time during their fast-paced work lives to openly and honestly discuss the social and emotional issues they face in caring for patients and families. In contrast to traditional medical rounds, the focus is on the human dimension of medicine. Caregivers have an opportunity to share their experiences, thoughts and feelings on thought-provoking topics drawn from actual patient cases. The premise is that caregivers are better able to make personal connections with patients and colleagues when they have greater insight into their own responses and feelings.

Panelists from diverse disciplines participate in the sessions, including physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, allied health professionals and chaplains. After listening to a panel’s brief presentation on an identified case or topic, caregivers in the audience are invited to share their own perspectives on the case and broader related issues.

Presented by the Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine; Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD.

To access the registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Schwartz Rounds page in the Event Links module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event. When you email, please format the subject line as: "Asano credit for [Event Title] and [Date]".

Exquisite Corpse Drawing Series

Tuesday, August 11, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Zoom (register here

“Exquisite corpse” is a drawing game invented by Surrealist artists in the early 1900s. One person draws a head, then conceals her work before passing the sheet of paper on to the next person who draws the figure’s torso. The second person then conceals everything and passes the sheet of paper on to a third person who draws the figure’s legs.  The goal is to use collaboration as a creative tool to generate an image that one could never think up on their own. The final outcomes are meant to be absurd and surprising, and absolutely no artistic experience is needed.

In this fun, low-key session, we'll create several exquisite corpses virtually. All you'll need is white paper (any scrap of computer paper or the back of an envelope will do), a dark-colored pen, and a smartphone.

Upcoming Sessions

  • Tuesday, September 22, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, October 13, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, November 10, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, December 8, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Julia Clift is a Philadelphia-based artist, educator, and writer. Her paintings and drawings have been exhibited in numerous locations, including Arnot Art Museum, Gross McCleaf Gallery, and Fleisher Art Memorial, and are held in the permanent collection of Wythe Hotel (Brooklyn, NY). In 2016, she received a Barbara Deming Memorial Fund Grant for her Woman Drawings series. She has taught painting and drawing at Tyler School of Art and Architecture, Maryland Institute College of Art, and Thomas Jefferson University (Visualizing Anatomy humanities selective).

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Monday, August 10, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (readings and registration in Canvas, see instructions below)

Reading: Chapter 5: "Dominic: Body of Evidence" in Harper, Michele. (2020). The Beauty in Breaking: A Memoir. Penguin.

Time: 16 min read

Leading up to StoryCorps founder Dave Isay’s visit on 9/16, the Health Humanities Reading Group will be considering a selection of personal stories related to health and social care. Chapter 5 of Dr. Michele Harper’s memoir, The Beauty in Breaking, details her experience as an emergency medicine physician in Philadelphia who refuses to engage in an unlawful medical examination of a Black man brought to the ER by police on suspicion of drug possession. Read more about Michele Harper’s memoir in The New York Times here

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers weekly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session.

To access the readings and registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Megan Voeller, and visit the Health Humanities Reading Group page in the Ongoing Programs module. 

Medicine+Music and Mindfulness

Tuesday, August 4, 6-7 p.m., Zoom (access the link in Canvas, instructions below)

The Medicine+Music program is offering their first session this semester, focusing on mindfulness tools geared towards balancing academic studies to stay healthy, thoughtful, and calm. The workshop will be led by Dr. Beverly Shin and Dr. Mary "Bit" Smith, both are graduates of Sidney Kimmel Medical College and now are psychiatry residents (Dr. Shin at Weill-Cornell and Dr. Smith at the University of Pennsylvania). Dr. Shin is a concert violinist and Dr. Smith has a Masters degree in positive psychology and is a trained meditation and mindfulness counselor. During this year, the Medicine+Music program will offer several special programs on the intersection of music and balanced progression toward a health professions degree and beyond.

Questions? Contact Dr. Susan Rosenthal, Associate Dean and Special Advisor to the Provost and Co-Director of Medicine Plus Music.

To access the event link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Medicine+Plus page in the Event Links module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event.

July

Schwartz Rounds: When the Covid Crisis Hit Healthcare

Wednesday, July 29, 12-1 p.m., Zoom (register in Canvas, see instructions below)

The Schwartz Rounds program offers healthcare providers a regularly scheduled time during their fast-paced work lives to openly and honestly discuss the social and emotional issues they face in caring for patients and families. In contrast to traditional medical rounds, the focus is on the human dimension of medicine. Caregivers have an opportunity to share their experiences, thoughts and feelings on thought-provoking topics drawn from actual patient cases. The premise is that caregivers are better able to make personal connections with patients and colleagues when they have greater insight into their own responses and feelings.

Panelists from diverse disciplines participate in the sessions, including physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, allied health professionals and chaplains. After listening to a panel’s brief presentation on an identified case or topic, caregivers in the audience are invited to share their own perspectives on the case and broader related issues.

Presented by the Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine; Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD.

To access the registration link, participants may self-enroll in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas, or email Matilda Ostow, and visit the Schwartz Rounds page in the Event Links module. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance after the event.

Learning From Our History: Living Beyond the Walls of the Institution
Wednesday, July 22, 4:30-6 p.m.
Register for the virtual panel discussion here.

A facilitated virtual discussion about the obstacles to living beyond the walls of institutionalized settings, current issues in community-based services, and what the future might hold. This event is part of Disability Pride Philadelphia's month of events, workshops, and screenings in honor of Pride Month. Check out the rest of their July events here.

Facilitator: Guy Caruso, Western Coordinator, Institute on Disabilities at Temple University
Invited participants include:

  • Brenda Dare, self-advocate, Independent Living Project Manager for Transitional Paths to Independent Living
  • Jamie Ray-Leonetti, Associate Director of Policy, Institute on Disabilities at Temple University
  • Debbie Robinson, Executive Director, Speaking for Ourselves
  • Nancy Thaler, former Deputy Secretary for the Pennsylvania Office of Developmental Programs

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please email Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance.

Virtual Cooking with Vetri: Building a Soup or Stew

Tuesday, July 14, 5 p.m.

For Zoom link/instructions, email Angelina Seeney indicating which workshop(s) you would like to attend.

The Jefferson Recreation & Fitness Center is teaming up with Vetri Virtual Teaching Kitchen Collaboration to provide three FREE online cooking workshops this summer.

These programs will teach employees and students the basics of cooking in a fresh and healthy manner. You can choose to cook along with the chefs, or just watch and learn. You will be supplied with an ingredient list and a list of kitchen supplies you will need on hand.  

Upcoming workshops

Tuesday, August 18, 5 p.m.: A Guide to Stir Fry

If you are interested in joining us, please email Angelina Seeney, Assistant Director of Wellness Programs indicating which workshop or workshops you would like to attend. You will receive the Zoom meeting ID/password, a list of ingredients you will need, and a list of kitchen supplies to have on hand. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance.

The Human Side of Healthcare: Medicine as Soul Work

Wednesday, July 1, 5-6 p.m.

Zoom instructions below

In patient care, it is so easy to focus on the breadth of medical knowledge and the technology available today that we can easily ignore the human side of what we do as physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals when we interact with our patients. To examine this aspect of clinical care, The Human Side of Healthcare will explore the humanity behind the practice of medicine from the perspective of patients and healthcare professionals.

Each hour-long session will include a brief introduction to the topic followed by group discussion. There is no required reading and no commitment to attend all five sessions. This course is open to medical and nursing students and students in other allied health departments at Thomas Jefferson University.

Session 5: Medicine as Soul Work will ask:

  • How can medicine be soulful? How can what we do as healthcare professionals help us find meaning in our lives?

Instructor: Donald M. Friedman, M.D. is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at SKMC.  He is a retired rheumatologist who was Chief of the Section of Rheumatology at Crozer-Chester Medical Center for 28 years. At SKMC, he has taught Introduction to Clinical Medicine and sessions on Professionalism and is currently a facilitator for CBL 1 and CBL 2. He has also facilitated the Healer’s Art at Jefferson for 10 years and is presently a Co-Director of the course. He has offered workshops at Jefferson on the art of Kintsugi, Japanese bowl repair, as a metaphor for self-compassion and self-acceptance.  Don has done professional training with Rachel Remen at RISHI (the Remen Institute for the Study of Health and Illness) and Christina Puchalski at GWish (George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health). He has also participated in workshops run by Animas Valley Institute, Omega Institute, Garrison Institute, Copper Beech Institute, and Kripalu Center.

