Jefferson Humanities & Health

Past Events

For Events marked with an astericks (*) offers credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, if you would like to receive credit, please fill out this attendance form after the event. All event attendance forms can be found in their respective event listings or on Canvas. 

Note: Below are the past events for the past two academic years, starting in July 2021. Should you need historical information about events prior to July 2021, please contact the Jefferson Humanities & Health office.

2022 - 2023: Repair

November 2022

Wednesday, November 30, 12-1 p.m., BLSB 105

Open to all Jefferson students; all supplies and light snacks provided

Art is often used as a healing intervention and as a way to foster creativity. Attend Addressing Racial Trauma through Art and learn about racial trauma and how it impacts us and participate in an artistic method of expression of your diverse self. Engage in an art exercise that will help you explore your experience of the racial and ethnic violence occurring in our world and in our communities.  

The art supplies below will be provided. If you have favorite art materials you would enjoy working with, please feel free to bring your own supplies as well. 

  • Paper of various sizes and small canvas options  
  • Colored pencils, markers, paint 
  • Magazine, scissors, glue stick 

Facilitated by: Dr. Shawn Blue, Staff Psychologist, Student Counseling Center, Thomas Jefferson University. 

Co-presented by the Student Counseling Center and Jefferson Humanities & Health. 

Tuesday, November 29, 12-1 p.m., Eakins Lounge, Jefferson Alumni Hall

Lunch provided.

Theme: Collegiality In Times Of Isolation

Violinist, Margaret Humphrey maintains a vibrant freelance schedule as a soloist, chamber musician and orchestra member performing in ensembles in the US and Europe.

Cellist, Rebecca Humphrey is an active freelancer who has toured widely in the US, Brazil and Europe.

Pianist, Gilya Hodos concertized extensively both as a soloist and collaborative artist in Israel, Germany, Australia and throughout the US.  She is currently on the faculty at Penn State Abington and the Artistic Director for the Dean’s Concert Series at TJU.

Access the attendance survey for Asano participation credit here.

Monday, November 21, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Open to all Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Reading: “Joshua: Under Contract,” a chapter from The Beauty In Breaking: A Memoir (Penguin, 2020) by Michele Harper. Join a discussion about one night of Harper's ER work in a Veterans' hospital and how two very different patients helped her change her thinking about what it means to "cure" someone. She also discusses the difficulties of everyday life outside her work at the hospital and how to find peace in those places.

Facilitator: Katherine Hubbard, MA, Teaching Instructor, JeffMD Humanities Selectives, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Access the Reading:
Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session. To access the reading, participants must visit the Health Humanities Reading Group module in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas. Most Asano students are already users in the Humanities & Health Canvas course. If that is not the case, participants may email Kirsten Bowen, Humanities Program Coordinator, at kirsten.bowen@jefferson.edu.

Paperback copies of The Beauty in Breaking will be available for attendees after the discussion. 

About the Health Humanities Reading Group:
The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers regularly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session.

Thursday, November 17, 5:30-7 p.m., Eakins Lounge, Jefferson Alumni Hall 

The Drs. Theresa and Charles Yeo Writing Prize, the annual writing contest of the Eakins Writing Project, is an invitation for all members of the Jefferson community to engage in the empowering act of writing. Our roles as members of a large health system place each of us in a unique opportunity to witness and be a part of incredible stories every day. The Prize is a call to share those stories and recognize the impact they can have on ourselves and our community. Opening remarks from Laura Madeleine, Executive Director and Curator, Souls Shot Portrait Project. To be followed by a reading of the prize-winning essays and light refreshments. 

Access the attendance survey for Asano credit here.

Wednesday, November 16, 5-6:30 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 407 

This session is open to all Jefferson students, residents, faculty, and staff. Registration is encouraged, not required.

This lecture will cover Deaf people in the arts from the 20th century to present. The presenter for this workshop will be Charles McGowan, who has a Bachelor's in History and Deaf Studies, as well as a Masters in Deaf Education. There have been numerous Deaf artists, poets, musicians, in theatre, and more. The Deaf experience as expressed through the arts will be the primary focus in this conversation. 

The DEAFMed lecture series is organized by Natalie Perlov, SKMC Class of 2025, as part of her Scholarly Inquiry-Humanities project.

Wednesday, November 16, 4-5:30 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 207

Open to Jefferson students, staff and faculty from all colleges and programs.

Every person has a story. In this candid conversation series, we’ll talk with community members about their real experiences at the intersection of healthcare, wellbeing and identity. Each guest brings unique insights and expertise into problems of health that span social and clinical dimensions, and engage questions of access, equity and justice. Sessions will be led by an interprofessional team of Jefferson student moderators and include interactive Q&A with attendees.

Special Guest: Jibri Douglas
Jibri Douglas (they/them) hails from Newark, NJ, and is currently a 2LE part-time law student at Rutgers Law School. In 2010, Jibri graduated from the University of Georgia with a Bachelor's degree in Health Promotion and Behavior. Since graduating from UGA, Jibri has worked tirelessly in the HIV/AIDS field in many capacities, primarily with LGBT homeless youth, substance users, and formerly incarcerated women of color. In 2017, Jibri graduated with a Master of Public Health degree from Drexel University, concentrating in Health Management and Policy. Today, Jibri is the Program Manager of Family Planning for a local Philadelphia non-profit. Jibri started identifying as trans*/non-binary around 2012 while working at Jersey City Medical Center. Having endured discrimination during the beginning of their transition, Jibri started the Pride Promise LGBTQ Initiative at Jersey City Medical Center. Jibri is continuing their transition journey, having legally changed their name in March 2020. Currently, they are battling the insurance company with hopes of getting their chest masculinization surgery covered.

Additionally, Jibri identifies as a social entrepreneur who over the years has slowly married their background in public health to entrepreneurship. Jibri started their journey in 2008 by publishing their first poetry book "Old Vs. New: The Chronicles of Growth" selling over 300 copies in undergrad. In 2015, after successfully launching the first hospital-wide LGBTQ healthcare initiative in Hudson County, NJ, Jibri founded TJD Medical Consulting, a small Diversity and Inclusion boutique consulting firm with a focus on healthcare organizations. In 2019, Jibri transitioned into real estate development. After years of working in public health and seeing the impacts of housing blight on communities, Jibri created Noire Real Estate, LLC.

Student moderators:

Col Del Duke (she/they), MPH, JCPH, Class of 2023

Mallika Kodavatiganti (she/her), SKMC, Class of 2026

Ilyse Kramer (she/her), MLIS, MPA OTDP, JCRS, Class of 2023

Community Voices is presented by the Jefferson College of Population Health, the Jefferson Center for Interprofessional Practice & Education, and Jefferson Humanities & Health.

Please note: The following community event is organized by Inis Nua Theatre Company and sponsored by Jefferson Humanities & Health.

Monday, November 14, 7-8:30 p.m. 

The Louis Bluver Theatres at The Drake, 302 South Hicks Street (off Spruce Street between 15th and 16th Streets) 

Free and open to Jefferson students, faculty, staff and the public. 

Inis Nua Theatre Company presents the Philadelphia premiere of "Love Song to Lavender Menace" by James Ley (2017). This play reading is directed by David Bardeen and performed by actors Kirk Wendell Brown, Max Gallagher and Brennen Malone. 

About the play: The United Kingdom in the 1980s was a turbulent place. But one bookshop in Edinburgh dared to be a beacon for gay and lesbian people at a time when that could be downright dangerous. James Ley’s celebratory play Love Song to Lavender Menace pays tribute to a bookstore that challenged the heteronormative world with gusto, song and yes, actual paper books. The first reading in Inis Nua's yearlong Queer Connections Reading Series, this play shines a light on the LGBTQ community in Scotland as well as reverence for the printed word.

Monday, November 14, 5-6 p.m., Online via Zoom

Each month, creative arts therapists lead writing, music & arts exercises that promote stress management & burnout prevention.

We often think that doing nothing is relaxing, but we may not be allowing ourselves to truly rest and be restored. This virtual workshop will engage you in music-based relaxation that supports deeper breathing, body awareness and imagery to experience a more grounded, calmer way of relaxing. Facilitated by Peggy Tileston, MT-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care Series

In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Monday, November 14, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton 224/225

Join a discussion exploring how women throughout Jefferson’s history have impacted and shaped the University and hospital into the institution it is today. What can we learn from the past and apply to change the future? Jefferson’s own university archivist Michael Angelo will give a quick introduction to the talk given by second-year medical student Anna Lauriello.

This event is co-hosted by Jefferson’s chapter of the American Medical Women’s Association and is open to all members of the Jefferson Community.

Speakers: F. Michael Angelo, MA, and Anna Lauriello, MS2, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

The Hidden History of Women at Jefferson is organized by Anna Lauriello, SKMC Class of 2025, as part of her Scholarly Inquiry-Humanities project.

Wednesday, November 9, 12-1 PM, Hamilton 628

A speaker panel featuring Dr. Kathleen G. Mechler, a family medicine physician who specializes in hospice and palliative care, will share their experiences working in palliative and hospice care, and will answer questions regarding end of life care. Join us for an inspiring and insightful conversation!

Lunch from Top Tomato will be provided!

Attending this event will count towards Asano Humanities club credit. If you would like to receive credit for the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate, please note that attendance will be taken by the event's student organizers. 

Tuesday, November 8, 12-1 p.m., Hamilton 505

Open to all Jefferson students, staff and faculty; lunch provided. 

Presenter: Kesha Morant Williams, PhD., Senior Advisor for College Diversity, Equity & Belonging, Elizabethtown College

This presentation challenges participants to consider their Center or what guides the way they show up and operate in the world by examining dominant models of health communication. More specifically participants (1) gain an increased awareness of cultural considerations during health interactions, (2) analyze examples highlighting the need for cultural respect in health care interactions (3) receive a model for implementing relationship-centered aspects of health communication in professional interactions. 

An accomplished communicator and researcher, Dr. Kesha Morant Williams works to improve health and well-being by building community social capital through writing, speaking, researching and teaching. She is the author of The Color of STEM, a booklet highlighting the experiences of Black and Brown young women interested in careers in science, technology, engineering, and math, and co-editor of Reifying Women's Experiences with Invisible Illness.

Thursday, November 3, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Graham Auditorium, Moore College of Art & Design, 1916 Race Street, Philadelphia

Free and open to all.

This event is co-presented by Mural Arts Philadelphia, Jefferson Humanities & Health, and Moore’s Socially Engaged Art MFA and MA programs.

This multi-city event features arts organizers from Philadelphia, Baltimore, and New York City. They will reflect on their work, group organizational structures and strategies, what they’ve learned in the last two years and aspirations for organizing moving forward. This event should be of interest to students and practitioners interested in the role of art in public space making, community organizing and supporting community thriving. Convened on the occasion of Southeast by Southeast’s 10th anniversary, this program will put that work in Southeast Philadelphia in dialogue with other inspiring practices. 

Join us for presentations by Shira Walinsky about Southeast by Southeast a community space through Mural Arts (Philadelphia); Laila Islam and Isa Matisse about the Future Is Us Collective (Philadelphia); Rheagen King and Joseph Orzal about Nomunomu (Baltimore); and Diane Wong about Chinatown Art Brigade (New York City). 

About the Speakers

The Future is Us Collective, founded as a youth coalition of 8 artists in 2017, exists as an all-inclusive visual arts collective based in Philadelphia. We provide free platforms for emerging artists to showcase their artworks while giving young Philadelphians a safe space to enjoy the arts. In addition to exhibitions, we facilitate public programming for young creatives, cultivating spaces where participants can collectively process trauma, share knowledge, and create art. As a collective we are organized and facilitated by young adults, serving with a "For Us By Us" model.

Diane Wong is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University, Newark and an affiliate faculty of Global Urban Studies, American Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies. Her research and teaching interests include American politics, race and ethnicity, critical urban studies, comparative immigration, gender and sexuality, cultural and media studies, and community rooted research. Her current book project, You Can’t Evict A Movement: Intergenerational Activism and Housing Justice in New York City, combines ethnography, participatory mapping, archival research, augmented reality, and oral history interviews to examine intergenerational resistance to gentrification in Manhattan Chinatown. Her work has appeared in Urban Affairs Review, Women's Studies Quarterly, Amerasia Journal, PS: Political Science & Politics, Politics, Groups, and Identities, Gateways, Journal of Asian American Studies, and a variety of edited book volumes, anthologies, podcasts, and exhibitions. As a socially engaged artist, Diane is a member of the Chinatown Art Brigade and co-founder of The W.O.W. project, a queer, non-binary, trans youth-led initiative based out of Manhattan Chinatown that uses arts activism to combat displacement.

