Jefferson Humanities & Health

Jefferson Humanities & Health Calendar

*Events marked with an asterisk can be counted toward the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate for Jefferson students.

^Events marked with an upward arrow can be counted toward the Anti-Racism in Health Focus, a subset of the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate. 

November 2022

Tuesday, November 29, 12-1 p.m., Eakins Lounge, Jefferson Alumni Hall

Lunch provided.

Theme: Collegiality In Times Of Isolation

ViolinistMargaret Humphrey maintains a vibrant freelance schedule as a soloist, chamber musician and orchestra member performing in ensembles in the US and Europe.

Cellist, Rebecca Humphrey is an active freelancer who has toured widely in the US, Brazil and Europe.

Pianist, Gilya Hodos concertized extensively both as a soloist and collaborative artist in Israel, Germany, Australia and throughout the US.  She is currently on the faculty at Penn State Abington and the Artistic Director for the Dean’s Concert Series at TJU.

Access the attendance survey for Asano participation credit here.

 

Wednesday, November 30, 12-1 p.m., BLSB 105

Open to all Jefferson students; all supplies and light snacks provided

Art is often used as a healing intervention and as a way to foster creativity. Attend Addressing Racial Trauma through Art and learn about racial trauma and how it impacts us and participate in an artistic method of expression of your diverse self. Engage in an art exercise that will help you explore your experience of the racial and ethnic violence occurring in our world and in our communities.  

The art supplies below will be provided. If you have favorite art materials you would enjoy working with, please feel free to bring your own supplies as well. 

  • Paper of various sizes and small canvas options  
  • Colored pencils, markers, paint 
  • Magazine, scissors, glue stick 

Facilitated by: Dr. Shawn Blue, Staff Psychologist, Student Counseling Center, Thomas Jefferson University. 

Co-presented by the Student Counseling Center and Jefferson Humanities & Health. 

December 2022

Monday, December 5, 5-6:30 p.m., BLSB 105

Each month, creative arts therapists lead writing, music & arts exercises that promote stress management & burnout prevention.

Engaging in creative play and laughter are effective methods for stress reduction. This in-person workshop will weave together elements of art, music, and laughter yoga to introduce new ways of rejuvenating your spirit. Facilitated by Peggy Tileston, MT-BC and Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care Series

In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Please note: This workshop is in-person and open to Jefferson students only; pre-registration required. 

Saturday, December 1012 - 1:30 p.m.Jack T. Franklin Auditorium, African American Museum in Philadelphia, 701 Arch Street, Philadelphia

Advance registration for students for this workshop is not required; please say that you are a student with Jefferson Humanities and Health in order to claim your ticket.

Join us at the African American Museum in Philadelphia for an art-based workshop with Collage artist, Doriana Diaz. Learn more about the Black Healthcare Studies exhibition from the artist and Assistant Curator, Zindzi Harley while participating in a meditative collaging activity.

Black Healthcare Studies

On View (In-Person): Jack T. Franklin Auditorium

October 6 - December 11, 2022

The Black Healthcare Studies exhibition explores the adverse history and barriers faced by Black students pursuing careers in healthcare. Through mixed media and collaged compositions artist, Doriana Diaz transforms everyday objects and archival materials into afro-futuristic depictions of Black figures in healthcare. Diaz draws inspiration from afro-feminist caretaking and activism histories, historical research, and personal testimonials from Janita Matoke, an upcoming Medical Student at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine who received her Master’s in Public Health at Thomas Jefferson University. Diaz’s artistry and Matoke’s scholarship converge for an interdisciplinary analysis of systemic racism faced by Black healthcare students and the unique culture and tools through which they transcend these hardships. The Black Healthcare Studies exhibition encourages visitors to rethink the context and utility of materials as tools for healing, self-care, preservation, and future building in Black communities. The AAMP iteration of the Black Healthcare Studies exhibition is the first of more immersive iterations to come.