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the "Jefferson Humanities & Health" organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

  • Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.
  • Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.
  • In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”
  • On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

June

Friday, June 26, 1 p.m., online via Zoom (Every Friday)

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center:

Learn practical coping skills to help you maintain mental health during this pandemic. Learn to distract, to be present with emotions, to accept, to make effective changes, to make healthy choices, and to live your values during this time of unprecedented stressors.

Facilitated by trainees (Masters-level clinicians working toward their doctoral degrees in Clinical Psychology), from the Jefferson Center City Clinic for Behavorial Medicine run by Dr. Virginia O'Hayer. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

The Human Side of Healthcare: Characteristics of Effective Practitioners

Wednesday, June 24, 5-6 p.m.

Zoom instructions below

In patient care, it is so easy to focus on the breadth of medical knowledge and the technology available today that we can easily ignore the human side of what we do as physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals when we interact with our patients. To examine this aspect of clinical care, The Human Side of Healthcare will explore the humanity behind the practice of medicine from the perspective of patients and healthcare professionals.

Each hour-long session will include a brief introduction to the topic followed by group discussion. There is no required reading and no commitment to attend all five sessions. This course is open to medical and nursing students and students in other allied health departments at Thomas Jefferson University.

Session 4: Characteristics of Effective Practitioners will ask:

  • What approaches to patient interactions can be healing? How do we as practitioners establish manful relationships with patients, no matter what our field of healthcare is?

Upcoming sessions:

Wednesday, July 1: Medicine as Soul Work

Instructor: Donald M. Friedman, M.D. is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at SKMC.  He is a retired rheumatologist who was Chief of the Section of Rheumatology at Crozer-Chester Medical Center for 28 years. At SKMC, he has taught Introduction to Clinical Medicine and sessions on Professionalism and is currently a facilitator for CBL 1 and CBL 2. He has also facilitated the Healer’s Art at Jefferson for 10 years and is presently a Co-Director of the course. He has offered workshops at Jefferson on the art of Kintsugi, Japanese bowl repair, as a metaphor for self-compassion and self-acceptance.  Don has done professional training with Rachel Remen at RISHI (the Remen Institute for the Study of Health and Illness) and Christina Puchalski at GWish (George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health). He has also participated in workshops run by Animas Valley Institute, Omega Institute, Garrison Institute, Copper Beech Institute, and Kripalu Center.

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the "Jefferson Humanities & Health" organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

  • Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.
  • Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.
  • In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”
  • On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

"Exquisite Corpse"

Tuesday, June 23, 5-6 p.m.

Zoom instructions below

“Exquisite corpse” is a drawing game invented by Surrealist artists in the early 1900s. One person draws a head, then conceals her work before passing the sheet of paper on to the next person who draws the figure’s torso. The second person then conceals everything and passes the sheet of paper on to a third person who draws the figure’s legs.  The goal is to use collaboration as a creative tool to generate an image that one could never think up on their own. The final outcomes are meant to be absurd and surprising, and absolutely no artistic experience is needed. 

In this fun, low-key session, we'll create several exquisite corpses virtually. All you'll need is white paper (any scrap of computer paper or the back of an envelope will do), a dark-colored pen, and a smartphone. 

Facilitator: Julia Clift is a Philadelphia-based artist, educator, and writer. Her paintings and drawings have been exhibited in numerous locations, including Arnot Art Museum, Gross McCleaf Gallery, and Fleisher Art Memorial, and are held in the permanent collection of Wythe Hotel (Brooklyn, NY). In 2016, she received a Barbara Deming Memorial Fund Grant for her Woman Drawings series. She has taught painting and drawing at Tyler School of Art and Architecture, Maryland Institute College of Art, and Thomas Jefferson University (Visualizing Anatomy humanities selective). 

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the "Jefferson Humanities & Health" organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

  • Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.
  • Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.
  • In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”
  • On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Sunday, June 21, 1:30-4 p.m., Love Park (16th Street and JFK Boulevard)

Learn more on Facebook

Join members of the local Black and LGBTQ+ communities, those who intersect both (and/or more) identities, and allies to march in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement in Philadelphia. Stand with us as we center and celebrate the intersection of the Black and LGBTQ+ communities. Recommit to the fundamental principles that guided the first “Pride” which took place 50 years ago with the Stonewall Riots. Listen to speakers who will share out personal perspectives and emphasize the importance of equality and visibility for all, but especially our Black and Brown siblings.

Black people across Philadelphia and throughout America -- many of whom are LGBTQ+ -- are systematically oppressed. Even more so, our Black Queer and Trans siblings are often erased from the narrative. Here in Philadelphia’s own LGBTQ+ community, we can not deny that anti-Blackness and racism persists. In the spirit of leaders like Marsha P. Johnson, the movement for long-overdue social change in America is being led by communities of color.

As members of LGBTQ+ communities from many races, faiths, abilities, and generations, we know that the only way to eradicate racism and it's resulting symptoms of discrimination, harassment, and violence is to speak out and demand systemic change.  Recommit to pride. March for Black Lives!

NOTE: This is a peaceful event, is unpermitted and will *not* be coordinated with law enforcement. Social distancing, wearing masks and taking other COVID-19 health and safety precautions is essential at this event.

Saturday, June 20, 12-5 p.m., online via Zoom or Facebook Live
Zoom Meeting ID: 988 9016 9432
Password: 538593
Facebook Live

Participate in the Johnson House's free 14th annual Juneteenth celebration, virtually! Festivities include: exploring the history and importance of Juneteenth, dramatic presentation, a virtual tour of the Johnson House, panel discussions, and more. Music provided by Philly's own DJ Groove.
Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated day to commemorate the end of slavery in the United States, and 2020 represents the 155th Anniversary of this historic event. 
The Johnson House Historic Site, Inc. is Philadelphia’s only accessible and intact stop on the Underground Railroad. During the 19th century, and for several generations beyond, The Johnson House was owned by a family of Quaker abolitionists who worked with other European Americans, and African Americans — free and enslaved, to secure safe passage to freedom along the extensive network of clandestine routes and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad.

Saturday, June 20, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., online via Zoom or Facebook Live

Register HERE (free)

Join the African American Museum in Philadelphia (AAMP) in celebration and reflection at their Juneteenth 2020 Virtual Festival! 2020 marks Pennsylvania’s first "official" statewide observance of Juneteenth, the African American holiday which originated in 1865 when the news of emancipation finally reached Galveston, Texas. This Juneteenth we will Celebrate the Diaspora by showcasing performances, fun activities, and public dialogues for all ages that highlight current and historic Diasporic connections across the globe. Artists, scholars and activists will discuss the 15th and 19th Amendments and the evolution of the Black Vote, Immigrant Heritage Month, and the immense contributions members of the African Diaspora make to the Philadelphia and worldwide cultural landscape.

Juneteenth 2020 Virtual Festival: Celebrate the Diaspora is presented by the African American Museum in Philadelphia in close partnership with WURD, African Cultural Alliance of North America (ACANA), Coalition of African and Caribbean Communities- Philadelphia (AFRICOM), Office of Immigrant Affairs- City of Philadelphia, and Pennsylvania Juneteenth Coalition (PAJC).

Friday, June 19, 1 p.m., online via Zoom (Every Friday)

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center:

Learn practical coping skills to help you maintain mental health during this pandemic. Learn to distract, to be present with emotions, to accept, to make effective changes, to make healthy choices, and to live your values during this time of unprecedented stressors.

Facilitated by trainees (Masters-level clinicians working toward their doctoral degrees in Clinical Psychology), from the Jefferson Center City Clinic for Behavorial Medicine run by Dr. Virginia O'Hayer. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

The Human Side of Healthcare: Listening as an Integral Part of Medicine

Wednesday, June 17, 5-6 p.m.

Zoom instructions below

In patient care, it is so easy to focus on the breadth of medical knowledge and the technology available today that we can easily ignore the human side of what we do as physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals when we interact with our patients. To examine this aspect of clinical care, The Human Side of Healthcare will explore the humanity behind the practice of medicine from the perspective of patients and healthcare professionals.