Chinatown Art Brigade is a cultural collective of artists, media makers and activists creating art and media to advance social change. Our work focuses on the belief that collaboration with and accountability to those communities that are directly impacted by racial, social and economic inequities must be central to cultural, art, or media making process. Through art and public projections, CAB aims to share stories of Chinatown tenants to fight displacement and gentrification. Chinatown Art Brigade collaborates with the Chinatown Tenants Union of CAAAV Organizing Asian Communities, a non-profit organization that fights against tenant rights violation, evictions, and displacement of low-income pan-Asian communities.

NoMüNoMü is an intersectional arts collaborative working to challenge the perpetual systems of oppression within and beyond the art world. We work collaboratively with artists + grassroots organizations at the intersections of race, age, gender and orientation. We see collaboration in the arts as a means to challenge the status quo, specifically in informing movements of decolonization, resource sharing, and learning new ways of being within and through the field of art.

Shira Walinsky is an artist and educator in Philadelphia. She co-teaches Big Pictures Mural Arts in Philadelphia with Jane Golden, Director of the Mural Arts Program at the University of Pennsylvania. She has worked with Mural Arts Philadelphia since 2000 creating over 40 murals. Much of her work centers on migration. She has worked as a socially engaged artist embedded for ten years in South Philadelphia with new communities. She creates participatory work that is often a hybrid of events, teaching and visual artifacts from the process. Her recent work has centered on portraits of and with community members. In 2022 she showed six short videos at Scribe created with Karen and Bhutanese refugee communities. She believes in the role art can play both in classrooms to empower and to make visible those communities who are often not seen or heard in the city.  She is inspired by the struggles and vibrant spaces of the city, where history and growth run parallel. 

In 2012, she developed the Southeast by Southeast storefront space with Melissa Fogg and Miriam Singer. Southeast By Southeast is a community arts space for and with refugee, immigrant and migrant communities in South Philadelphia.Through the space she created projects and programs that bridge mental health, storytelling, art and learning, poetry and film, citizenship and community building. Since 2019 she has developed six films centering on the stories of Karen from Burma and Bhutanese from Nepal families through the project Making Home Movies. Shira co-teaches at the University of Pennsylvania with Jane Golden. She is a lead artist advisor with the Mural Arts Institute supporting artists in Santa Fe, Portland and sharing practices of public art and engagement at workshops across the globe.

Thursday, October 27, 5:30-7 p.m., Jefferson Alumni Hall (1020 Locust Street), Room 307

Join us for the inaugural Carlin Foundation Annual Lecture on Healthcare Innovation, presented by the Jefferson Humanities Forum.

Rushika Fernandopulle: Repairing Healthcare

What does it take to transform values of health equity and patient-centered care into industry-changing business models?

Rushika Fernandopulle, MD, MPP, is a physician who has spent decades improving the quality of healthcare delivered to patients. He is Chief Innovation Officer at One Medical, a membership-based primary care practice on a mission to make getting quality care more affordable, accessible, and enjoyable for all. He was co-founder and CEO of Iora Health, a value-based care primary care group based in Boston MA that delivered better quality, lower costs and improved satisfaction for both patients and teammates. Rushika joined One Medical as part of the One Medical acquisition of Iora in 2021. Rushika was the first Executive Director of the Harvard Interfaculty Program for Health Systems Improvement, and Managing Director of the Clinical Initiatives Center at the Advisory Board Company. He is a member of the Albert Schweitzer, Ashoka, Aspen, and Salzburg Global Fellowships. He serves on the staff at the Massachusetts General Hospital, on the faculty of Harvard Medical School, and on the boards of Families USA and the Schwartz Center for Compassionate Care. He earned his A.B., M.D., and M.P.P. from Harvard University, and completed his clinical training at the University of Pennsylvania and the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Moderator: Marc-David Munk, MD, MPH, MHCM, Sidney Kimmel Medical College Class of 2003, is President of Steward Health Care Middle East, the Dubai-based affiliate of Dallas-headquartered Steward Health Care, and Co-Founder of the Carlin Foundation. After graduating from SKMC, Dr. Munk completed his residency and fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh and later completed a master’s degree in management from Harvard University. He has since held a variety of leadership roles in academic, government and new-entrant healthcare companies—including serving as Chief Medical Officer and VP for Accountable Care at Iora Health from 2016 to 2018, where he was mentored by Dr. Fernandopulle. Dr. Munk and his spouse, Dr. Martina Stippler, Associate Professor and Vice-Chief of Neurosurgery at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, have led the Carlin Foundation since its inception in 2018.

About the Carlin Foundation Annual Lecture on Healthcare Innovation

The purpose of the Carlin Foundation Annual Lecture on Healthcare Innovation to stimulate innovation in medicine and medical care delivery by exposing students and other attendees to notable speakers and ideas. The Foundation encourages the selection of speakers who will challenge participants to think creatively and innovatively about the difficulties and opportunities facing healthcare, looking, in particular, to experts and industries outside of healthcare.

About the Jefferson Humanities Forum

Each academic year, Jefferson Humanities & Health explores a thought-provoking theme from a wide range of perspectives, inviting reflection and action around how we improve lives. During 2022-2023, the Jefferson Humanities Forum hosts multidisciplinary scholars and thinkers to investigate the theme of Repair.

Wednesday, October 26, 5-6:30 p.m., BLSB 105

Deaf culture is highly visual. Deaf spaces are populated not only by signers, but also by carefully designed built environments. What happens when film, television, and other visual media frame these spaces for hearing audiences?

In this session, we’ll view clips from recent films such as Sound of Metal and CODA (winner of Academy Award for Best Picture 2021) as well as from TV series and social media. How do these representations train hearing people who are not fluent signers to see and understand d/Deaf people and Deaf culture? To conclude, we’ll invite conversation about the impact of this hearing gaze on how hearing clinicians perceive and interact with d/Deaf patients and family members.

Our presenters are Kristin Lindgren and Jess Libow. We are two hearing women whose research and teaching focuses on literature, visual culture, and disability studies. Kristin has taught in the Writing Program at Haverford College for over 25 years, and Jess joined the Haverford faculty as Visiting Assistant Professor of Writing in fall 2022. Kristin has co-edited two books about Deaf Culture: Signs and Voices: Deaf Culture, Identity, Language, and Arts, and Access, both published by Gallaudet University Press. Jess studied American Sign Language for two years, including a summer at Gallaudet University.

The DEAFMed lecture series is organized by Natalie Perlov, SKMC Class of 2025, as part of her Scholarly Inquiry-Humanities project.

Monday, October 24, 4-5:30 p.m., Connelly Auditorium, Hamilton Building

Open to all Jefferson students, staff and faculty; light refreshments provided.  

How can we heal from the wounds we don’t talk about? This year's Interprofessional Story Slam will feature five-minute stories that help us consider questions of repair and healing told by Jefferson students, faculty and staff. Members of the Jefferson community will share their stories of emotionally processing impactful mistakes, challenges with mental health, and experiences including trauma, bias, stereotyping and discrimination.

Storytellers:

David Nash, MD, MBA, Founding Dean Emeritus, Dr. Raymond C. and Doris N. Grandon Professor, Jefferson College Population Health

Ilyse Kramer, MLIS, MPA, Occupational Therapy Doctorate Program, Class of 2023, Jefferson College of Rehabilitation Sciences

Jennifer Leah Peck, MFA, Curriculum Technology Specialist, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Instructor, Jefferson Online

Kathryn M. Shaffer, EdD, MSN, CCFP, FNAP, Associate Professor, Jefferson College of Nursing

Moderated by Jefferson students Yazmine Manzanet, Martinique Ogle, Carolyn Ream, and Matthew Rodriguez.

Co-presented by Jefferson Humanities & Health, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, and the Jefferson Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education (JCIPE).

Saturday, October 22, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Lubert Plaza, Locust Street between 10th and 11th Streets

Loosen up your drawing style and breathe new creativity into your art-making with artist and Fleisher Art Memorial instructor Bernard Collins.

During the class we will explore both drawing and watercolor techniques. Our subject will be The Urban Landscape, interior and exterior spaces. This will be a class accessible to both inexperienced and experienced artists interested in trying out the medium of watercolors. Materials will be provided.

About the Instructor

Bernard Collins, Jr., has a BFA from Temple University Tyler School of Art and an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania in painting. He has taught at Fleisher Art Memorial since 2007. Currently he teaches watercolor, Urban Landscape and Drawing classes at Fleisher.

Saturday, October 15, 2022, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Pinizzotto-Ammon Alumni Center (Jefferson Alumni Hall, Suite 210)

Jefferson students from ALL colleges and programs are invited to attend this event, which is part of SKMC Alumni Weekend

The SKMC Alumni Board’s Inclusion, Diversity & Equity Alliance (I.D.E.A.) Subcommittee hosts an exclusive panel discussion for physicians, healthcare providers, and medical students. Listen as experts share insights on the varied aspects of serving diverse patient populations and the disparities faced in many communities. Afterward, alumni and students are invited to network over light refreshments.

Panelists:

Ana María López, MD ’88, MPH
Professor and Interim-Chair, Medical Oncology and Professor of Integrative Medicine and Nutritional Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Medical College
Director, Integrative Oncology
Associate Director, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Medical Director, Medical Oncology and Chief of Cancer Services, Jefferson Health New Jersey, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, NCI Designated
Thomas Jefferson University

Edith P. Mitchell, MD
Clinical Professor, Medical Oncology, SKMC
Enterprise Associate Director for Cancer Disparities, Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson Health

John P. Williams, MD
Breast Cancer Surgeon
Member, President’s Cancer Panel, National Institute of Health

Moderator: 

Irfan Galaria, MD ’01, MBA
Chair, Inclusion, Diversity & Equity Alliance Committee, SKMC Alumni Association
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon, Galaria Plastic Surgery & Dermatology and Inova Health System

Friday, October 14, 1:30-3 p.m., Pinizzotto-Ammon Alumni Center (Jefferson Alumni Hall, Suite 210)

Jefferson students from ALL colleges and programs are invited to attend this event, which is part of SKMC Alumni Weekend

Take a journey into Jefferson and Sidney Kimmel Medical College’s remarkable history and incredible treasures from the University Archives and Special Collections with University Archivist and Head of Historic Collections F. Michael Angelo, MA. Afterward, spend time exploring the Pinizzotto-Ammon Alumni Center’s library of yearbooks, issues of The Bulletin, and collection of historical artifacts.

Wednesday, October 12, 5:30-7 p.m., BLSB 105

Open to Jefferson students, staff and faculty from all colleges and programs.

Every person has a story. In this candid conversation series, we’ll talk with community members about their real experiences at the intersection of healthcare, wellbeing and identity. Each guest brings unique insights and expertise into problems of health that span social and clinical dimensions, and engage questions of access, equity and justice. Sessions will be led by an interprofessional team of Jefferson student moderators and include interactive Q&A with attendees.

Special guest: Bella

Bella is a housing advocate and an educator. She will be speaking to attendees about her experiences navigating the healthcare and housing systems while being homeless. She brings the perspective of the invisible homeless – folks who fell on hard times and lost their homes but did not necessarily end up on the streets. She asserts that good health requires stable housing. How can healthcare professionals become proactive partners in advancing these goals?

Jefferson student moderators:

Madison Smith, SKMC, Class of 2026

Christopher Wetzel, MD-MPH, SKMC/JCPH, Class of 2024

Community Voices is presented by the Jefferson College of Population Health, the Jefferson Center for Interprofessional Practice & Education, and Jefferson Humanities & Health.

Monday, October 3, 12-1 p.m., Scott Memorial Library 200A

Open to all Jefferson students, faculty, and staff

Reading/Listening:

This week, the Health Humanities Reading Group explores the life and legacy of Henrietta Lacks, whose cervical cells, taken and used without her knowledge, have played a role in modernity as we know it: from vaccines to medicine to space travel. Lacks’ story is unique but also representative of the pervasive mistreatment of Black people by institutions of medicine, science, education, and healthcare.

Special guest discussant: Ana Mari­a Lopez, MD, MPH, MACP, Professor and Vice Chair, Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Chief of Cancer Services, Jefferson Health New Jersey, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center

Wednesday, October 5, 5-6:30 p.m., BLSB 105

Open to Jefferson students, residents, faculty and staff in all colleges and programs. Registration is encouraged, not required. 

This lecture will cover important and helpful terms to know in regard to using American Sign Language (ASL) in the medical setting. The presenter for this workshop, Karen Kennedy, has a wealth of experience working in medical settings as a Deaf interpreter. You will learn how to better communicate with Deaf and hard-of-hearing people in a medical setting, as well as other tools at your disposal beyond ASL.

The DEAFMed lecture series is organized by Natalie Perlov, SKMC Class of 2025, as part of her Scholarly Inquiry-Humanities project.

Monday, October 10, 5-6 p.m.