Access the attendance survey for Asano credit here.

Tuesday, December 13, 12-1 p.m., Eakins Lounge, Jefferson Alumni Hall.

Lunch provided.

Theme: Triumph Over Adversity

Cellist Darrett Adkins is an avid chamber musician and performs and records in the US and Europe with Lions Gate Trio.  He serves on the cello and chamber music faculties of Juilliard School, the Oberlin Conservatory of Music and the Aspen Music Festival and School

Pianist and Violinist, Melvin Chen has received acclaim for solo and chamber performances throughout the US, Canada and Asia.  He is a professor in the practice of piano, teaches a studio of graduate and undergraduate piano students at the Yale School of Music.

Violinist, Solomiya Ivankhiv is an active soloist and chamber musician.  She is Assistant Professor of Violin and Viola and Head String at UCON and violin faculty at the Longy School of Bard College and was recently named Honored (Merited) Artist of Ukraine.

Access attendance survey for Asano participation here.

January 2023

Monday, January 9, 5-6:30 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 407

Seventy-six years after the liberation of Auschwitz the horror of the Shoah remains as haunting to mankind as ever, as indicated by countless books, documentaries, and monographs dedicated to the subject. Recent attention has gradually shifted away from “perpetrators” and focused instead on the “rescuers” – those few courageous souls who chose to risk their lives so that others could live. As the epitome of altruism for the betterment of mankind one would expect physicians to have been both rescuers and resisters during the Holocaust. Yet, German doctors were the most nazified profession in Hitler’s Reich, with every second male physician becoming a party member. In fact, many were perpetrators who not only provided “scientific” legitimization and manpower to domestic campaigns of sterilization and euthanasia, but who themselves participated in pseudo-scientific experiments on concentration camp prisoners. Hence, the need to revisit the topic.

Speaker: Salvatore Mangione, MD, is a clinician-educator with a long interest in physical diagnosis, medical history, community service and the role of the humanities in medicine. His innovative programs and engaging teaching style have been recognized by multiple teaching awards, and his work has been featured in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, the BBC, CNN, NPR, and Forbes. Dr. Mangione has been an invited speaker at many national and international meetings, especially in regard to using visual arts to teach bedside observation. He is the author of the book Secrets in Physical Diagnosis.

This event will also be live streamed on Zoom. Attendees will receive a Zoom link 48 hours prior to the event. 

Questions? Contact Kirsten Bowen, Humanities Program Coordinator, at kirsten.bowen@jefferson.edu.

Tuesday, January 23, 5-6 p.m., Online via Zoom

We all have a soundtrack that marks the many chapters of our lives. Teaching artist Josh Robinson and members from Jefferson student group JeffCHAT will facilitate a reflection through your musical past, your stories, and the role music has played throughout your life. The workshop uses music as a vehicle to help participants connect to others and reconnect to themselves. Participants will be guided to reflect on the meaning of various songs in their lives and how music has helped them through both positive and negative experiences. 

Co-presented by Jefferson Humanities & Health and JeffCHAT.

About the facilitator

Josh Robinson is a professional percussionist, teaching artist, and drum facilitator. He has been a visiting instructor in the Humanities at Thomas Jefferson University for the past four years and is in his second year as the Humanities artist-in-residence. For the past 19 years, Josh has used his skills, expertise, and life experience to share drumming and the many gifts it brings with thousands of people each year around the country. Learn more about Josh at joshrobinsondrums.com.

About JeffCHAT

JeffCHAT is a program designed by students for students at Thomas Jefferson University to promote mental health awareness and discussion about mental health. CHAT members are trained to serve as peer listeners for Jeff students who would like to talk about current concerns. Additionally, CHAT members work together and with staff to organize campus-wide social events that promote wellness. Learn more at jeffhelp.org/chatt.

This program is open to Jefferson students of all colleges and programs. Participants will receive a Zoom link for this virtual program starting 48 hours prior to the event.