Each hour-long session will include a brief introduction to the topic followed by group discussion. There is no required reading and no commitment to attend all five sessions. This course is open to medical and nursing students and students in other allied health departments at Thomas Jefferson University.

Session 3: Listening as an Integral Part of Medicine will ask:

  • What constitutes good listening? How you you accomplish it? What are its benefits to both patient and practitioner?

Upcoming sessions:

Wednesday, June 24: Characteristics of Effective Practitioners

Wednesday, July 1: Medicine as Soul Work

Instructor: Donald M. Friedman, M.D. is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at SKMC.  He is a retired rheumatologist who was Chief of the Section of Rheumatology at Crozer-Chester Medical Center for 28 years. At SKMC, he has taught Introduction to Clinical Medicine and sessions on Professionalism and is currently a facilitator for CBL 1 and CBL 2. He has also facilitated the Healer’s Art at Jefferson for 10 years and is presently a Co-Director of the course. He has offered workshops at Jefferson on the art of Kintsugi, Japanese bowl repair, as a metaphor for self-compassion and self-acceptance.  Don has done professional training with Rachel Remen at RISHI (the Remen Institute for the Study of Health and Illness) and Christina Puchalski at GWish (George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health). He has also participated in workshops run by Animas Valley Institute, Omega Institute, Garrison Institute, Copper Beech Institute, and Kripalu Center.

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the "Jefferson Humanities & Health" organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

  • Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.
  • Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.
  • In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”
  • On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Virtual Cooking with Vetri: Knife Skill Salad & Stocking Your Pantry

Tuesday, June 16, 5 p.m.

For Zoom link/instructions, email Angelina Seeney indicating which workshop(s) you would like to attend.

The Jefferson Recreation & Fitness Center is teaming up with Vetri Virtual Teaching Kitchen Collaboration to provide three FREE online cooking workshops this summer.

These programs will teach employees and students the basics of cooking in a fresh and healthy manner. You can choose to cook along with the chefs, or just watch and learn. You will be supplied with an ingredient list and a list of kitchen supplies you will need on hand.  

Upcoming workshops

Tuesday, July 14, 5 p.m.: Building a Soup or Stew

Tuesday, August 18, 5 p.m.: A Guide to Stir Fry

If you are interested in joining us, please email Angelina Seeney, Assistant Director of Wellness Programs indicating which workshop or workshops you would like to attend. You will receive the Zoom meeting ID/password, a list of ingredients you will need, and a list of kitchen supplies to have on hand. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow to confirm your attendance.

Friday, June 12, 3 p.m.

Online via Zoom: Register HERE

Join Lisette Martinez, Jefferson’s Chief Diversity Officer, for a B.R.A.V.E Conversation to process the recent killings of Black people by the police and discuss racism, equity, and inclusion with the context of Jefferson.

Martinez writes:

"It is okay to talk about these events together and share our feelings of anger and sadness that can sometimes be overwhelming.  My job, in this moment and at this time - is to listen and provide a safe space for you to share your thoughts and feelings in a small group setting.  And from a productive dialogue, together, we can build a thoughtful path forward with the tools to cultivate a culture of inclusion that resonates with ALL of our diverse communities. The conversation starts now. Email us at enterprisediversity@jefferson.edu. We want to hear from you."

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Friday, June 12, 1 p.m., online via Zoom (Every Friday)

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center:

Learn practical coping skills to help you maintain mental health during this pandemic. Learn to distract, to be present with emotions, to accept, to make effective changes, to make healthy choices, and to live your values during this time of unprecedented stressors.

Facilitated by trainees (Masters-level clinicians working toward their doctoral degrees in Clinical Psychology), from the Jefferson Center City Clinic for Behavorial Medicine run by Dr. Virginia O'Hayer. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Wednesday, June 10, 6 p.m.
Online: Register HERE

The Philadelphia Citizen is hosting a town hall on healthcare disparity, how Covid-19 has made more stark the differences in health and healthcare among black and white Philadelphians, and what can be done to shift these systems of inequity. Dr. Ala Sanford, a pediatric surgeon at Abington-Jefferson Health, and founder of the Black Doctors Covid-19 Consortium that has tested thousands of Black people in Philadelphia for Covid-19 for free, will be in conversation with Dr. Stephen Klasko, CEO of Jefferson Health who has long called attention to and worked to combat racial disparities in healthcare. 

The Human Side of Healthcare: Spirituality and Healthcare

Wednesday, June 10, 5-6 p.m.

Zoom instructions below

In patient care, it is so easy to focus on the breadth of medical knowledge and the technology available today that we can easily ignore the human side of what we do as physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals when we interact with our patients. To examine this aspect of clinical care, The Human Side of Healthcare will explore the humanity behind the practice of medicine from the perspective of patients and healthcare professionals.

Each hour-long session will include a brief introduction to the topic followed by group discussion. There is no required reading and no commitment to attend all five sessions. This course is open to medical and nursing students and students in other allied health departments at Thomas Jefferson University.

Session 2: Spirituality and Healthcare will ask:

  • Why is spirituality an important part of patient care? How do you take a spiritual history?

Upcoming sessions:

Wednesday, June 17: Listening as an Integral Part of Medicine

Wednesday, June 24: Characteristics of Effective Practitioners

Wednesday, July 1: Medicine as Soul Work

Instructor: Donald M. Friedman, M.D. is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at SKMC.  He is a retired rheumatologist who was Chief of the Section of Rheumatology at Crozer-Chester Medical Center for 28 years. At SKMC, he has taught Introduction to Clinical Medicine and sessions on Professionalism and is currently a facilitator for CBL 1 and CBL 2. He has also facilitated the Healer’s Art at Jefferson for 10 years and is presently a Co-Director of the course. He has offered workshops at Jefferson on the art of Kintsugi, Japanese bowl repair, as a metaphor for self-compassion and self-acceptance.  Don has done professional training with Rachel Remen at RISHI (the Remen Institute for the Study of Health and Illness) and Christina Puchalski at GWish (George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health). He has also participated in workshops run by Animas Valley Institute, Omega Institute, Garrison Institute, Copper Beech Institute, and Kripalu Center.

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the "Jefferson Humanities & Health" organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

  • Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.
  • Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.
  • In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”
  • On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Wednesday, June 10, 3 p.m.

Online via Zoom: Register HERE

Join Lisette Martinez, Jefferson’s Chief Diversity Officer, for a B.R.A.V.E Conversation to process the recent killings of Black people by the police and discuss racism, equity, and inclusion with the context of Jefferson.

Martinez writes:

"It is okay to talk about these events together and share our feelings of anger and sadness that can sometimes be overwhelming.  My job, in this moment and at this time - is to listen and provide a safe space for you to share your thoughts and feelings in a small group setting.  And from a productive dialogue, together, we can build a thoughtful path forward with the tools to cultivate a culture of inclusion that resonates with ALL of our diverse communities. The conversation starts now. Email us at enterprisediversity@jefferson.edu. We want to hear from you."

Upcoming B.R.A.V.E Conversations:

Friday, June 12, 3 p.m., register HERE

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Monday, June 8, 3 p.m.

Online via Zoom: Register HERE

Join Lisette Martinez, Jefferson’s Chief Diversity Officer, for a B.R.A.V.E Conversation to process the recent killings of Black people by the police and discuss racism, equity, and inclusion with the context of Jefferson.

Martinez writes:

"It is okay to talk about these events together and share our feelings of anger and sadness that can sometimes be overwhelming.  My job, in this moment and at this time - is to listen and provide a safe space for you to share your thoughts and feelings in a small group setting.  And from a productive dialogue, together, we can build a thoughtful path forward with the tools to cultivate a culture of inclusion that resonates with ALL of our diverse communities. The conversation starts now. Email us at enterprisediversity@jefferson.edu. We want to hear from you."

Upcoming B.R.A.V.E Conversations:

Wednesday, June 10, 3 p.m., register HERE

Friday, June 12, 3 p.m., register HERE

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Friday, June 5, 1 p.m., online via Zoom (Every Friday)

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center:

Learn practical coping skills to help you maintain mental health during this pandemic. Learn to distract, to be present with emotions, to accept, to make effective changes, to make healthy choices, and to live your values during this time of unprecedented stressors.