Open to all Jefferson students

In order to effectively care for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This virtual workshop will introduce you to a variety of art-based experiences designed to promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Facilitated by Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care series
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by an arts therapist and music therapist, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Co-presented with the Student Counseling Center (SCC). Pre-registration required.

September 2022

This lecture will cover the important milestones in Deaf history, from the 19th century to present (plus a few tidbits going as far back as Ancient Greece). The presenter for this workshop will be Charles McGowan, who has a Bachelor's in History and Deaf Studies, as well as a Masters in Deaf Education. You will learn about how politics, education, community, and other factors contributed to the current state of Deaf culture and community in the United States. 

This session is open to all students, residents, faculty, and staff at Jefferson. Registration is encouraged, not required. 

This DEAFMed lecture series is put together by Natalie Perlov, SKMC Class of 2025, as part of her Humanities Scholarly Inquiry project.

 

Christiana Cruz-Council, curator of the current PAFA exhibition "Strange Sensations: The Startling and Surreal in PAFA's Permanent Collection," will be in conversation with Dr. Sami Khella, the Chief of the Department of Neurology at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, a Professor of Clinical Neurology, and exhibiting artist, about the artistic impulse to visually express experiences of trauma, illness, and pain. Centering the work in "Strange Sensations," Dr. Khella and Cruz-Council will talk about how visualizing frightening experiences can help us better understand them, as well as aid the artist's individual journey of self-care.

Please note, the following event is hosted by the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA) and open to the general public. This event may be counted toward the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate; details below.  

Did you know that Thomas Jefferson University is an institutional member at PAFA? To visit PAFA for free, simply show your Jefferson student ID at the door. 

In the first workshop of this series, we will focus on grounding and centering skills. The group will utilize art, music and movement and each participant will leave with a set of tools and skills that can be applied as needed throughout the school year. Facilitated by Peggy Tileston, MT-BC and Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care Series
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by an arts therapist and music therapist, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion.

Co-presented with the Student Counseling Center (SCC). Pre-registration required. 

Every person has a story. In this candid conversation series, we’ll talk with community members about their real experiences at the intersection of healthcare, wellbeing and identity. Each guest brings unique insights and expertise into problems of health that span social and clinical dimensions, and engage questions of access, equity and justice. Sessions will be led by an interprofessional team of Jefferson student moderators and include interactive Q&A with attendees.

Special guest: Eddie Dunn

In 2014, while experiencing homelessness and using drugs in Philadelphia, Eddie Dunn met artist Willie Baronet and was featured in Baronet’s documentary film, Signs of Humanity. Months later, while in recovery, Dunn reconnected with Baronet and shared how his life had changed, ultimately joining Baronet for a series of public events geared toward fighting stigma around homelessness and opioid use disorder. In 2017, the pair teamed up with Jefferson professor of Population Health Rosie Frasso and have worked together on several arts-informed projects designed to shed light on the challenges faced by people in need. 

Jefferson student moderators:

Tiffany Buturla, MPH, SKMC Class of 2026 
Bahram Pashaee, MPH, SKMC Class of 2026

Community Voices is presented by the Jefferson College of Population Health, the Jefferson Center for Interprofessional Practice & Education, and Jefferson Humanities & Health.

This event may be counted toward the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate program for Jefferson students. 

We are facing a tumultuous future that requires a unified and strategic approach to human rights. To create this future, we must weave our strengths together and use our differences as a platform for modeling a positive future built on justice and the politics of love. We need to make a commitment to recognize and support each other by calling people in rather than calling them out. 

Loretta J. Ross is an award-winning, nationally-recognized expert on racism and racial justice, women's rights, and human rights. Her work emphasizes the intersectionality of social justice issues and how intersectionality can fuel transformation. Ross is a visiting associate professor at Smith College (Northampton, MA) in the Program for the Study of Women and Gender. She was a co-founder and the National Coordinator, from 2005 to 2012, of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. 

Ross has co-written three books on reproductive justice: Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive JusticeReproductive Justice: An Introduction; and Radical Reproductive Justice: Foundations, Theory, Practice, Critique. Her latest book, Calling In the Calling Out Culture, is forthcoming in 2022 from publisher Simon & Schuster. 

Ross is a rape survivor, was forced to raise a child born of incest, and is a survivor of sterilization abuse. She is a model of how to survive and thrive despite the traumas that disproportionately affect low-income women of color. She is a graduate of Agnes Scott College and holds an honorary Doctorate of Civil Law degree awarded in 2003 from Arcadia University and a second honorary doctorate degree awarded from Smith College in 2013. She is pursuing a PhD in Women’s Studies at Emory University in Atlanta. She is a mother, grandmother and a great-grandmother.

Following her talk, Professor Ross will be conversation with Karima Bouchenafa, MA, Assistant Director, Philadelphia University Honors Institute at Thomas Jefferson University.

During 2022-2023, the Jefferson Humanities Forum hosts multidisciplinary scholars and thinkers to investigate the theme of Repair. 

Kintsugi is the ancient Japanese art of pottery mending. For centuries, when a bowl breaks, the pieces are connected back together by a Japanese craftsman using lacquer infused with gold. While the defects thus become visible, the new piece is still regarded as more valuable and more beautiful than the original. We’ll discuss how this art form symbolizes the importance and value of self-compassion and self-acceptance. Self-compassion, the mindful practice of being kind to yourself and accepting your humanity, has been shown to help coping, lessen the fear of failure, promote happiness and life satisfaction, and lessen self-criticism and perfectionism. We’ll work with broken bowls while learning some tools to bring more self-compassion into our lives. Accepting our imperfections and flaws will be encouraged so that the beauty of who we are comes shining through. This 90-minute workshop will be facilitated by Dr. Donald Friedman. 

About the facilitator

Don Friedman, MD, is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at SKMC. He is a retired rheumatologist who was Chief of the Section of Rheumatology at Crozer-Chester Medical Center for 28 years. At SKMC, he has taught Introduction to Clinical Medicine and sessions on Professionalism and is currently a facilitator for CBL 1 and CBL 2. He has also facilitated the Healer’s Art at Jefferson for 11 years and is presently Director of the course. Don has done professional training with Rachel Remen at RISHI (the Remen Institute for the Study of Health and Illness) and Christina Puchalski at GWish (George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health). He has also participated in workshops run by Animas Valley Institute, Omega Institute, Garrison Institute, Copper Beech Institute, the Kripalu Center, and the Center for Mindful Self-Compassion.

Open to Jefferson students, faculty and staff. Limited to 15 registrants with lunch and free copies of the book provided. Please cancel at least 24 hours in advance so that others can attend. 

Reading: “Real Women have Bodies,” a short story from Her Body and Other Stories by Carmen Maria Machado (Graywolf Press, 2017). In this short story, a mysterious outbreak causes some women’s bodies to gradually fade out of sight. Join us for a discussion of this intriguing story centered around bodies, invisibility, domestic trauma and a very specific pandemic. Machado pushes at real world issues using literary tropes of humor, horror and fantasy and her stories always provoke rich discussion.

Facilitator: Katherine Hubbard, MA, Teaching Instructor, JeffMD Humanities Selectives, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

Paperback copies of Her Body and Other Stories will be available for attendees after the discussion. 

Access the Reading
Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session. To access the reading, participants must visit the Health Humanities Reading Group module in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas. Most Asano students are already users in the Humanities & Health Canvas course. If that is not the case, participants should email Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, at Megan.Voellerr@jefferson.edu.

About HHRG
The Health Humanities Reading Group (HHRG) gathers regularly to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session.

Percussionist and Humanities visiting instructor Josh Robinson invites you to "Drum It Out!" This interactive workshop uses drumming as a coping tool, a vehicle for healthy expression and emotional release, and a fun way to connect with others in an authentic and engaging way. Participants should have on-hand some found objects such as wooden spoons, dowels to make noise on buckets or trash bins.

About the facilitator: Josh Robinson is a professional percussionist, teaching artist, and drum facilitator. He has been a visiting instructor in the Humanities at Thomas Jefferson University for the past four years and the former Humanities artist-in-residence. For the past 19 years, Josh has used his skills, expertise, and life experience to share drumming and the many gifts it brings with thousands of people each year around the country.

August 2022

This lecture is a "crash course" on communicating with Deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals in the United States. You will learn about Deaf culture, American Sign Language (ASL), the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and other relevant laws, communication tips and strategies (including how you can use the technology you already have at your fingertips to better communicate), as well as how to work with a sign language interpreter. The presenters for this workshop will be Neil McDevitt, Executive Director, DHCC and Tanya Sturgis, Education Coordinator, DHCC.

This DEAFMed lecture series is put together by Natalie Perlov, SKMC Class of 2025, as part of her Humanities Scholarly Inquiry project.

DeafMED: Deaf Education and Awareness for Health Professions Students Sessions

  • Wednesday, September 7, 5-7 p.m. – Important Milestones in American Deaf History
  • Wednesday, October 5, 5-7 p.m. – Medical Terminology in American Sign Language (ASL)
  • Wednesday, November 9, 5-7 p.m. – Deaf in the Arts

This event is hosted by the Gold Humanism Honor Society.

In GHHS's first speaker event of the year, we will be discussing the intersection of living with a chronic illness, working as a doctor, and being a patient. Our panelists include SKMC faculty and medical students who live with visible and invisible conditions: Dr. Courtney White, Dr. Jeanne Doherty, Dr. Jessica Fernandez, Michelle Schafer (MS3), and Taylor Houlihan (MS4). What did they learn along the way? What can our medical community do to better support them as healthcare providers? 

A panel discussion with Matthew Purinton, Ricardo Thornton, Britney Wilson and Nethra Ankam

The 2022 Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lecture presents a panel discussion with disability advocates and contributors to Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-First Century. One in four people in the United States lives with a self-reported disability. Too often people with disabilities experience stigma, discrimination and poor-quality services when accessing healthcare. This conversation will explore how disability is defined and experienced by diverse individuals and why attending to their perspectives is essential to the realization of equitable and inclusive care.

Moderated by Nethra Ankam, MD, JeffMD Wellness Thread Director and Associate Professor, Rehabilitation Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College. 

Sidney Kimmel Medical College is grateful to Mr. Edwin Berkowitz and his family for the generous donation that has established the Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lectureship. The Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lectureship will help engage Jefferson’s students and physicians on various areas in medical humanism, including topics that will enhance their compassion toward patients, improve their communication skills with patients, and allow for a better understanding about how to practice medicine with a patient-centered vision of delivering improved humanistic medical care.

Matthew CP Purinton, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of Pennsylvania. Matthew received his MSW from the University of Pennsylvania, where he specialized in studying organizational dynamics, PTSD, and brain-based psychotherapy. Matthew lectures in the Genetic Counseling program at Thomas Jefferson University and serves as a member of Jefferson Health’s Enterprise Patient and Family Centered Care program.

Ricardo Thornton is a strong self-advocate in the District of Columbia and a former resident of the district's institution for people with disabilities, Forest Haven. He is co-president of Project ACTION!, an advocacy coalition of adults with disabilities, is an ambassador with the Special Olympics, and served on the President's Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities. He has worked for more than 40 years at the Martin Luther King Jr Memorial Library.  He is married with one son and three grandchildren.  The film Profoundly Normal chronicles their life as one of the first couples in the United States with developmental disabilities to marry. 

Britney Wilson, JD is a civil rights attorney and writer from Brooklyn New York and is currently an Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Civil Rights and Disability Justice Clinic.  She received her BA from Howard University and her JD from the University of Pennsylvania Law School.  Her work has been featured in Longreads,and The Nation, on HBO’s Brave New Voices and the radio show and podcast, This American Life.

July 2022

Art for the Healer
Tuesdays, July 5-26, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Fleisher Art Memorial

Please note: This program is open to all Jefferson health professions students as a non-credit extracurricular activity; please only register for this program if you can commit to attending all of the sessions. if you are a Sidney Kimmel Medical College student, you have the option of completing this program for course credit for JMD 252: Humanities Selectives.

Our popular Art for the Healer program with Fleisher Art Memorial returns this summer, hosted on Fleisher's Bella Vista campus! Designed for Jefferson's health professions students, the program provides a four-week introduction to the visual principals and elements of art and design.

Informed by Bauhaus Vorkurs pedagogy and maintaining an emphasis on observation, the course introduces students to technical skills in different media while encouraging intuitive self-expression. Lessons are tailored to serve healthcare professionals particularly, encompassing goals of increasing empathy, strengthening crucial perceptual skills, and studying anatomical structures.