Monday, January 23, 5-6:30 p.m., BLSB 105

Each month, creative arts therapists lead writing, music & arts exercises that promote stress management & burnout prevention.

Reconnecting

Research has shown that our relationships with ourselves, others, and nature have a profound impact on physical health and psychological well-being. In this in-person workshop, we will use the arts to explore ways of building and maintaining this all-important sense of connection. Facilitated by Peggy Tileston, MT-BC and Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care Series

In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Please note: This workshop is in-person and open to Jefferson students only; pre-registration required. Students who register and don't show up may not be able to register for future Jefferson Humanities & Health events.

Monday, January 31, 12-1 p.m., Eakins Lounge, Jefferson Alumni Hall

Lunch provided.

Theme:  Folk music

Woodwind specialist and vocalist, Ben Matus specializes in modern and historical bassoons. He performs regularly on Renaissance and Baroque recorders and a variety of historical and modern pipes.

Paul Holmes Morton, plays both classical and folk traditional music through his primary instrument, the guitar.

Fiona Gillespie is a Philadelphia-based folk and classical singer, instrumentalist and songwriter who was raised in a family of traditional Celtic musicians.  

Bradley King a specialist in early music, performs regularly in a broad range of programs from contemporary to ancient. A classical tenor, he favors the cello and electric bass in an accompanist role and brings his background in Appalachian singing to the folk stage.

Genevieve Gillespie King has played at most major folk music festivals in the US and has toured England, Ireland and Canada.  She has been playing the Irish fiddle since she was four years old.

Access the attendance survey for Asano participation credit here.

Tuesday, January 31, 5:30-7 p.m., Connelley Auditorium, Dorrance H. Hamilton Building, 1001 Locust Street

Britt Wray’s fascinating and hopeful new talk demonstrates the emotional and existential effects of living in a warming world—and how we can get through them together. Although anxieties surrounding the climate crisis can cause us to burn out, give up, and question deeply personal decisions like whether to have children, working through these anxieties can unlock a deep capacity to care for and act on climate issues. 

We need to look at the climate crisis as a whole—not just the political or technological issues, but the mental health consequences as well. These effects can be severe, even leading people affected by climate events to experience PTSD and a loss of identity. To combat this, Britt presents practical tips and strategies for healthily and productively dealing with our emotions, living with climate trauma, and strengthening our communities so we can combat climate change together.

Science storyteller Britt Wray, PhD, is the author of the books Generation Dread: Finding Purpose in an Age of Climate Crisis (2022, Knopf-Random House) and Rise of the Necrofauna: The Science, Ethics and Risks of De-Extinction (published in 2017 by Greystone Books in partnership with The David Suzuki Institute). She has been a contributing host on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s national science TV show The Nature of Things, co-host of the BBC podcast Tomorrow’s World and guest host of Canada’s national radio show CBC Quirks and Quarks. Over the last decade, Wray has produced narrative science documentaries for outlets such as BBC Radio 4, CBC Radio 1, NPR, and Love and Radio. Wray holds degrees in biology and media arts as well as a PhD in Science Communication (with a focus on synthetic biology) from the University of Copenhagen. Wray was a 2019 TED Resident, a 2019 Logan Nonfiction Fellow at the Carey Institute for Global Good, and has been a Visiting Scholar at NYU’s Arthur L. Carter Institute for Journalism. She is currently a Human and Planetary Health Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University in the Center for Innovation in Global Health, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

About the Jefferson Humanities Forum

Each academic year, Jefferson Humanities & Health explores a thought-provoking theme from a wide range of perspectives, inviting reflection and action around how we improve lives. During 2022-2023, the Jefferson Humanities Forum hosts multidisciplinary scholars and thinkers to investigate the theme of Repair.

Questions? Contact Kirsten Bowen, Humanities Program Coordinator, Student Affairs, at kirsten.bowen@jefferson.edu.