Facilitated by trainees (Masters-level clinicians working toward their doctoral degrees in Clinical Psychology), from the Jefferson Center City Clinic for Behavorial Medicine run by Dr. Virginia O'Hayer. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Friday, June 5, 1 p.m.

Lubert Plaza, in front of the Hamilton Building (10th and Locust Street)

Join medical professionals from across the Greater Philadelphia area in kneeling for 9 minutes of silent remembrance. Please stand in solidarity with the SKMC chapters of SNMA, WC4BL, residents, faculty, and other community members as we take the time to reflect on the life of George Floyd and others who lost their lives unjustly and prematurely. We must acknowledge the effects of systemic and institutional racism in America. We recognize that racism is a public health crisis that translates into very real medical repercussions. We are here to listen, learn, and uplift. This is our lane. The organizers suggest that you wear your white coats or scrubs.

CANCELLED

Virtual Narrative Medicine Workshops

In the spirit of coming together while we are apart, we invite Jefferson students and employees to participate in virtual narrative medicine workshops.

Wednesdays, 6-7PM

April 8-June 3

Zoom instructions below 

Narrative medicine is a field that uses philosophy, art history, literary theory, critical race theory and creative writing to enhance the capacity for self-reflection on narratives of illness, trauma, disability and social injustice. 

These narrative medicine workshops will consist of the following: 

·       Doing a close reading of a text, work of art or film

·       Writing to a prompt generated by the text or media analyzed

·       Sharing written responses to the prompt with the group

·       Reflecting on the writing shared

The main aims of these workshops will be to offer the opportunity for individuals to connect and reflect together on care and the human condition, and provide a space of respite where we can metabolize the current moment in healthcare. 

Workshop facilitator Carly Slater is a rising third-year medical student at Sidney Kimmel Medical College and a graduate of the Narrative Medicine Master’s Degree Program at Columbia University. She has taught narrative medicine workshops and presented at narrative medicine conferences in the U.S. and in Italy for the past seven years. Her educational background also includes a Master's in Italian Literary Studies from Middlebury College and a Bachelor's Degree in Hispanic Studies from Columbia University.

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

·       Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.

·       Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.

·       In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”

·       On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

Questions?

Contact Carly Slater, SKMC ’22, Carly.Slater@jefferson.edu, or Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Office of Student Life & Engagement, Megan.Voeller@jefferson.edu

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

The Human Side of Healthcare: Mindful Self-Compassion                                                 

Wednesday, June 3, 5-6 p.m.

Zoom instructions below

In patient care, it is so easy to focus on the breadth of medical knowledge and the technology available today that we can easily ignore the human side of what we do as physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals when we interact with our patients. To examine this aspect of clinical care, The Human Side of Healthcare will explore the humanity behind the practice of medicine from the perspective of patients and healthcare professionals.

Each hour-long session will include a brief introduction to the topic followed by group discussion. There is no required reading and no commitment to attend all five sessions. This course is open to medical and nursing students and students in other allied health departments at Thomas Jefferson University.

Session 1: Mindful Self-Compassion will ask:

  • What is mindful self-compassion? How do you practice it? What are its benefits?

Upcoming sessions:

Wednesday, June 10: Spirituality and Healthcare

Wednesday, June 17: Listening as an Integral Part of Medicine

Wednesday, June 24: Characteristics of Effective Practitioners

Wednesday, July 1: Medicine as Soul Work

Instructor: Donald M. Friedman, M.D. is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at SKMC.  He is a retired rheumatologist who was Chief of the Section of Rheumatology at Crozer-Chester Medical Center for 28 years. At SKMC, he has taught Introduction to Clinical Medicine and sessions on Professionalism and is currently a facilitator for CBL 1 and CBL 2. He has also facilitated the Healer’s Art at Jefferson for 10 years and is presently a Co-Director of the course. He has offered workshops at Jefferson on the art of Kintsugi, Japanese bowl repair, as a metaphor for self-compassion and self-acceptance.  Don has done professional training with Rachel Remen at RISHI (the Remen Institute for the Study of Health and Illness) and Christina Puchalski at GWish (George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health). He has also participated in workshops run by Animas Valley Institute, Omega Institute, Garrison Institute, Copper Beech Institute, and Kripalu Center.

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the "Jefferson Humanities & Health" organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

  • Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.
  • Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.
  • In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”
  • On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

May

Friday, May 29, 1 p.m., online via Zoom (Every Friday)

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center:

Learn practical coping skills to help you maintain mental health during this pandemic. Learn to distract, to be present with emotions, to accept, to make effective changes, to make healthy choices, and to live your values during this time of unprecedented stressors.

Facilitated by trainees (Masters-level clinicians working toward their doctoral degrees in Clinical Psychology), from the Jefferson Center City Clinic for Behavorial Medicine run by Dr. Virginia O'Hayer. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Virtual Narrative Medicine Workshops

In the spirit of coming together while we are apart, we invite Jefferson students and employees to participate in virtual narrative medicine workshops.

Wednesdays, 6-7PM

April 8-June 3

Zoom instructions below 

Narrative medicine is a field that uses philosophy, art history, literary theory, critical race theory and creative writing to enhance the capacity for self-reflection on narratives of illness, trauma, disability and social injustice. 

These narrative medicine workshops will consist of the following: 

·       Doing a close reading of a text, work of art or film

·       Writing to a prompt generated by the text or media analyzed

·       Sharing written responses to the prompt with the group

·       Reflecting on the writing shared

The main aims of these workshops will be to offer the opportunity for individuals to connect and reflect together on care and the human condition, and provide a space of respite where we can metabolize the current moment in healthcare. 

Workshop facilitator Carly Slater is a rising third-year medical student at Sidney Kimmel Medical College and a graduate of the Narrative Medicine Master’s Degree Program at Columbia University. She has taught narrative medicine workshops and presented at narrative medicine conferences in the U.S. and in Italy for the past seven years. Her educational background also includes a Master's in Italian Literary Studies from Middlebury College and a Bachelor's Degree in Hispanic Studies from Columbia University.

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

·       Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.

·       Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.

·       In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”

·       On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

Questions?

Contact Carly Slater, SKMC ’22, Carly.Slater@jefferson.edu, or Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Office of Student Life & Engagement, Megan.Voeller@jefferson.edu

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Exploring Loneliness in Medicine

Wednesday, May 27, 12 p.m.

Zoom instructions below

Jefferson's student mental health group CHATT is creating an opportunity to discuss the impact that loneliness has on our patients, healthcare works as a whole, and ourselves. Our event will include a brief introduction to the science of loneliness and how it differs from social isolation, followed by reflective writing and open discussion. Come to explore the role of loneliness in medicine and leave with tangible skills that can help combat its many effects.

Facilitated by Jared Raikin, MS3, Sidney Kimmel Medical College.

About CHATT: CHATT is a program designed by students for students at Thomas Jefferson University to promote mental health awareness and discussion about mental health. It is comprised of students who wish to be a listening ear for peers who need additional support and would like someone to talk to about current concerns. 

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the "Jefferson Humanities & Health" organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

  • Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.
  • Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.
  • In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”
  • On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Affirmations & Gratitude

Wednesday, May 27, 12-12:30 p.m.,
online via Zoom

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center, as part of the Wednesday Wellness Days series, providing short activities to help you relieve stress and increase your motivation.

Attend this workshop and create helpful affirmations to motivate you to reach your personal and academic goals. Also, create a gratitude jar to house daily gratitude reminders.

Facilitated by Dr. Blue, Staff Psychologist, Student Counseling Center

**Please note: This program is currently scheduled to take place online, due to university, city and state physical distancing guidelines.**

Calling all creative composers! The Summer Intensive Creative Workshop is designed for those of you with writing or other creative narrative projects in progress. Whether you're a poet, a fiction and essay writer, or a graphic and pictorial composer, you are encouraged to sign up! We all know the creative process can sometimes feel like a lonely and frustrating endeavor, so this workshop will be a place where you will share your work, give each other thoughtful feedback, find inspiration and connect with a supportive community.

Instructor: Katherine Hubbard, Teaching Lecturer in Writing, Jefferson East Falls

This workshop is open to new students, as well as to students who have previously completed Introduction to Creative Writing with instructor Kath Hubbard. The workshop is also open to Jefferson staff and faculty.