Course Outline - Classes will take place on Fleisher Art Memorial’s campus: 719 Catharine St, Philadelphia, PA 19147

July 5 - July 26, Tuesday evenings, 6:30-9:30 p.m. (4 evening sessions plus one visit to the Rodin Museum on a Friday or Saturday)

  • Tuesday, July 5, 6:30-9:30 p.m | Observation and Line
  • Tuesday, July 12, 6:30-9:30 p.m | The Body: Gesture & Proportion
  • Tuesday, July 19, 6:30-9:30 p.m | Visualizing Form
  • Tuesday, July 26, 6:30-9:30 p.m | Emotion Through Color
  • TBD: One Friday or Saturday trip to the Rodin Museum in Philadelphia (three hour session)

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format. 

Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD. 

June 2022

The Human Side of Healthcare with Dr. Don Friedman

In patient care, it is so easy to focus on the breadth of medical knowledge and the technology available today that we can easily ignore the human side of what we do as physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals when we interact with our patients. To examine this aspect of clinical care, these sessions will explore the humanity behind the practice of medicine from the patient perspective and from the healthcare professional perspective as well. The five sessions will focus on either different aspects of patient and practitioner interactions or the concept of self-care as a practice that can sustain us in our work and help find meaning in what we do.

There is no required reading and no commitment to all 5 sessions, but hopefully everyone interested will attend as many sessions as possible to gain a general perspective on this topic. Each 75 minute session will involve a 20-minute discussion at the beginning, 25-minute presentation, followed by a 30-minute discussion. The course is open to medical and nursing students and students in other allied health departments at Thomas Jefferson University.

The Human Side of Healthcare Series Overview 

Tuesdays, 5-6:15 p.m., May 31, June 7, 14, 21, & 28, Online via Zoom

  • Tuesday, May 31 – Mindful Self-Compassion
    What is it? How do you practice it? What are its benefits?
  • Tuesday, June 7 – Spirituality and Healthcare
    Why is spirituality an important part of patient care? How do you take a spiritual history?
  • Tuesday, June 14 – Characteristics of Effective Practitioners and a Discussion of the Differences Between Curing and Healing
    What approaches to patient interactions can be healing? How do we as healthcare providers establish meaningful relationships with patients, no matter what our field is. What role does skillful listening play in reaching this goal?
  • Tuesday, June 21  – Perfectionism, Shame, and the Inner Critic
    How do these factors, so rampant in healthcare, block us from our authentic selves, healthy achievement, and sustained growth? What are some antidotes to their negative effects?
  • Tuesday, June 28 – Medicine as Soul Work 
    How can medicine be soulful? How can what we do as healthcare professionals help us find meaning in our lives?

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Join us as panelists share how they have implemented gender affirming care into their practice. 

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format. 

Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD. 

2021-2022: Origins

May 2022

The Human Side of Healthcare with Dr. Don Friedman
Session 1: Mindful Self-Compassion

In patient care, it is so easy to focus on the breadth of medical knowledge and the technology available today that we can easily ignore the human side of what we do as physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals when we interact with our patients. To examine this aspect of clinical care, these sessions will explore the humanity behind the practice of medicine from the patient perspective and from the healthcare professional perspective as well. The five sessions will focus on either different aspects of patient and practitioner interactions or the concept of self-care as a practice that can sustain us in our work and help find meaning in what we do.

There is no required reading and no commitment to all five sessions, but hopefully everyone interested will attend as many sessions as possible to gain a general perspective on this topic. Each 75-minute session will involve a 20-minute discussion at the beginning, 25-minute presentation, followed by a 30-minute discussion. The course is open to medical and nursing students and students in other allied health departments at Thomas Jefferson University.

The Human Side of Healthcare Series Overview

Tuesdays, 5:00-6:15 p.m., May 31, June 7, 14, 21 & 28, Online via Zoom

  • Tuesday, May 31 – Mindful Self-Compassion
    What is it? How do you practice it? What are its benefits?
  • Tuesday, June 7 – Spirituality and Healthcare 
    Why is spirituality an important part of patient care? How do you take a spiritual history?
  • Tuesday, June 14 – Characteristics of Effective Practitioners and a Discussion of the Differences Between Curing and Healing 
    What approaches to patient interactions can be healing? How do we as healthcare providers establish meaningful relationships with patients, no matter what our field is. What role does skillful listening play in reaching this goal?
  • Tuesday, June 21 – Perfectionism, Shame, and the Inner Critic
    How do these factors, so rampant in healthcare, block us from our authentic selves, healthy achievement, and sustained growth? What are some antidotes to their negative effects?
  • Tuesday, June 28 – Medicine as Soul Work
    How can medicine be soulful? How can what we do as healthcare professionals help us find meaning in our lives?

Speakers Dr. Shruti Chandra, Charlotte Tatum, Dr. Debra Harder, Melissa Ash, and Nicole Cavaliere will share their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic as healthcare workers and administrators between movements of music, written by Ted Babcock and played by the Viano Quartet, shedding light on the humanity of healthcare workers and calling the public to action in reforming our healthcare systems as the pandemic fades from public perception.

April 2022

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Join us as our panelists discuss their personal stories about organ donation, the transplant process and interactions with healthcare teams.

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format. 

Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD. 

Join us for our culminating event to celebrate this year of the humanities! We will congratulate those who earned the Asano Humanities & Health Certificate and the contributors and editors of  Inside Out, Jefferson’s student-run arts & literary journal. Special guest Yolanda Wisher, Philadelphia-based poet, singer, educator, and curator, will present on the intersection of poetry and health and facilitate an interactive writing exercise. Then, hear students share excerpts of their written and artistic works from Inside Out’s newly-minted edition! We hope you come out for this in-person celebration to meet your fellow humanities peers, decompress, snack, and wrap up the year.  

In our last workshop of the season, participants will reflect on the past year and look ahead to what’s next while anchoring in the present moment. We will use art, movement, music and writing to mark this transition. Dinner provided to those in attendance.

Facilitated by Peggy Tileston, MT-BC and Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care Series
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by an arts therapist and music therapist, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion. 

Co-presented with the Student Counseling Center (SCC).

March 2022

About the film: Through shard-like glimpses of everyday life in post-Hurricane María Puerto Rico, Landfall is a cautionary tale for our times. Set against the backdrop of protests that toppled the US colony’s governor in 2019, the film offers a prismatic portrait of collective trauma and resistance. While the devastation of María attracted a great deal of media coverage, the world has paid far less attention to the storm that preceded it: a 72-billion-dollar debt crisis crippling Puerto Rico well before the winds and waters hit. Landfall examines the kinship of these two storms—one environmental, the other economic—juxtaposing competing utopian visions of recovery. Featuring intimate encounters with Puerto Ricans as well as the newcomers flooding the island, Landfall reflects on a question of contemporary global relevance: when the world falls apart, who do we become?

About the talkback: Join a dialogue between Lale Namerrow Pastor, Associate Producer and Collaborator of Landfall, and Richard V. Pepino, MSS, MS, Lecturer, Public Health, Jefferson College of Population Health, Thomas Jefferson University.

Presented by the Creativity Core Curriculum
(*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

The most dramatic form of creativity is the “Aha! Moment,”—what experimental psychologists and neuroscientists call “insight.” Insights are sudden realizations that pop into awareness, seemingly from nowhere. They are the source of new inventions, poems, symphonies, and mathematical theorems. They also provide practical solutions to everyday problems. Using examples from problem solving and musical improvisation, this talk will explain what an insight is, how the brain generates them, and how to have more of them. 

John KouniosPhD, is a professor in Drexel University’s Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences who has published research on insight, creativity, problem solving, memory, and Alzheimer’s disease, and coauthored (with Mark Beeman) the international Amazon Bestseller, The Eureka Factor: Aha Moments, Creative Insight, and the Brain (Random House). John's research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation and has been reported by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Times (London), and National Public Radio, and was featured in BBC Television and Discovery Science Channel documentaries. His work was profiled by The New Yorker and The Saturday Evening Post and is part of a permanent exhibit in Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry. He is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the Psychonomic Society, and the International Society for the Study of Creativity and Innovation.

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Join us for a Special Schwartz Center Rounds with Josh Robinson, Jefferson Humanities & Health Teaching Artist as he facilitates an interactive workshop teaching us how to use music and drumming as a coping tool, a vehicle for healthy expression/emotional release, and a fun way to connect with others in an authentic and engaging way.

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format. 

Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD. 

Reading: Marilisa C. Navarro, Radical Recipe: Veganism as Anti-Racism
Time: 18 min read

Special guest discussant: Marilisa C. Navarro, PhD, Assistant Professor of African American Studies, College of Humanities and Sciences, Thomas Jefferson University.

This week, HHRG will discuss anti-racism in relation to food, foodways, veganism and cookbooks. Special guest discussant Dr. Marilisa Navarro will join the group in considering how two cookbooks—Afro-Vegan by Bryant Terry and Decolonize Your Diet by Luz Calvo and Catriona Esquibel—go beyond conveying recipes to produce knowledge, critique racism and colonialism, deconstruct the white-centric veganism narrative, and highlight the voices, histories and experiences of people of color.

Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the selected reading. To access the reading and registration link, participants must visit the Health Humanities Reading Group: Radical Recipe page in the Event Links module of the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas. 

Jefferson Humanities Forum & College of Architecture and the Built Environment present

Amie Shao - Expecting More: Designing for Birth 

Amie Shao is a Principal with MASS Design Group, where she oversees research focusing on health infrastructure planning, design, and evaluation. Amie also leads the MASS.Made team in interior design, including space planning, testing and fabrication, and furniture design for office and healthcare spaces. Her work is aimed at engaging and empowering stakeholders in the design process; creating human-centered environments that are functional, adaptable, and mission-driven; supporting and substantiating the impact of design on health, social, and environmental outcomes; and translating research into guidelines that can be used to advocate for policy change.

Currently, Amie is supporting the firm’s COVID-19 research and leading Maternal Health projects with IHI and PATH in Africa and South Asia. Blending human-centered design practices with evidence-based research, Amie has collaborated with Ariadne Labs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to investigate the Impact of Design on Clinical Care in Childbirth, worked with the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital to design for the spatial needs of children with Cerebral Palsy, and coordinated the production of National Health Infrastructure Standards for the Liberian Ministry of Health.

Forum Scholar: Christopher Harnish, MArch, Associate Professor, College of Architecture and the Built Environment

Co-presented with the College of Architecture and the Built Environment.

During 2021-2022, the Jefferson Humanities Forum speaker series will bring a handful of multidisciplinary scholars and thinkers to investigate the theme Origins. Learn more on the Jefferson Humanities Forum page, where you can also explore the contextual resources for this lecture, compiled by Dr. Lazcano.

Reading: Reading: McMillen, Matt. (2021, April 8). Race-Norming in Health Care: A Special Report. HealthCentral.

Facilitator: Denine R. Crittendon, MPH, PhD(c), Lecturer, Jefferson College of Population Health

Join a discussion about the implications of “race-norming” and the movement to phase out race-based calculations in medical education and clinical settings. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the selected reading. 

Play reading: Nine Night by Natasha Gordon (England)

Relationships are tested and secrets revealed when a British-Jamaican family gathers for the customary nine nights of mourning following the death of their matriarch.

Inis Nua’s 2021-22 Reading Series: Healing and Hope presents three moving and funny plays that shine a light on how we as people find connection, community, and meaning even in the darkest of times.

In this virtual workshop, participants will explore a variety of practices that help to develop resiliency and well-being. Facilitated by Peggy Tileston, MT-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care series: In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by an arts therapist and music therapist, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion. 

Co-presented with the Student Counseling Center (SCC).

Presented by the Arlen Specter Center
(*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

A panel discussion on the psychological impact of the pandemic on college students, faculty and staff. Hear perspectives of students, an administrator, and a psychologist. Learn about dealing with uncertainty; positives/negatives of online learning; stress and anxiety due to isolation, changed living environments, and more.

Moderator: Evan Laine, MA, JD, Faculty Director, Arlen Specter Center; Director, Law & Society Program, Thomas Jefferson University – East Falls

Panelists:

  • Henry Humphreys, PhD, Vice-Chancellor, Dean of Students, Thomas Jefferson University – East Falls
  • C. Virginia O’Hayer, MA, PhD, Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Human Behavior Director, Thomas Jefferson University - Center City
  • Julia Smith, BA, Advanced Student, MS in Community & Trauma Counseling Program, Thomas Jefferson University – East Falls

Presented by the Arlen Spector Center as their Laurence Katz Memorial Lecture.

Explore the ways in which a drawing practice can bring balance to your healthcare studies or career. Artist and cardiologist Nazanin Moghbeli, MD, FACC, uses art to inspire, decompress, and deepen curiosity about the human body and medicine. Join Dr. Moghbeli for a workshop that will build on this wisdom to expand participants’ observational skills, promote self-care, and encourage burnout prevention. All drawing abilities and experiences are welcome! This workshop will discuss basic drawing techniques, composition, subject matter, three-dimensionality, and tips for forming a daily sketchbook practice.