Class Format: This seminar meets every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday between May 26 and June 11 from 6-7:30 p.m. REGISTER HERE.

Friday, May 22, 1 p.m., online via Zoom (Every Friday)

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center:

Learn practical coping skills to help you maintain mental health during this pandemic. Learn to distract, to be present with emotions, to accept, to make effective changes, to make healthy choices, and to live your values during this time of unprecedented stressors.

Facilitated by trainees (Masters-level clinicians working toward their doctoral degrees in Clinical Psychology), from the Jefferson Center City Clinic for Behavorial Medicine run by Dr. Virginia O'Hayer. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event. If you would like to receive Asano Certificate credit for attending this event, please e-mail Humanities Program Coordinator Matilda Ostow (Matilda.Ostow@jefferson.edu) to confirm your attendance.

Virtual Narrative Medicine Workshops

In the spirit of coming together while we are apart, we invite Jefferson students and employees to participate in virtual narrative medicine workshops.

Wednesdays, 6-7PM

April 8-June 3

Zoom instructions below 

Narrative medicine is a field that uses philosophy, art history, literary theory, critical race theory and creative writing to enhance the capacity for self-reflection on narratives of illness, trauma, disability and social injustice. 

These narrative medicine workshops will consist of the following: 

·       Doing a close reading of a text, work of art or film

·       Writing to a prompt generated by the text or media analyzed

·       Sharing written responses to the prompt with the group

·       Reflecting on the writing shared

The main aims of these workshops will be to offer the opportunity for individuals to connect and reflect together on care and the human condition, and provide a space of respite where we can metabolize the current moment in healthcare. 

Workshop facilitator Carly Slater is a rising third-year medical student at Sidney Kimmel Medical College and a graduate of the Narrative Medicine Master’s Degree Program at Columbia University. She has taught narrative medicine workshops and presented at narrative medicine conferences in the U.S. and in Italy for the past seven years. Her educational background also includes a Master's in Italian Literary Studies from Middlebury College and a Bachelor's Degree in Hispanic Studies from Columbia University.

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

·       Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.

·       Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.

·       In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”

·       On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

Questions?

Contact Carly Slater, SKMC ’22, Carly.Slater@jefferson.edu, or Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Office of Student Life & Engagement, Megan.Voeller@jefferson.edu

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Wednesday, May 20, 4 p.m., online via Zoom 

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center:

As we approach major milestones and events that deserve celebrating multiple feelings might occur in acknowledging that celebrations might be different than you imagined. Attend this workshop and consider ways to manage the emotions associated with celebrating but also find ways to gain opportunities to celebrate in creative ways.

Facilitated by Dr Blue, Staff Psychologist, Student Counseling Center

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Colorful Moments

Wednesday, May 20, 12-12:30 p.m.,
online via Zoom

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center, as part of the Wednesday Wellness Days series, providing short activities to help you relieve stress and increase your motivation.

Attend this workshop and engage in a short and relaxing art activity.

Facilitated by Dr. Blue, Staff Psychologist, Student Counseling Center

Friday, May 15, 1 p.m., online via Zoom (Every Friday)

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center:

Learn practical coping skills to help you maintain mental health during this pandemic. Learn to distract, to be present with emotions, to accept, to make effective changes, to make healthy choices, and to live your values during this time of unprecedented stressors.

Facilitated by trainees (Masters-level clinicians working toward their doctoral degrees in Clinical Psychology), from the Jefferson Center City Clinic for Behavorial Medicine run by Dr. Virginia O'Hayer. 

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Virtual Narrative Medicine Workshops

In the spirit of coming together while we are apart, we invite Jefferson students and employees to participate in virtual narrative medicine workshops.

Wednesdays, 6-7PM
April 8-June 3
Zoom instructions below 

Narrative medicine is a field that uses philosophy, art history, literary theory, critical race theory and creative writing to enhance the capacity for self-reflection on narratives of illness, trauma, disability and social injustice. 

These narrative medicine workshops will consist of the following: 

·       Doing a close reading of a text, work of art or film

·       Writing to a prompt generated by the text or media analyzed

·       Sharing written responses to the prompt with the group

·       Reflecting on the writing shared

The main aims of these workshops will be to offer the opportunity for individuals to connect and reflect together on care and the human condition, and provide a space of respite where we can metabolize the current moment in healthcare. 

Workshop facilitator Carly Slater is a rising third-year medical student at Sidney Kimmel Medical College and a graduate of the Narrative Medicine Master’s Degree Program at Columbia University. She has taught narrative medicine workshops and presented at narrative medicine conferences in the U.S. and in Italy for the past seven years. Her educational background also includes a Master's in Italian Literary Studies from Middlebury College and a Bachelor's Degree in Hispanic Studies from Columbia University.

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

·       Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.

·       Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.

·       In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”

·       On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

Questions?

Contact Carly Slater, SKMC ’22, Carly.Slater@jefferson.edu, or Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Office of Student Life & Engagement, Megan.Voeller@jefferson.edu

*Students may earn credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate by attending this event.

Writing Prompts

Wednesday, May 13, 12-12:30 p.m.,
online via Zoom

Register HERE

Brought to you by the Student Counseling Center, as part of the Wednesday Wellness Days series, providing short activities to help you relieve stress and increase your motivation.

Attend this workshop and complete writing prompts to keep you motivated and enhance your mood.

Facilitated by Dr. Blue, Staff Psychologist, Student Counseling Center

Virtual Narrative Medicine Workshops

In the spirit of coming together while we are apart, we invite Jefferson students and employees to participate in virtual narrative medicine workshops.

Wednesdays, 6-7PM
April 8-June 3
Zoom instructions below 

Narrative medicine is a field that uses philosophy, art history, literary theory, critical race theory and creative writing to enhance the capacity for self-reflection on narratives of illness, trauma, disability and social injustice. 

These narrative medicine workshops will consist of the following: 

·       Doing a close reading of a text, work of art or film

·       Writing to a prompt generated by the text or media analyzed

·       Sharing written responses to the prompt with the group

·       Reflecting on the writing shared

The main aims of these workshops will be to offer the opportunity for individuals to connect and reflect together on care and the human condition, and provide a space of respite where we can metabolize the current moment in healthcare. 

Workshop facilitator Carly Slater is a rising third-year medical student at Sidney Kimmel Medical College and a graduate of the Narrative Medicine Master’s Degree Program at Columbia University. She has taught narrative medicine workshops and presented at narrative medicine conferences in the U.S. and in Italy for the past seven years. Her educational background also includes a Master's in Italian Literary Studies from Middlebury College and a Bachelor's Degree in Hispanic Studies from Columbia University.

Zoom link instructions: The Zoom link for each meeting is available in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Blackboard. 

How to access the link:

·       Log on to Jefferson.blackboard.com with your Jefferson credentials.

·       Click the “Community” tab toward the top of the Blackboard home page.

·       In the Organization search box, search for “Humanities.”

·       On the results page, click on the downward arrow next to “JHH” and then click “Enroll.”

Questions?

Contact Carly Slater, SKMC ’22, Carly.Slater@jefferson.edu, or Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Office of Student Life & Engagement, Megan.Voeller@jefferson.edu


Memory: 2019-2020

Each academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum explores a thought-provoking theme from a broad range of perspectives, inviting consideration and action around urgent issues impacting how we improve lives. Series programs promote understanding of the social contexts of health and wellness, the lived experiences of diverse individuals and communities, and self-care for health professionals.

During the 2019-2020 academic year, the Jefferson Humanities Forum investigated the theme Memory.

Throughout the year, forum events will explore aspects of Memory, including:

  • Living with dementia as a patient, care partner or family member
  • Memory and its presence or erasure in the built environment
  • Memoir and writing from memory
  • Genealogy, genetics and social justice

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series Interest Meeting

Weds., Sept. 4, 12 p.m.

Moment to Moment Film Screening

Fri., Sept. 6, 12 p.m.

Dean's Concert Series: Mozart to Mahler: The View From the French Horn

Tues., Sept. 10, 12 p.m.,

Tangles in Time performances

Sept. 13-14

Tangles in Time Panel Discussion

Tues., Sept. 16, 12 p.m.

Narcan Story Slam

Weds., Sept. 18, 6:30 p.m.

Jefferson Night at the Orchestra: Yannick and Hélène Grimaud

Sat., Sept. 21, 8 p.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Sept. 23, 12 p.m.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Connecting

Mon., Sept. 23, 5 p.m.

In Our Right Mind: Alzheimer's and Other Demntias' Impact in Communities of Color

Tues., Sept. 23, 12 p.m.

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series

Mon., Sept. 30, 6 p.m.

Jefferson Humanities Forum: Tia Powell

Weds., Oct. 2, 12 p.m.

EAST FALLS - Roxboro House Roundtable: Mass Incarceration 

Thurs., Oct. 3, 3-4 p.m.

L'Ultimo Respiro: Tuberculosis and Culture in Forlanini's Times

Thurs., Oct. 3, 7 p.m.

Jefferson and Philadelphia Contemporary present Back and Song: Opening Reception

Fri., Oct. 4, 12-3 p.m., JAH Atrium

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Oct. 7, 12 p.m.

DocNights with PFS and William Way: Stumped

Mon., Oct. 7, 7 p.m.

Drop In, Drum it Out! with percussionist Josh Robinson

Mon., Oct. 14, 5 p.m.

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series

Mon., Oct. 14, 6 p.m.

Free Student Tickets: RENT

Fri., Oct. 18, 8 p.m.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: From Self-Criticism to Self-Compassion

Mon., Oct. 21, 5 p.m

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Oct. 21, 12 p.m.

EAST FALLS - Roxboro House Roundtable: The Immigration Crisis

Thurs., Oct. 24, 12:30 p.m.

Jefferson Humanities Forum: Deirdre Cooper Owens in conversation with Elissa Blount Moorhead and Bradford Young

Fri., Oct 25, 5 p.m.

Back and Song Tour with artists Elissa Blount Moorhead and Bradford Young

Sat., Oct 26, 3 p.m.

Wellness Week Story Slam

Mon., Oct 28, 4 p.m.

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series

Mon., Oct. 28, 6 p.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Nov. 4, 12 p.m.

Drop In, Drum It Out! with Percussionist Josh Robinson

Weds., Nov. 6, 5 p.m

EAST FALLS - Specter Fellows Present: Prisons in Crisis

Thurs., Nov. 7, 6:30 p.m.

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series

Mon., Nov. 11, 6 p.m.

Inis Nua Reading Series: Aging in Our Time

Mon., Nov. 11, 7 p.m.

DocNights with PFS and William Way: TransMilitary

Tues., Nov. 12, 7 p.m.

"Places for Discovery" Art Show and Reception

Thurs., Nov. 14, 5 p.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Nov. 18, 12 p.m.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Creating Balance

Mon., Nov. 18, 5 p.m.

Liliana Velasquez: Dreams and Nightmares/Sueños y Pesadillas

Thurs., Nov. 21, 12 p.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Nov. 25, 12 p.m.

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series 

Mon., Dec. 2, 6 p.m.

Medicine + Music Workshop with Philadelphia Orchestra cellist Yumi Kendall

Thurs., Dec. 5, 5:45 p.m.

Lewis Katz School of Medicine Narrative Medicine Conference

Sat., Dec. 16

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Dec. 9, 12 p.m.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Mindfulness and Self-Awareness

Mon., Dec. 9, 5 p.m.

The People in the Middle: Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

Tues., Dec. 10, 3 p.m.

JeffVotes: Voting and Healthcare

Thurs., Dec. 12, 12 p.m.

TJU Choir 50th Anniversary Concert

Fri., Dec. 13, 8 p.m.

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series 

Mon., Dec. 16, 6 p.m.

Dean's Concert Series: The Poet & The Peasant

Tues., Dec. 17, 12 p.m.

Knitting and Crocheting Group

Tues., Jan. 7, 12 p.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Jan. 13, 12 p.m.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Managing Anxiety 

Mon., Jan. 13, 5 p.m.

Inis Nua Reading Series: Aging in Our Time 

Mon., Jan. 13, 7 p.m.

Dean's Concert Series: David's Harp

Tues., Jan. 14, 12 p.m.

Failing Forward: Processing our Failures on the Path Towards Growth

Tues., Jan. 14, 6 p.m.

Knitting and Crocheting Group

Thurs., Jan. 7, 12 p.m.

DocNights presents We Exist: Beyond the Binary

Tues., Jan. 21, 7 p.m.

JeffX Global Health Conference: Planetary Health

Fri., Jan. 24, 3 p.m.

SKMC Humanism in Medicine Conference: Inclusivity and Patient-Centered Care

Sat., Jan 24

Health Humanities Group 

Mon., Jan. 27, 12 p.m.

The Vicissitudes of Travel

Tues., Jan. 28, 6 p.m.

Knitting and Crocheting Group

Weds., Jan. 29, 12 p.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Feb. 3, 12 p.m.

The Vicissitudes of Travel

Mon., Feb. 3, 6 p.m.

JeffSOAR presents the Vagina Monologues

Feb. 8 & 9

Health Humanities Reading Group with Adam DePaul

Mon., Feb. 10, 12 p.m.

Why Work? Exploring Work, Culture, and AI

Mon., Feb. 10

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Coping With Stress

Mon., Feb. 10, 5 p.m.

Dean's Concert Series: Taking Flight

Tues., Feb 11, 12 p.m.

Food & Wellness Workshop with Vetri Mobile Teaching Kitchen

Tues., Feb. 11

Why Work? Exploring Work, Culture, and AI

Weds., Feb. 12, 12 p.m.

Knitting and Crocheting

Thurs., Feb. 13

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Feb. 17, 12 p.m.

Why Work? Exploring Work, Culture, and AI

Mon., Feb. 17, 12 p.m.

Why Work? Exploring Work, Culture, and AI

Weds., Feb. 19, 12 p.m.

The Renfew Center exhibits Artwork by Women in Recovery from Eating Disorders

Mon., Feb. 24, 11 a.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon., Feb. 24, 12 p.m.

Schwartz Rounds: Maintaining Compassionate Care for Patients Facing Addition

Tues., Feb. 25, 12 p.m.

Renaissance in the Belly of a Killer Whale

Fri., Feb. 28, 7:30 p.m.

Flower Show: Lecture & Visit: Gardening & Community Health

Sat., Feb. 29

Inis Nua Reading Series: Aging in Our Time

Tues., Mar. 3, 7 p.m.

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Cultivating Self-Acceptance

Mon., Mar. 9, 5 p.m.

[Canceled] Dean's Concert Series: East Wind Ensemble

Tues., Mar. 10, 12 p.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group [Online]

Mon., Mar. 16, 12 p.m.

DocNights presents: For They Know Not What They Do 

Tues., Mar. 17, 7 p.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group [Online]

Mon., Mar. 23, 12 p.m.

[Canceled] Jefferson Humanities Forum: Michael Chabon

Wed., Mar. 25, 12 p.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group [Online]

Mon., Mar. 30, 12 p.m.

Health Humanities Reading Group

Mon, Apr. 6, 12pm

Virtual Narrative Medicine Workshops

Weds, 6-7pm

April 8, 15, 22, and 29

From the Title IX Office: Self-Care and How to Support Survivors

Mon, Apr. 27, 1pm 

From the Title IX Office: Virtual Screening of "Nameless"

Tues, Apr. 28, 1pm

From the Title IX Office: Talk with Title IX

Tues, Apr. 28, 4pm

From the Title IX Office and JeffSOAR: Virtual Take Back the Night

Weds, Apr. 29, 7pm

The Empathy Project Virtual Play Reading

Thurs, Apr. 30, 6pm


Fusion: 2018-2019

Each academic year, the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate explores a thought-provoking theme from a broad range of perspectives, inviting consideration and action around urgent issues impacting how we improve lives. Series programs promote understanding of the social contexts of health and wellness, the lived experiences of diverse individuals and communities, and self-care for health professionals.

During the 2018-2019 academic year, the Asano Humanities & Health Series investigated the theme Fusion.