Materials will be available for pick-up prior to the workshop, including: a small sketchbook and portable pocket version, drawing pencils, and an eraser.

About the instructor: Nazanin Moghbeli, MD, FACC is an Iranian-American artist and cardiologist, and the director of the Cardiac Care Unit at Einstein Medical Center. Dr. Moghbeli is the current Humanities Artist-in-Residence

February 2022

Jefferson Humanities Forum “Origins” Presents 

Robin Wall Kimmerer: Braiding Sweetgrass

Robin Wall Kimmerer is a mother, scientist, decorated professor, and enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She is the author of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants, which has earned Kimmerer wide acclaim. Her first book, Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses, was awarded the John Burroughs Medal for outstanding nature writing, and her other work has appeared in Orion, Whole Terrain, and numerous scientific journals. She tours widely and has been featured on NPR’s On Being with Krista Tippett and in 2015 addressed the general assembly of the United Nations on the topic of “Healing Our Relationship with Nature.” Kimmerer lives in Syracuse, New York, where she is a SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor of Environmental Biology, and the founder and director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, whose mission is to create programs which draw on the wisdom of both indigenous and scientific knowledge for our shared goals of sustainability.

Forum Scholar: Anne Bower, PhD, Professor of Biology, College of Life Sciences, Thomas Jefferson University.

Co-presented with the Jefferson College of Life Sciences.

During 2021-2022, the Jefferson Humanities Forum speaker series will bring a handful of multidisciplinary scholars and thinkers to investigate the theme Origins. Learn more on the Jefferson Humanities Forum page, where you can also explore the contextual resources for this lecture, compiled by Dr. Lazcano.

Join a discussion about poetry, illness, and healthcare, drawing from the poetry collection Little Pharma, by doctor and medical ethicist Laura Kolbe.

Reading: Cadaver 28 and Little Pharma’s Research, two poems by Laura Kolbe
Facilitator: Katherine Hubbard, MA, Teaching Instructor, JeffMD Humanities Selectives, Sidney Kimmel Medical College 

Please note: This discussion will take place in-person, in the Hamilton Building on Jefferson's Center City campus. Lunch gift card provided. Limited copies of Laura Kolbe's Little Pharma will be available for attendees after the discussion.

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts, and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty, and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session.

To access the reading, participants must visit the Health Humanities Reading Group module in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas. 

Reading: Brad N. Greenwood, Rachel R. Hardeman, Laura Huang and Aaron Sojourner, “Physician–patient racial concordance and disparities in birthing mortality for newborns,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2020) 117 (35): 21194-21200. 

Facilitator: Denine R. Crittendon, MPH, PhD(c), Lecturer, Jefferson College of Population Health

This small-group discussion will consider a 2020 paper that posits that newborn-physician racial concordance (the newborn and doctor have the same race) improves mortality rates for Black babies, especially during more challenging births and in hospital spaces where more Black newborns are delivered.

Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the selected reading. To access the reading, participants must visit the Anti-Racism in Health Focus page in the Event Links module of the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas. 

Join us the DEI journal club in the new year to discuss ableism, the intentional or unintentional discrimination and prejudices against disabled persons, and its place in academia. We will address readings from “How Ableism Contributed to Me Leaving Graduate School" and “We Need to Address Ableism in Science” in addition to excerpts from the book Life of the Mind Interrupted by Katie Rose Guest Pryal, JD, PhD. 

Readings:

This DEI Journal Club is a safe and accountable space for the community to come together monthly to engage in active discussion about relevant diversity topics that will challenge our current world views in order to increase inclusivity and equity in the life sciences and our respective communities (classrooms, labs, offices, etc.). 

Interested in getting involved with the journal club? Head to our Canvas site or email JCLSDEIJournalClub@jefferson.edu.

Join a small-group discussion to explore themes from Robin Wall Kimmerer’s acclaimed book Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants. This program takes place in anticipation of Robin Wall Kimmerer’s Jefferson Humanities Forum talk on February 28 and will be facilitated by third-year medical student Steven Bieser. Copies of Braiding Sweetgrass will be offered to participants after the discussion.

No reading is required to participate in this discussion, attendees are just encouraged to peruse the following prompts and bring any reactions/responses/questions to a fun and low-key small group session!:

  • What can plants and other organisms teach us about our own origins? Origins of our own evolution? Of our medicines? Of the way we share (or fail to share) resources with one another?
  • Do trees communicate? how? And what does it mean to "communicate"?
  • The intersections of plants and medicine go back millennia as humans have learned how to apply mixtures of extracts from Willow bark (Aspirin) to wounds and alleviate pain and reduce fevers as recorded by Sumerians and Egyptians, and then by great physicians from ancient Greece and Rome. And independently by Indigenous peoples of the Americas to alleviate toothache, headache, and arthritis!!ew
  • Digoxin from digitalis (foxglove plants) is used to treat heart failure today but used to be used for epilepsy and may have influenced some of Van Gogh’s most famous work: yellowish halos that illuminate his “Starry Night” painting are a recognized symptom of digoxin poisoning.
  • How have plants influenced your own life and how will they impact your future?

Presented by Diversity, Inclusion & Community Engagement at Jefferson (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Please join us to hear from Mr. Yusef Salaam and Mr. Raymond Santana who were both tried and convicted in the “Central Park jogger” case along with four other Black and Latinx young men. They are part of the Exonerated Five who spent between seven to 13 years behind bars for crimes they did not commit until their sentences were overturned in 2002. Since then, they have received a multi-million dollar settlement from the city of New York for its injustice and have been profiled in award-winning films, including The Central Park Five documentary from Ken Burns, Sarah Burns and David McMahon and most recently the Emmy award-winning Netflix limited series When They See Us, written and directed by Ava DuVernay.  

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Join us as our panelists and attendees share positive outcomes, moments of thanks, and stories that have impacted their work and personal lives during difficult times.

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format. 

Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD. 

How can we learn from failure on the journey towards growth? Join us for a presentation and discussion with clinical therapist Matthew Purinton, MSW, LCSW, whose approach to learning from failure draws on the principles and values of trauma-informed care and Disability culture. 

Matt utilizes the unique knowledge gleaned from his life experience: forty-four years of living with a disability, thirty-six years of which have been spent dealing with chronic pain. Matt's experience informs his practice as a client-centered therapist who helps people discover new coping skills and uncover hidden resources. In his keynote presentation, Matt will discuss finding insights and strengths in personal experiences of adversity as well as the necessity of collective networks of solidarity for addressing systemic social failures, including those brought about by ableism. 

From Matt: I believe in leveraging a multimodal, multidisciplinary design process that levels patient and provider to co-create solutions by leaning into the problem. My Disability has taught me that the best way over an obstacle is straight through. I’ll be focusing on how we're failing in the time of Covid, and how ableism and implicit bias are hampering our recovery. Chronic isolation, chronic threat and fatigue, and mixed messages are all harming our psyches and our ability to evaluate information. We need social media to be a cultivator of connection and collaboration instead of an orchestrator of outrage, now more than ever. How can we reimagine business, education, design, and medicine by adopting a "Nothing About Us Without Us" problem-solving process? Representation matters, or else we are doomed to continue to do the same things and expect different results. Collaborating and asking the people who are impacted about what they think the issues are, and where they think the solutions can be found, is the place to start. 

Following his talk, Matt will be in dialogue with moderator Nethra Ankam, MD, Wellness Thread Director and JeffMD Associate Professor, Rehabilitation Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, and attendees.

Presented by Jefferson Humanities & Health, Sidney Kimmel Medical College Graduate Medical Education, SKMC Wellness Thread and the Student Counseling Center.

This workshop is all about taking some time to relax! Participants will be guided through a series of exercises designed to bring peace and calm by connecting with the breath, body and creative spirit. Facilitated by Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care Series
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by an arts therapist and music therapist, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion. 

Co-presented with the Student Counseling Center (SCC)

Reading: “Eight Bites” in Machado, Carmen Maria. (2017). Her Body and Other Parties. Graywolf Press.
Time: 20 min read

Facilitator: Katherine Hubbard, MA, Teaching Instructor, JeffMD Humanities Selectives, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

This week, HHRG will use fiction to discuss nuances around health and bodies. The selected short story “Eight Bites” follows a narrator who elects to get bariatric surgery after her three sisters have undergone the procedure (and claim that it changed their lives), stirring up themes of body image, self-hate, and weight-loss culture.

Please note: This discussion will take place in-person, in the Hamilton Building on Jefferson's Center City campus. Lunch gift card provided. Limited copies of Carmen Maria Machado’s Her Body and Other Parties will be available for attendees after the discussion.

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session.

To access the reading, participants must visit the Health Humanities Reading Group module in the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas. 

Reading: Marie V. Plaisime, David J. Malebranche, Andrea L. Davis and Jennifer A. Taylor, “Healthcare Providers’ Formative Experiences with Race and Black Male Patients in Urban Hospital Environments,” Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities (2017) 4: 1120-1127. 

Facilitator: Denine R. Crittendon, MPH, PhD(c), Lecturer, Jefferson College of Population Health

How does the normalization of structural racism at systemic levels impact patient-clinician encounters? This discussion will focus on a recent study conducted with Philadelphia-area physicians, nurses and 3rd and 4th year medical students which explored how personal and professional experiences influence interactions with Black male patients.

Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the selected reading. To access the reading, participants must visit the Anti-Racism in Health Focus page in the Event Links module of the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas. 

Please note: This discussion will take place in-person, in the Hamilton Building on Jefferson's Center City campus. Please only register if you are able to join in-person. Lunch gift card provided.

We all have a soundtrack that marks the many chapters of our lives. Teaching artist Josh Robinson and members from Jefferson student group JeffHELP CHATT will facilitate a reflection through your musical past, your stories, and the role music has played throughout your life. The workshop uses music as a vehicle to help participants connect to others and reconnect to themselves. Participants will be guided to reflect on the meaning of various songs in their lives and how music has helped them through both positive and negative experiences. 

Co-presented by Jefferson Humanities & Health and JeffHELP CHATT.

JeffHELP CHATT is a program designed by students for students at Thomas Jefferson University to promote mental health awareness and discussion about mental health. CHATT members are trained to serve as peer listeners for Jeff students who would like to talk about current concerns. Additionally, CHATT members work together and with staff to organize campus-wide social events that promote wellness. 

Presented by Jefferson's Global Health Student Consortium (*This is not our event, e are just spreading the word!*)

Jefferson’s Global Health Student Consortium (GHSC) presents the 2022 Global Health Conference which consists of three panels exploring different aspects of innovation, policy, and life amidst COVID, exploring inequity as well as highlighting successes in this daunting pandemic. With experts from various fields and countries such as Malawi, Japan, and Panama, we hope to reflect on how nations across the globe have dealt with seemingly insurmountable challenges posed by the pandemic and how that can inform our lives as we adjust to living with COVID-19.

To enter our raffle for 10 $50 Amazon gift cards, please register for the conference and show up this Friday!

12-1 p.m. - Panel 1: The Vaccine

  • Rwanda: Dr. Albert Tuyishime – Head of the Institute of HIV/AIDS
  • Washington DC: Mr. Zin Rizvi – Research Director, Public Citizen
  • Philadelphia: Dr. Matthias Schnell – Director, Jefferson Vaccine Center

1-2 p.m. - Panel 2: Grassroots Response

  • Panama: Christina Salazar, Carolina Cuenca – TodoPanama & Unidos por Panama
  • Philadelphia: Dr. Morgan Hutchinson – Jefferson Health Design Lab
  • India: Dr. Raja Narayanan – Director, LV Prasad Eye Institute and Pranav Adhyapak & Sushmita Kavatagimath – KLE medical students 

2-3 p.m. - Panel 3: Large-scale Response

  • Malawi: Dr. John Phuka – Head of Malawi’s Presidential Covid Taskforce
  • Japan: Dr. Jumpei Tsukada – Jefferson Japan Center
  • Italy: Dr. Ignazio Marino – Director, Jefferson Italy Center 

Learn more about the Global Health Student Consortium

To access the registration link, participants must visit the JeffX 2020 page in the Event Links module of the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas.

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Join us as our panelists share their perspective and coping with the constant and continued impact COVID has had on the healthcare system.

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format. 

Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD. 

To access the registration link, participants must visit the Schwartz Rounds page in the Event Links module of the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas. 

January 2022

Reading: William Carlos Williams, “The Use of Force,” first published in 1938, from The Doctor Stories (New York: New Directions, 1984).

Facilitator: Katherine Hubbard, MA, Teaching Instructor, JeffMD Humanities  electives, Sidney Kimmel Medical College 

Join a small group discussion about the short text “The Use of Force” by poet and physician William Carlos Williams. The story focuses on the interaction between a doctor and a determined child patient, giving insight into the doctor’s perspective as he navigates a stubborn patient and her potential life-threatening illness, and his own judgment.