Throughout the year, series programs will explore dimensions of Fusion, focusing on:

  • Collaborations across disciplines resulting in new knowledge, methods and ways of knowing
  • Creative thinking at the intersection of broadly different fields and industries
  • Unexpected combinations of technique, style and perspective

Karim Rashid: The Future of Design
Mon., Aug. 27, 6 p.m., Hamilton Building, Connelly Auditorium

Do You Want A Cookie? by the Bearded Ladies Cabaret*
Fri., Sept. 7, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., 448 North 10th Street

Jefferson Night at the Orchestra: Opening Weekend
Sat., Sept. 15, 7 p.m., the Kimmel Center

Majora Carter - Community as Corporation: Talent Retention in Low-Status Communities
Mon., Sept. 17, 6 p.m., DEC Forum, East Falls Campus

Signs of Humanity Documentary Film Screening*
Wed., Sept. 19, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton Building

Jefferson Humanities Forum: Willie Baronet - Signs of Humanity Exhibition Reception and Panel Discussion*
Thurs., Sept. 20, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton Building

Signs of Humanity Exhibition
Mon., Sept. 17 - Sat. Sept. 22, Hamilton Building

Talking about Dementia Dinner*
Sun., Sept. 23, 5-7 p.m., Martin Hall Basement

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Coping with Stress*
Mon., Sept. 24, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton Building
Opera Philadelphia: Sky on Wings
Sat., Sept. 29, 1:30 p.m., Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center

Design Philadelphia Festival: Art Therapy workshop
Tues., Oct. 9, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Kanbar Performance Space, East Falls campus
Spectrum Dance Theater: A Rap on Race*
Sat., Oct. 13, 8 p.m., Zellerbach Theatre, Annenberg Center
Creative Approaches to Self Care: Balancing Work and Life*
Mon., Oct. 15, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225
JCN Poverty Simulation*
Thurs., Oct. 18, 12-3 p.m., JAH Atrium
Maiken Scott: Communicating Your Science to the Public 
Thurs., Oct. 18, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Hamilton 505
Jefferson Humanities Forum: Anne Basting - Aging, Dementia, and the Cultural Care*
Fri., Oct. 19, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton 505
Soul of Medicine Brunch
Sun., Oct. 21, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., College of Physicians
QUEST Documentary Screening*
Mon., Oct. 22, 5-8 p.m., BLSB 101
Philly's Asian Food Tour
Sun., Oct. 28, 1:30 p.m.
Resilience Story Slam*
Mon., Oct. 29, 5-6:30 p.m
Dean's Concert: Jack St. Clair Orchestra*
Tues., Oct. 30, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton Lobby 

Be the Change: The Road to Equality*
Weds., Nov. 7, 5-7:30 p.m., JAH Brent Auditorium

Slought Presents: Jonathan Metzl, The Politics of Health
Thurs., Nov. 8, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Slought

Theater of Witness: Walk in My Shoes screening*
Fri., Nov. 9, Eakins Lounge

Inis Nua Readings Series: Medicine in Modern Life*
Mon., Nov. 12, 7 p.m., Drake Theater

IHI Film Screening on Informed Consent*
Tues., Nov. 13, 6:30 p.m., JAH 207

Veterans Day Panel*
Tues., Nov. 13, 6 p.m., Connelly Auditorium

JCN Poverty Simulation*
Weds., Nov. 14, 1 p.m., Hamilton 1st Floor

JeffX Global Health Conference*
Fri., Nov. 16, 3 p.m., Foerderer Auditorium

Creative Approaches to Self Care: From Self-Critism to Self-Compassion*
Mon., Nov. 19, 5 p.m., Hamilton 224

JCN Poverty Simulation*
Tues., Nov. 20, 12 p.m., JAH Atrium

Dean's Concert: Philadelphia Brass*
Tues., Nov. 27, 12 p.m., Eakins Lounge
Schwartz Rounds*
Weds., Nov. 28, 12 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Jefferson Humanities Forum: Alan Lightman, The Physicist as Novelist*
Weds., Dec. 5, 12 p.m., Connelly Auditorium

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Transforming Mental and Emotional States*
Mon., Dec. 10, 5 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Patient Safety Film Screening*
Thurs., Dec. 16, 6 p.m., JAH

TJU Choir and Orchestra Holiday Concert*
Fri., Dec. 14, 8 p.m., St. Luke and the Epiphany
JCN Poverty Simulation*
Tues., Dec. 18, 12 p.m., JAH Atrium

Inis Nua Reading Series: Medicine in Modern Life*

Mon., Jan. 14, 7 p.m., Drake Theatres 

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series*

Mon., Jan. 14, 6-7 p.m., Hamilton 208

Dean's Concert: Tony Miceli & Diane Monroe*

Tues., January 15, 12 p.m., Eakins Lounge 

Schwartz Rounds*

Weds., Jan. 23, 12-1 p.m., College Herbut Auditorium

Health Humanities Reading Group: One Book, One Philadelphia*

Mon., Jan 28, 12 p.m., Scott 200A

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Managing Anxiety and Insecurity*

Mon., Jan 28, 5 p.m. JAH

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series*

Mon., Jan. 28, 6-7 p.m., Hamilton 208

Dean's Concert Series: Orchestra 2001

Tues., Jan. 29, 12 p.m., Hamilton Lobby

East Falls Community Observance: Liberty to Love

Tues., Jan. 29, 12:30 p.m., East Falls campus

Weds., Jan. 30, 5:15 p.m., East Falls campus

Humanism in Medicine Conference: Maintaining Empathy, Mental Health, and Resilience in Our Communities*

Sat., Feb. 2, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Hamilton Building

The Defamation Experience*

Mon., Feb. 4, 5-7:30 p.m., Hamilton Building

Diversity Council Journal Club*

Weds., Feb. 6, 12-1 p.m., JAH M21

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series*

Mon., Feb. 11, 6-7 p.m., Hamilton 208

Jefferson Humanities Forum: Kerry Brodie - Food Fight: Equality, Opportunity, and the Pursuit of Independence*

Tues., Feb. 12, 12 p.m., Connelly Auditorium

Jefferson Night at the Orchestra: A Space Odyssey

Sat., Feb 16, 8 p.m., Verizon Hall

Narrative Medicine Workshop Series*

Mon., Feb. 25, 6-7 p.m., Hamilton 208

Schwartz Rounds

Weds., Feb 27, 12 p.m., BLSB 101

Free Student Tickets - Broadway Philadelphia's Rent*
Tues., Mar. 5, 7:30 p.m., Merriam Theater at the Kimmel Center
Dietrich V. Asten Lecture Series: Zoe Strauss*
Tues., Mar. 5, 6 p.m., East Falls Campus

Dean's Concert Series: Enlightened Ladies*
Tues., Mar. 12, 12 p.m., Hamilton Lobby

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Cultivating Self-Acceptance*
Mon., Mar. 18, 5 p.m., JAH M23

Narrative Medicine Workshop series*
Mon., Mar. 18, 6 p.m., Hamilton 210

Free student tickets: The Curious Incident of a Dog in the Night-Time*
Sun., Mar. 24, 7 p.m., Walnut Street Theatre

Jefferson Humanities Forum presents Vijay Gupta, The Medicine of Music*
Wed., March 27, 12 p.m., Connelly Auditorium

Every Patient a Poem: Poetry and the Clinician
Mon., Apr. 8, 4 p.m., 901 Walnut Street Lobby

Leonardo at 500: A Lesson in Creativity
Mon., Apr. 15, 12 p.m., Brent Auditorium, JAH

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Connection
Mon., Apr. 15, 5 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Jefferson Humanities Forum - Jonathan Metzl: Dying of Whiteness
Thurs., Apr. 18, 12-1 p.m., Eakins Lounge

A Celebration of the Humanities
Thurs., April 18, 5 p.m., BLSB 101

Nurses on the Inside: A Memoir of the AIDS Epidemic in New York City
Fri., Apr. 19, 12:30 p.m., East Falls campus
Failing Forward: Learning from Mistakes on the Road to Success 
Mon., Apr. 22, 6 p.m., Conrady Auditorium


Safety: 2017-2018

Each academic year, the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate explores a thought-provoking theme from a broad range of perspectives, inviting consideration and action around urgent issues impacting how we improve lives. Series programs promote understanding of the social contexts of health and wellness, the lived experiences of diverse individuals and communities, and self-care for health professionals.