The Health Humanities Reading Group gathers to think critically about health as it is understood through various disciplinary perspectives, social contexts and value systems. This ongoing program is open to students, faculty and staff, and offers an informal learning environment facilitated by participants. Participants are expected to read, and come prepared to discuss, the text selected for each session.

Presented by SORT (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Jefferson student group Student Opioid Response Team (SORT) presents a virtual panel featuring certified recovery specialists and patients from Project HOME Health Services’ (the Hub of Hope and Stephen Klein Wellness Center) Medication for Opioid Use Disorder (MOUD) Program to offer personal insight into the world of addiction and the road to recovery.

To access the Zoom link, participants must visit the SORT Virtual Panel page in the Event Links module of the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas. 

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Humor lightens your burdens, inspires hope, connects you to others, and keeps you grounded, focused, and alert. It also helps you release anger and forgive sooner. Join Caroline Rhoads, MSW, for this special sessions designed to help provide you with some much need respite from the world! 

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format. 

Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD. 

DocNights, the Jefferson Humanities & Health collaboration with Philadelphia Film Society, continues this fall with a new programming focus: environmental justice. 

About the film: Inhabitants follows five Native American Tribes across deserts, coastlines, forests, and prairies as they restore their traditional land management practices. For millennia Native Americans successfully stewarded and shaped their landscapes, but centuries of colonization have disrupted their ability to maintain traditional land management practices. As the climate crisis escalates these time-tested practices of North America's original inhabitants are becoming increasingly essential in a rapidly changing world.

About the Talkback
Join a virtual talkback with members of the Inhabitants community: Ben-Alex Dupris, producer; Costa Boutsikaris, co-director; Anna Palmer, co-director; and Michael Johnson, a traditional Hopi farmer and practitioner featured in the film. The discussion will be moderated by Susan Frostén, M.Arch, RA (NYS), LEED AP, Associate Provost for Academic Affairs, Associate Professor of Architecture, College of Architecture and the Built Environment, Thomas Jefferson University. 

View the Film
Inhabitants is available to view for free through January 31, 2022

Research has shown that our relationships with ourselves, others, and even nature have a profound impact on physical health and psychological well-being. In this workshop, we will use a variety of art-based practices to explore ways of building and maintaining this all-important sense of connection.  Facilitated by Peggy Tileston, MT-BC and Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care series
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by an arts therapist and music therapist, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion. 

Co-presented with the Student Counseling Center (SCC).

Drum It Out with Josh Robinson

Percussionist and Humanities visiting instructor Josh Robinson invites you to "Drum It Out!" This interactive workshop uses drumming as a coping tool, a vehicle for healthy expression and emotional release, and a fun way to connect with others in an authentic and engaging way. A pair of drumsticks will be available for pick-up leading up to the workshop. Alternatively, participants can use found objects such as wooden spoons, dowels to make noise on buckets or trash bins.

About the facilitator: Josh Robinson is a professional percussionist, teaching artist, and drum facilitator. He has been a visiting instructor in the Humanities at Thomas Jefferson University for the past four years and the former Humanities Artist-in-Residence. For the past 19 years, Josh has used his skills, expertise, and life experience to share drumming and the many gifts it brings with thousands of people each year around the country. 

Presented by the Student Counseling Center (SCC)
(*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Art therapy is often used as a healing intervention and as a way to foster creativity. With MLK Day approaching, let's join together and engage in an art exercise that will challenge you to consider how to embrace diversity and increase opportunities for peace. Start your community service early by spreading messages of hope, respect and incclusion. You do not need an artistic background to attend. Everyone is welcome. 

Facilitated by Dr. Shawn Blue, Psychologist, SCC

Art supplies to have on hand:

  • Piece of paper, any size, but at least 8.5x11" (optional: canvas or art journal)
  • Colored pencils, markers, paint

Presented by the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine Grand Rounds

(*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Educational Objectives
At the conclusion of the activity, the participant will be able to:

  • To learn more about the history of the Disability Rights Movement
  • To emphasize the ways in which the medical community can proactively help people adapt to their own disabilities
  • To appreciate the importance of listening to the patient

December 2021

Second-year medical student Sarah Muche and Humanities Education Coordinator Marcie Mamura are collaborating to offer a Creative Card Making Workshop! Drop on by anytime during the two-hour window for an opportunity to connect before dispersing for winter break and a chance to dedicate creative time to make a card for yourself or someone special. Materials and light snacks provided.

Presented by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*).

Behind every work of figurative art there is a model whose own artistic skills were essential in that work's creation. However, despite being visible as the subjects of these works, life models are nearly always overlooked in their role as active agents in the artistic process, and are seen instead as "mercenary drawing instruments." 

More Than Life Drawing will feature 90 minutes of drawing time with live, discussion-style interviews with participating figure models. These sessions will showcase not only the stories of the figure models who inspire us, but will also position the practice of life modeling as active, artistic, and activistic.

Bring your charcoal, pencils, and paint and join us for a lively night of drawing, learning, and fun!

The Eakins Writers’ Council is proud to invite you to a reading to celebrate the winners of the inaugural Drs. Theresa and Charles Yeo Writing Prize! This event will feature keynote speaker Jim Macmillan, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist, educator, and director of the Philadelphia Center for Gun Violence Reporting.

Yeo Writing Prize Winners

  • June by David Peters (Resident, Family and Community Medicine)
  • The Elevator Crisis by Ellen Solomon (Medical Student)
  • Being a Black Nurse During Two Pandemics: A Test of Faith by Chanel Hart (Nurse, Family and Community Medicine)

In addition to the above readings and speaker, we look forward to releasing the latest issue of the literary journal Evanescent. Many of the essays submitted for the prize are included in this issue of Evanescent, and all entries will be included in an actual time capsule to be placed in the foundation of the new Jefferson Specialty Care Pavilion at the corner of 11th and Chestnut, as well as in the Jefferson Archives in Scott Memorial Library. The essays will give a window into what it was like to live through 2020 for decades – if not centuries – to come.

Art Therapy is often used as a healing intervention and as a way to foster creativity. Attend Addressing Racial Trauma Through Art and learn about racial trauma and how it impacts us, and participate in an artistic method of expression of your diverse self. Engage in an art exercise that will help you explore your experience of the racial and ethnic violence occurring in our world and in our communities. 

Art supplies to have on hand:

  • A piece of paper, any size, but at least 8.5 x 11 or a canvas or art journal.
  • Colored pencils, markers, paint.
  • Optional: Magazine, scissors, glue stick.

Facilitated by: Dr. Shawn Blue, Staff Psychologist, Student Counseling Center.

Co-presented by the Student Counseling Center and Jefferson Humanities & Health. 

Where, when, and how did life on Earth begin? Join us for a conversation with Antonio Lazcano, PhD, that looks back on his more than 35 years of research into the origin and early evolution of life, and surveys recent developments in the field. Dr. Lazcano will be in conversation with Isidore Rigoutsos, PhD, Richard W. Hevner Professor in Computational Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University.

Dr. Lazcano is a Mexican biology researcher and professor of the School of Sciences at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in Mexico City. He pursued his undergraduate and graduate studies at UNAM, where he focused on the study of prebiotic evolution and the emergence of life. Dr. Lazcano's professional work has taken him internationally – he has been professor-in-residence or visiting scientist in France, Spain, Cuba, Switzerland, Russia, and the United States. He has written several books in Spanish, including the bestseller, The Origin of Life (1984). Dr. Lazcano has also been a member of several advisory and review boards of scientific organizations, such as the NASA Astrobiology Institute. He served as president of the International Society for the Study of the Origin of Life (ISSOL) for two terms, and is the first Latin American scientist to occupy this position. Dr. Lazcano is committed to promoting scientific journalism, teaching, and the study of the origins of life all over the globe.

During 2021-2022, the Jefferson Humanities Forum speaker series will bring a handful of multidisciplinary scholars and thinkers to investigate the theme Origins. Learn more on the Jefferson Humanities Forum page, where you can also explore the contextual resources for this lecture, compiled by Dr. Lazcano.

No One Dies Alone (NODA) at Thomas Jefferson University will be hosting Nurse Michelle Lasota and Dr. Kathleen G. Mechler to answer questions regarding end of life care and share their experiences working in palliative and hospice care. Join us for an insightful conversation between two inspiring individuals who are widely recognized for their holistic approach in healthcare. Lunch will be provided!

About NODA
No One Dies Alone (NODA) is an interprofessional volunteering organization. Our mission is to provide compassionate companionship for patients at Jefferson hospitals who would otherwise be alone during their final moments of life. Moreover, our service provides benefits to the nurses, friends, and family members who find comfort in knowing that their patient or loved one is not alone during this time. After nurses have determined a need for our services, volunteers, if available, can sign up in shifts of self-assigned length to be at the bedside of the patient. During our time at the bedside, we offer our supportive presence by reading books or poetry, playing music, and/or simply sitting with the patient. Volunteers receive training and are welcome to our regular seminars covering end-of-life care and related topics. We hold group meetings to discuss experiences and support each other. We welcome anyone in the Jefferson community to join our organization. There are no dues or fees required. Questions? Reach out to noda@students.jefferson.edu.

In this in-person arts-based workshop, participants will explore ways to find light in the darkness, become more comfortable with discomfort, and seek support. Facilitated by Peggy Tileston, MT-BC, and Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care Series
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by an arts therapist and music therapist, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance, and develop self-compassion. 

Co-presented with the Student Counseling Center (SCC).

Presented by the Expressive Media Collection Film Library
(*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*).

Join a virtual screening of Art Therapy: The Movie, a documentary that follows practitioners doing art therapy in different ways and with different communities, all around the globe. After the screening, a panel of special guests, including Jefferson's own Rachel Brandoff, PhD, ATR-BC, ATCS, LCAT, an assistant professor and coordinator of the Art Therapy Concentration in Community and Trauma Counseling, will discuss the film and their relationships to art therapy.

About the Film
Art Therapy: The Movie is an overview of the field of art therapy through definitions and examples of what art therapy means to different practitioners and patients in a wide variety of settings. The film explores diverse ways of thinking about and doing art therapy. It shows professionals working with various populations in the United States and in other parts of the world. Art therapists and clients discuss their understanding and relationship with art therapy, the art, and the artist. Work with individuals and groups is demonstrated, sharing stories of the creative process in both personal and communal healing. These vivid tales remind us of the power and privilege of our creative voices and their potential to bridge divides, whether naturally occurring or created by human beings.

November 2021

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*).

Please join us as we reflect back on 2021 and share inspiring messages, stories and moments of gratefulness for one another! 

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz, who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format. 

Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C, and Kathleen Mechler, MD. 

Soundtrack to Your Life with Josh Robinson & JeffHELP CHATT

We all have a soundtrack that marks the many chapters of our lives. Teaching artist Josh Robinson and members from Jefferson student group JeffHELP CHATT will facilitate a reflection through your musical past, your stories, and the role music has played throughout your life. The workshop uses music as a vehicle to help participants connect to others and reconnect to themselves. Participants will be guided to reflect on the meaning of various songs in their lives and how music has helped them through both positive and negative experiences.

Co-presented by Jefferson Humanities & Health and JeffHELP CHATT.

JeffHELP CHATT is a program designed by students for students at Thomas Jefferson University to promote mental health awareness and discussion about mental health. CHATT members are trained to serve as peer listeners for Jeff students who would like to talk about current concerns. Additionally, CHATT members work together and with staff to organize campus-wide social events that promote wellness.

Presented by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*).

Behind every work of figurative art there is a model whose own artistic skills were essential in that work's creation. However, despite being visible as the subjects of these works, life models are nearly always overlooked in their role as active agents in the artistic process, and are seen instead as "mercenary drawing instruments." 

More Than Life Drawing will feature 90 minutes of drawing time with live, discussion-style interviews with participating figure models. These sessions will showcase not only the stories of the figure models who inspire us, but will also position the practice of life modeling as active, artistic, and activistic.

Bring your charcoal, pencils, and paint and join us for a lively night of drawing, learning, and fun!

DocNights, the Jefferson Humanities & Health collaboration with the Philadelphia Film Society, continues this fall with a new programming focus: environmental justice. Join us for our second film screening and talkback, featuring the documentary Gather.

About the Film
Gather is an intimate portrait of the growing movement amongst Native Americans to reclaim their spiritual, political, and cultural identities through food sovereignty, while battling the trauma of centuries of genocide.

Gather follows Nephi Craig, a chef from the White Mountain Apache Nation (Arizona), opening an indigenous café as a nutritional recovery clinic; Elsie Dubray, a young scientist from the Cheyenne River Sioux Nation (South Dakota), conducting landmark studies on bison; and the Ancestral Guard, a group of environmental activists from the Yurok Nation (Northern California), trying to save the Klamath river.

About the Talkback
Following the screening, Twila Cassadore and Nephi Craig, two people featured in the documentary, will join us via Zoom for a film talkback, moderated by Rabiya Bower, MHSc, RD, LDN, Coordinator, MS in Nutrition & Dietetic Practice Program, Teaching Instructor, Jefferson College of Health Professions, Thomas Jefferson University.

In this virtual workshop, participants will be invited to engage in a variety of practices designed to lower stress and anxiety. Facilitated by Peggy Tileston, MT-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care Series
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by an arts therapist and music therapist, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance, and develop self-compassion. 

Co-presented with the Student Counseling Center (SCC).

Join the opening night for Autopilot, an exhibition of sculptural and poetic reflections by second year medical student Sarah Muche. The works tell a story from Sarah's time at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. Amidst fluctuating mental health, sculpture gave the artist a vehicle to explore her vulnerability. The exhibit will be on display through November 29.

Explore the ways in which a drawing practice can bring balance to your healthcare studies or career. Artist and cardiologist Nazanin Moghbeli, MD, FACC, uses art to inspire, decompress, and deepen curiosity about the human body and medicine. Join Dr. Moghbeli for a workshop that will build on this wisdom to expand participants’ observational skills, promote self-care, and encourage burnout prevention. All drawing abilities and experiences are welcome! This workshop will discuss basic drawing techniques, composition, subject matter, three-dimensionality, and tips for forming a daily sketchbook practice.

Materials will be available for pick-up prior to the workshop, including: a small sketchbook and portable pocket version, drawing pencils, and eraser.

About the instructor: Nazanin Moghbeli, MD, FACC, is an Iranian-American artist and cardiologist, and the director of the Cardiac Care Unit at Einstein Medical Center. Dr. Moghbeli is the current Humanities Artist-in-Residence. 

Play reading: For Once by Tim Price (Wales).

Teenage Sid and his parents struggle to navigate their new reality when an accident shatters their peaceful lives in a sleepy rural village.

Inis Nua’s 2021-22 Reading Series: Healing and Hope presents three moving and funny plays that shine a light on how we as people find connection, community, and meaning even in the darkest of times.

Akhil Reed Amar – Three Slices of Jefferson: 1776, 1801, and 1826

Akhil Reed Amar, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale University, joins the Jefferson Humanities Forum to explore three critical moments in the life of Thomas Jefferson, based on excerpts from his new book The Words That Made Us: America’s Constitutional Conversation, 1760-1840. Professor Amar teaches constitutional law in both Yale College and Yale Law School. After graduating from Yale College, summa cum laude, in 1980, and from Yale Law School in 1984, and clerking for then Judge (now Justice) Stephen Breyer, Amar joined the Yale faculty in 1985 at the age of 26. He is the author of more than a hundred law review articles and several books, most notably The Bill of Rights (1998, winner of the Yale University Press Governors’ Award), America’s Constitution (2005, winner of the ABA’s Silver Gavel Award), America’s Unwritten Constitution (2012, named one of the year’s 100 best nonfiction books by The Washington Post), and The Constitution Today (2016, named one of the year’s top ten nonfiction books by Time magazine).

Forum Scholar: Evan Laine, JD, MA, Director, Associate Professor, Law & Society Program, College of Humanities & Sciences and Faculty Director, Arlen Specter Center.

New this year, each Forum event will have an accompanying Forum Scholar, a Jefferson faculty member with a relevant focus of academic inquiry, who will generate resources to contextualize and complement the Forum speaker. Explore the contextual resources compiled by Professor Evan Laine on the Jefferson Humanities Forum page.

This event is co-sponsored by Jefferson Humanities & Health and the College of Humanities & Sciences as part of their Dietrich V. Asten Lecture Series.

During 2021-2022, the Jefferson Humanities Forum speaker series will bring a handful of multidisciplinary scholars and thinkers to investigate the theme Origins. 

Please note: This in-person event is open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff. The event will also be live-streamed as a Zoom webinar open to all Jefferson students, faculty and staff, and public viewers. When you register through Eventbrite, Jefferson community members can choose an "in-person" or "livestream" ticket, while members of the public can reserve a "livestream" ticket. All registrants will receive the Zoom link for the livestream, regardless of what option you indicate.

October 2021

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*).

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz, who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution, they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format. 

Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C, and Kathleen Mechler, MD. 

Over the past year and a half, many of us have become more aware of the manifestations and impact of racism in our society. We have struggled to begin to dismantle and transform the systems that uphold racism, which can feel overwhelming, angering, and painful. During the Story Slam, Jefferson faculty, students, and alumni will share five-minute stories exploring the theme “A Step Forward: Moving From Awareness to Anti-Racism in Healthcare” and help us consider how we can create change and move forward during a time of growing attention to racism and disparities; stand with each other for social justice and health equity; and ultimately, care for our patients, our communities, our families, and ourselves. Following the stories, attendees will be invited to join brief small group discussions and share reflections and goals for the future.

Featured Storytellers

  • Renea Berry, BSN, RN, Nurse Clinical Coordinator, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Family and Community Medicine, Jefferson Family Medicine Associates
  • Iris Burns, MPH, OTD, Class of ’22, Jefferson College of Rehabilitation Sciences
  • Steven Herrine, MD, Professor of Medicine, Vice Dean, Academic Affairs and Undergraduate Medical Education, Sidney Kimmel Medical College
  • Amber E. King, PharmD, BCPS, FNAP, Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Jefferson College of Pharmacy
  • Ana Maria Lopez, MD, MPH, MACP, FRCP, Professor and Vice Chair, Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Chief of Cancer Services, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center
  • Danielle Snyderman, MD, CMD, Associate Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine

Moderated by Nethra Ankam, MD, JeffMD Wellness Thread Director, Associate Professor, Rehabilitation Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College.

Co-presented by Jefferson Humanities & Health, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, and the Jefferson Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education (JCIPE).

In this virtual workshop, we will use writing and art in the service of self-expression and empathic connection. Facilitated by Sondra Rosenberg, ATR-BC.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care Series

In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by an arts therapist and music therapist, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance, and develop self-compassion. 

Co-presented with the Student Counseling Center (SCC). Pre-registration required. 

Tune in for the Experience, Art & Health panel, part of the 2nd Annual International Neurodiversity & the Built Environment Symposium, featuring the following presentations, and a discussion between all the panel participants: 

  • Art and Health Interventions – Transferring Mediated Aesthetic Experiences From the Gallery/Museum to Healthcare - Lyn Godley & Anita Kocsis
  • Art Therapy for the Neurodiverse - Rachel Brandoff & Reina Lombardi
  • The Grey Area Between Autism and Immersive Environments - Autisarian Network, Lonnie Smith

About the International Neurodiversity & the Built Environment Symposium: Immersive Experiences

Building upon last year's inaugural Neurodiversity Symposium, this year’s dialogue focuses on immersive experiences, responsive environments, spatial interactions, and experimental evaluative and physiological measuring tools and criteria. It also includes advocacy, spatial and social guidelines, and bottom-up and organic initiatves. 

These serial events are intensely cross-disciplinary and aim toward critical interactions addressing all-inclusive ways for inhabiting and perceiving our environments. They aim to stimulate international dialogue amongst designers, artists, medical field experts, tech companies, educational institutions, self-advocates, and caregivers.

This event is organized by Severino Alfonso and Loukia Tsafoulia as part of the Synesthetic Research and Design Lab, along with Dr. Wendy Ross and Sabra Townsend from the Center for Autism and Neurodiversity, Jefferson Health. 

Open to Jefferson students, faculty, and staff.

 Join a DEI Journal Club discussion, facilitated by JCLS graduate students, exploring themes surrounding representation in STEM through excerpts from Yaa Gyasi’s newest novel, Transcendent Kingdom. Reading of the provided sample chapter (Chapter 14) is encouraged but not necessary to attend or participate!

Access the audiobook

About the DEI Journal Club

The DEI Journal Club is a safe and accountable space for the community to come together monthly to engage in active discussion about relevant diversity topics that challenge our current worldviews, in order to increase inclusivity, equity, and belonging in the life sciences and our respective communities (classrooms, labs, offices, etc.).

Questions? Or want to get involved? Contact JCLSDEIJournalClub.

Yaa Gyasi is the author of Homegoing, one of the most celebrated debuts of 2016. A riveting, kaleidoscopic novel, Homegoing is a story of race, history, ancestry, love, and time that traces the descendants of two sisters torn apart in eighteenth-century Africa across three hundred years in Ghana and America. Her follow-up novel, Transcendent Kingdom, is a raw and intimate novel about a Ghanaian family in Alabama that layers themes of loss, mental illness, and representation in STEM fields – challenging our notions of who or what a scientist is, and how they might look or think. Born in Ghana and raised in Huntsville, Alabama, Gyasi is a graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop and lives in Berkeley, California. She is the winner of the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize, the PEN/Hemingway Award for Best First Novel, and was a finalist for the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Fiction and the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize.

Forum Scholar: Marcella McCoy-Deh, PhD, Associate Professor, College of Humanities and Sciences, Director, Philadelphia University Honors Institute at Thomas Jefferson University. 

New this year, each Forum event will have an accompanying Forum Scholar, a Jefferson faculty member with a relevant focus of academic inquiry, who will generate resources to contextualize and complement the Forum speaker. Explore the contextual resources compiled by Dr. McCoy-Deh on the Jefferson Humanities Forum page.

Co-presented with the Philadelphia University Honors Institute at Thomas Jefferson University.

During 2021-2022, the Jefferson Humanities Forum speaker series will bring a handful of multidisciplinary scholars and thinkers to investigate the theme Origins.

Join us for a panel discussion exploring the Well, What Were You Wearing? exhibit, victim-blaming, and supporting survivors of sexual assault.

The panel will be joined by:

  • Kat Cambareri, MPH, Jefferson College of Population Health, Class of 2019
  • Steve DiDonato, PhD, Associate Professor, Jefferson College of Nursing, Co-director, Jefferson Trauma Education Network
  • Monique Howard, EdD, MPH, Senior Director of Women’s Health Initiatives, Center for Global Women’s Health, School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania
  • Susan Sorenson, PhD, Director, Ortner Center on Violence & Abuse
  • Katie Vodzak, JD, Title IX Coordinator, Thomas Jefferson University

Moderated by Rosie Frasso, PhD, Director, Master of Public Health Program, Jefferson College of Population Health, Thomas Jefferson University.

About the Exhibit
Jefferson Humanities & Health is partnering with the Jefferson College of Population Health to present Well, What Were You Wearing? This exhibition of photos by MPH graduate Kat Cambareri explores victim-blaming and sexual assault. Cambareri’s ongoing project has been featured in Time magazine and HuffPost. The exhibit is on display for Jefferson students, faculty, and staff in Eakins Lounge: Monday, October 4 & Tuesday, October 5, 11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., and Wednesday, October 6 & Thursday, October 7, 12:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Attendees will be invited to share anonymous reflections on the work.

About the Panelists
Kat Cambareri, MPH, is a JCPH graduate living and working in Philadelphia. She currently works as a clinical research coordinator and is enjoying working on clinical trials in the pediatric population. Outside of work, she spends time with friends and family, and loves cooking, creating art, hiking, and exploring Philly.

Stephen DiDonato, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Jefferson College of Nursing and the co-Director of the Jefferson Trauma Education Network (J-TEN) at Thomas Jefferson University. He holds his Master’s Degree in Counseling from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, and his PhD in International Psychology from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Dr. DiDonato has extensive experience in training and consulting with behavioral health and medical departments, to enhance the health and vibrancy of the workforce. Dr. DiDonato’s clinical expertise is working with children, families, and communities who have been exposed to potentially traumatic events, with a primary focus on child sexual abuse victims. Dr. DiDonato’s research is primarily focused on how providers and students adherence to myths, implicit stereotypes, and restricted stereotypes influence engagement with clients/patients and families. Dr. DiDonato also focuses his scholarly inquiry on program evaluation (higher education and training models).

Monique Howard, EdD, MPH, is the Senior Director of Women’s Health Initiatives at Penn Nursing’s Center for Global Women’s Health (CGWH). Dr. Howard has been a public health practitioner with a focus on women’s health for over 25 years. She has led a statewide female-specific AIDS service organization in New Jersey, a maternal and child health organization in Chester County, Pennsylvania, the New Jersey Department of Women’s Health, and most recently, WOAR, Philadelphia’s only rape crisis center (formerly known as Women Organized Against Rape). Dr. Howard is a thought leader on issues that impact women and communities. Throughout her career, Dr. Howard has advocated for consumers and service providers and promoted systems to increase access and quality of care for women. She is committed to providing programming and services that increase the health and well-being of women and their families.