During the 2017-2018 academic year, the Asano Humanities & Health Series investigated the theme Safety.

Throughout the year, series programs will explore dimensions of Safety, including:

  • Safety as a social privilege related to age, ability, gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation 
  • Inequities as causes of health vulnerabilities 
  • Burnout prevention for health professionals 
  • Creating safe spaces and supporting diversity of opinion 
  • Risk-taking in art, design and entrepreneurship 

Poetry Workshop with Philadelphia Poet Laureate Yolanda Wisher
Sat., Sept. 2, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Hamilton 210/211

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Grounding
Mon., Sept. 11, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 210/211

The Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lecture: Damon Tweedy, MD
Tues., Sept. 12, 12 p.m., Herbut Auditorium, College Building
Tues., Sept. 12, 4 p.m., Connelly Auditorium, Dorrance H. Hamilton Building

Caring for Communities: Practicing at the Intersection of Health + Art
Tues., Sept. 12, 6:30-8 p.m., Moore College of Art and Design, 1916 Race St. 

A Friend of a Friend Sent Me
Thurs., Sept. 14, 7-8:30 p.m., St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 10th Street between Chestnut and Market

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Sept. 18, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Opera Philadelphia: We Shall Not Be Moved
Mon., Sept. 18 & Thurs., Sept. 21, 8-10:30 p.m., Wilma Theater, 265 South Broad Street

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Sept. 25, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Oct. 2, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Mental Health/Transforming Emotional States
Mon., Oct. 2, 5-7 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall M23

Jefferson Night at The Philadelphia Orchestra: Season Kick-Off, Yannick & Emmanuel Ax
Sat., Oct. 7, private reception at 6:30 p.m., concert at 8 p.m., Verizon Hall, Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Oct. 9, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Dean's Concert Series: Klinefelter Trio
Tuesday, Oct. 10, 12-1 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall Eakins Lounge

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Oct. 16, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Mural Arts Tour: Mural Mile and Monument Lab
Sat., Oct. 21, 12-2 p.m.; tour start: NW corner of 10th and Locust Streets, tour end: Rittenhouse Square

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Oct. 23, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Murder at the Mütter
Sun., Oct. 29, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Mütter Museum, 19 S. 22nd St., Philadelphia

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Oct. 30, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Exploring Resilience for Health Professionals: What We Know, and What We Can Do
Mon., Oct. 30, 5-6:30 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall Atrium

Dean's Concert Series: The Franklin Quartet
Tuesday, Oct. 31, 12-1 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall Eakins Lounge

StorySlam: Resilience in Healthcare
Thurs., Nov. 2, 5-6:30 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall Atrium

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Nov. 6, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Developing Self-Compassion
Mon., Nov. 6, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 210/211

Roxane Gay: Hunger
Fri., Nov. 10, 7-8:30 p.m., Foerderer Auditorium, College Building

Theater of Witness: Walk In My Shoes
Sat., Nov. 11, 8 p.m., Painted Bride Art Center, 230 Vine Street

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Nov. 13, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Dean's Concert Series: Brian Ganz
Tuesday, Nov. 14, 12-1 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall Eakins Lounge

Theater of Witness: The Heart and Soul of Story
Weds., Nov. 15, 7-8:30 p.m., BLSB 105/107

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Nov. 20, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Nov. 27, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Reflective Leadership
Tues., Nov. 28, 5:30-6:30 p.m., JAH Brent Auditorium
Weds., Nov. 29, 12-1 p.m., JAH 407

Thrive: Trauma-Informed Practice in Community-Engaged Art
Sat., Dec. 2, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Dec. 4, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Journey Through Change
Mon., Dec. 4, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 210/211

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Dec. 11, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mon., Dec. 18, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Health Ecologies Reading Group 
Monday, January 22, 12-1 p.m. 
Scott Memorial Library - 200A

International Holocaust Remembrance Day: 50 Children: One Ordinary American Couple's Extraordinary Rescue Mission in the Heart of Nazi Germany
Thursday, January 25, 12 p.m.
Hamilton Building, Connelly Auditorium (1001 Locust Street)

InterAct Theatre Company: Sensitive Guys
Sunday, January 28, 2 p.m.-4 p.m., InterAct Theatre Company (302 South Hicks St.) 

Health Ecologies Reading Group 
Monday, January 29, 12-1 p.m. 
Scott Memorial Library - 200A

Health Ecologies Reading Group at Jefferson 
Mondays, 12-1 p.m.
Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A

Creative Approaches to Self-Care: Balance
Mon., Feb. 5, 5-7 p.m.
Hamilton 208/209 

Building Coalitions: Advocacy & Political Action as a Student (Leadership LIVE)
Mon., Feb. 5, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

Diversity Council Journal Club
Wednesday, February 7, 12 p.m. 
BLSB 107

Mark Morris Dance Group: Dances to American Music 
Friday, February 9, 8-10 PM
Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, 3680 Walnut Street

Dean's Concert Series: Plucks & Hammers - A mélange of music for guitar and piano
February 27, 12-1 p.m.
JAH Eakins Lounge

Physician Executive Leadership presents Dr. David Fajgenbaum
February 28, 6:30 p.m.
Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

Philadelphia Public Health Grand Rounds: Gun Violence in Philadelphia: Actions and Solutions
February 28, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, 19 S. 22nd Street

Transitioning Traditions: Expanding Art Therapy’s Reach
Saturday, March 10, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Jefferson East Falls, 4201 Henry Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19144

Dual Face | Dwimuka: Didik Nini Thowok
Sunday, March 11, 7 p.m.
International House Philadelphia, Ibrahim Theater (3701 Chestnut St.)

Film Screening & Discussion: Transparency & Physician-Patient Communication- The Story of Lewis Blackman 
Presented by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement - Jefferson Chapter
Tuesday, March 20, 7-8 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall room 207

Dean's Concert Series: Jefferson Chamber Orchestra
Tuesday, March 20, 12-1 p.m., JAH Eakins Lounge

Creative Arts Therapies Week: Exploring Identity Through Creativity
Thursday, March 22, 5-7 p.m., Scott Library room 200A

Creative Arts Therapies Week: Zentangle Workshop
Friday, March 23, 12-1:30pm, Hamilton 226

Creative Arts Therapies Week: Create Your Own Zen Garden
Friday, March 23, 3-4:30pm, 833 Chestnut Street, Suite 210-A, Room B-01

Equal Means Equal: Film Screening and Dinner
Tuesday, March 27, 5:30-8 p.m., JAH Atrium

An Evening with Nick Cave
Thursday, March 29, 7 p.m., Hamilton Building-Connelly Auditorium

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mondays, 12-1 p.m.
Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A and Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room M23

How Are We Free: Art Exhibition & Reception
Monday, April 2, 5:30 p.m., Scott Library room 200A

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Anxiety Management
Monday, April 2, 5-7 p.m., JAH M24

Jefferson Night at the Orchestra: Philadelphia Voices
Saturday, April 7, 6:30 p.m., Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, Verizon Hall

Dean's Concert Series: WindSync
Tuesday, April 10, 12-1 p.m., JAH Eakins Lounge

"Mind Games:" A Unique Educational Event to Advance Relationship Violence and Abuse (RVA) Awareness
Sunday, April 15, 4 p.m., Kanbar Performance Space, East Falls Campus (4201 Henry Avenue)

NODA Presents: What Children Learn About Death from Film
Monday, April 16, 12-1 p.m., JAH 307

Health Ecologies Reading Group
Mondays, 12-1 p.m., JAH M23 and Scott Library room 200A

HUMANITIES WEEK:

Confronting Racism, Bias, and Social Injustice in Healthcare Lecture Series: Dorothy Roberts
Tuesday, April 24, 12-1 p.m., Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

Philadelphia Gay Men's Chorus
Tuesday, April 24, 6 p.m., Hamilton Building, Connelly Auditorium

A Celebration of the Humanities
Thursday, April 26, 6-7:30 p.m., Hamilton Lobby

Fusion: Innovation Across Disciplines 
Friday, April 27, 10-2 p.m., Hamilton Building, Connelly Auditorium and Conrady Lobby

Creative Approaches to Self Care: Connection With Self and Others
Monday, May 7, 5-7 p.m., Hamilton 224/225