Susan B. Sorenson, PhD, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, has devoted her career to the topic of violence against women. She was part of the research team that first documented that the person most likely to sexually assault a woman is a man she knows, often one she cares about. Sorenson, with over 150 publications to her credit, taught the first violence prevention course in a school of public health in the nation. Her most recent work, After Campus Sexual Assault: A Guide for Parents (Rowman & Littlefield, 2021), is a book for students as they are deciding whether and what to tell a parent about having been assaulted, parents who have received the news, helpers (therapists, campus staff members, etc.), and parents who are all-in on preparing themselves for their daughter going off to college.

Katie Colgan Vodzak, JD, is the Title IX Coordinator for Thomas Jefferson University. Her focus across Jefferson is educating our community about sex and gender-based misconduct, providing information, resources, and options to those affected, and coordinating institutional response to these types of incidents to address the concerns and prevent their recurrence. Prior to joining Jefferson, Ms. Vodzak served in a similar role as Director of Equal Opportunity and Title IX Compliance at Drexel University, and previously spent a number of years investigating and prosecuting sexual assaults, intimate partner violence, child abuse, and human trafficking. Ms. Vodzak more recently served as a co-chair of the PA Office of Attorney General’s working group on Campus Sexual Assault and has trained numerous Title IX investigators in the region on conducting trauma-informed investigations.

Moderator
Rosemary (Rosie) Frasso, PhD, is the director of the Master of Public Health program, and a professor in Jefferson's College of Population Health. Her expertise in qualitative methods focuses on traditional and alternative data sources and data collection approaches, including, but not limited to, arts informed research, walking interviews, photo-elicitation, and consensus-deriving group approaches. Her recent work focuses on the intersection of art and research as a tool for advocacy and education.

Join a conversation with Deirdre Cooper Owens, PhD, the Charles & Linda Wilson Professor in the History of Medicine and Director of the Humanities in Medicine Program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and Director of the Program in African American History at The Library Company of Philadelphia. Professor Cooper Owens is the author of Medical Bondage: Race, Gender and the Origins of American Gynecology (University of Georgia Press, 2018). In her book, she investigates the relationship between chattel slavery and modern gynecology in the U.S., retelling the stories of Black enslaved women and Irish immigrant women whose lives were shaped by exploitative medical research. Professor Cooper Owens highlights the role of structural racism in the achievements of pioneering American doctors, including James Marion Sims, who received a medical degree from Jefferson Medical College in 1835. 

Materials
Discussion group participants are asked to watch Prof. Cooper Owens’ recorded lecture in advance (Total length: 1 hour to view recorded lecture; begin at approximately 8 minutes after introductions, and end at 1 hour 07 minutes).

  • Watch: Deirdre Cooper Owens, PhD, on Medical Bondage: Race, Gender and the Origins of American Gynecology at UC Berkeley on Feb. 21, 2020. 
  • Optional Reading: Read Chapter 1 of Medical Bondage, available on Canvas. To access the reading, visit the Anti-Racism and Racial Justice Resources page in the DEI Resources Module in the Jefferson Humanities Health Canvas page. Instructions to access Canvas below.

To access the registration link, participants must visit the Anti-Racism in Health Focus Discussion: Medical Bondage page in the Event Links module of the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas.

Presented by Diversity, Inclusion & Community Engagement at Jefferson (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*).

Filmmaker Joel Leso and researcher Connie Watson, PhD, will help attendees explore the impact our biases have and teach the skills needed to disrupt them so that we can be more inclusive.

Objectives:

  1. Understand what unconscious bias is.
  2. Explore the impact our biases have on own lives and the people around us – even if they’re outside our conscious awareness.
  3. Learn skills to disrupt our biases so that we can be more inclusive.

“Let’s Talk” is a Diversity & Inclusion workshop series that opens the opportunity for conversation on any D&I topic. Each workshop is designed to address the educational and awareness needs of the Jefferson Enterprise in regards to topics such as unconscious bias, systemic racism, race in America, LGBTQ competence, gender bias, health equity, and much more.

To access the registration link, participants must visit the Let's Talk page in the Event Links module of the Jefferson Humanities & Health organization on Canvas. 

Jefferson Humanities & Health is partnering with the Jefferson College of Population Health to present Well, What Were You Wearing?, an exhibition of photos by MPH graduate Kat Cambareri, exploring victim-blaming and sexual assault. Cambareri’s ongoing project has been featured in Time magazine and HuffPost. Attendees will be invited to share anonymous reflections on the work.

Panel Discussion
On Wednesday, October 6, 6:00 p.m., join a virtual panel discussion exploring the Well, What Were You Wearing? exhibit and the themes it raises with the artist, experts in the field, and researchers. The panel discussion is free and open to the public.

Reading/Listening:

This week, the Health Humanities Reading Group explores the life and legacy of Henrietta Lacks, whose cervical cells, taken and used without her knowledge, have played a role in modernity as we know it: from vaccines to medicine to space travel. Lacks’ story is unique but also representative of the pervasive mistreatment of Black people by institutions of medicine, science, education, and healthcare.

Special guest discussant: Ana Mari­a Lopez, MD, MPH, MACP, Professor and Vice Chair, Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Chief of Cancer Services, Jefferson Health New Jersey, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center.

Join a guided tour of Fairmount Water Works, former water-pumping station for the city of Philadelphia, and presently a hub of innovative water and watershed education programming in the region. The tour will provide an overview of the history of water systems, water treatment, and Philadelphia’s water and sewer systems. The experience will also highlight themes from the current exhibition on display at FWW: Pool: A Social History of Segregation (POOL), a multidisciplinary museum exhibition exploring the history and contemporary implications of segregated swimming in America. POOL will investigate the role of public pools in the United States, with the goal of deepening understanding of the connection between water, social justice, and public health.

Presented by Medicine+Music
(*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*).

Medicine+Music is delighted to invite all wind players, singers, as well as anyone interested in learning to maximize the effectiveness of their speech, to a workshop on the anatomy of sound production. The workshop will be given by Mr. Keith Underwood, master flutist and educator. If you plan to attend, please RSVP to Dr. Susan Rosenthal, at Susan.Rosenthal@jefferson.edu.

About the Facilitator
Keith Underwood has been an active and acclaimed flutist in New York musical life for three decades. He has appeared extensively with the New York Chamber Symphony, the Orpheus Ensemble, the Orchestra of St. Luke's, and the New York Philharmonic. Renowned as one of the most sought-after flute teachers in the world, Professor Underwood's former students play with America's major orchestras, including the Cleveland Orchestra, the Atlanta Symphony, and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. Professor Underwood is frequently asked to give master classes throughout the United States, including Julliard, Manhattan School of Music, and Eastman.

September 2021

Percussionist and Humanities visiting instructor Josh Robinson invites you to "Drum It Out!" This interactive workshop uses drumming as a coping tool, a vehicle for healthy expression and emotional release, and a fun way to connect with others in an authentic and engaging way. A pair of drumsticks will be available for pick-up leading up to the workshop. Alternatively, participants can use found objects such as wooden spoons, dowels to make noise on buckets, or trash bins.

About the facilitator: Josh Robinson is a professional percussionist, teaching artist, and drum facilitator. He has been a visiting instructor in the Humanities at Thomas Jefferson University for the past four years and the former Humanities Artist-in-Residence. For the past 19 years, Josh has used his skills, expertise, and life experience to share drumming and the many gifts it brings with thousands of people each year around the country. 

The “unusually versatile, reliably exhilarating new-music ensemble” (The New York Times) Alarm Will Sound makes its Penn Live Arts debut, returning to our city after a 12-year hiatus with the local premiere of Ten Thousand Birds by Pulitzer Prize and Grammy® Award-winning composer John Luther Adams. This experiential, open-ended collection of pieces is based on native birdsong, encompassing a range of colors and instrumentation and newly informed by actual migration patterns tracked at the Morris Arboretum. The audience roves freely around the space and the performers, experiencing the music from many perspectives as human creativity and natural phenomena blur. 

Explore the ways in which a drawing practice can bring balance to your healthcare studies or career. Artist and cardiologist Nazanin Moghbeli, MD, FACC, uses art to inspire, decompress, and deepen curiosity about the human body and medicine. Join Dr. Moghbeli for a workshop that will build on this wisdom to expand participants’ observational skills, promote self-care, and encourage burnout prevention. All drawing abilities and experiences are welcome! This workshop will discuss basic drawing techniques, composition, subject matter, three-dimensionality, and tips for forming a daily sketchbook practice.

Materials will be available for pick-up prior to the workshop, including: a small sketchbook and portable pocket version, drawing pencils, eraser, and two printed images. This workshop is open to all Jefferson faculty, staff, and students.

About the instructor: Nazanin Moghbeli, MD, FACC is an Iranian-American artist and cardiologist, and the director of the Cardiac Care Unit at Einstein Medical Center. Dr. Moghbeli is the current Humanities Artist-in-Residence.

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

Join us to discuss the importance of both hope and ambivalence as it impacts spirituality and connection in medicine. Panelists to include: Dr. Andrew Newberg, Sister Cathe Shoulberg and more!

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format. 

Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD.

In this outdoor, nature-based workshop, participants will use art, movement and mindfulness practices to anchor in purpose and meaning, set intentions for the upcoming year, connect with themselves, each other and the natural world. Facilitated by Peggy Tileston and Sondra Rosenberg.

About the Creative Approaches to Self-Care series
In order to care effectively for others, we must first learn to care for ourselves. This interdisciplinary series, led collaboratively by an arts therapist and music therapist, is designed to engage students in self-care practices that promote healthy stress management and burnout prevention. Workshops will address topics including how to cope with stress and anxiety, cultivate relaxation techniques, find balance and develop self-compassion. 

Co-presented with the Student Counseling Center (SCC). Pre-registration required. 

Presented by WHYY and the Pulse
(*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

In 1899, W. E. B. DuBois published his groundbreaking book, The Philadelphia Negro, the first sociological study of an African American community in the United States. The study would go on to shape the field of social science for decades to come. More than 100 years after its publication, racial health disparities persist, and Philadelphia is the “poorest” of the largest U.S. cities, with almost a quarter of residents living in poverty.

A growing body of research shows that social factors like housing, education and income shape the health of people in countless ways, but how has our understanding of the health of our cities changed over the last century? Join WHYY & The Pulse for a conversation about the legacy of The Philadelphia Negro and the path towards more equitable cities.

Panelists:

  • Elijah Anderson, Sterling Professor of Sociology & African American Studies - Yale University
  • Tawandaa Austin, Community Health Worker - Penn Medicine
  • Sharrelle Barber, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology & Biostatistics - Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health & Inaugural Director of the Ubuntu Center on Racism, Global Movements and Population Health Equity
  • Tayyib Smith, Co-founder - Little Giant Creative: 7th Ward Tribute

Hosted by: Sojourner Ahébée, Commonwealth Fund Health Equity Fellow - The Pulse

Introduction by: Tukufu Zuberi, Professor of Sociology - University of Pennsylvania

Support for this event, and for WHYY's coverage on health equity issues comes from the Commonwealth Fund.

Presented by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (*This is not our event! We are just spreading the word!*)

For this special Art at Noon get an inside look at the African American Museum in Philadelphia's exhibition Anna Russell Jones: The Art of Design with curator Huewayne Watson. This lecture will focus on Anna Russell Jones within the wider visual domain in the twentieth century whereby dispossessed African-descended people in the U.S. created visual cultures—invoking real and imagined lineages and ancestries—through life-long study and work in the arts.

With special guest Dr. Anna O Marley, this lecture will tie into the exhibition Women in Motion: 150 Years of Women's Artistic Networks at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

Anna Russell Jones (1902-1995), was the first African American graduate of the Philadelphia School of Design for Women, now Moore College of Art and Design, and an alumna of the anatomy department of Howard Medical School, now Howard University College of Medicine. She was known to contemporaries as a talented artist, working in wallpaper and carpet design, as a civil service illustrator, and freelance artist.

DocNights, the Jefferson Humanities & Health collaboration with Philadelphia Film Society, reboots this fall with a new programming focus: environmental justice. Join us for our first event of the year, a screening and talkback about the film Mossville: When Great Trees Fall.

About the film
Mossville, Louisiana: A once-thriving community founded by formerly enslaved and free people of color, and an economically flourishing safe haven for generations of African American families. Today it’s a breeding ground for petrochemical plants and their toxic black clouds. Many residents are forced from their homes, and those that stay suffer from prolonged exposure to contamination and pollution. Amid this chaos and injustice stands one man who refuses to abandon his family’s land - and his community.

About the Talkback
Following the screening, special guests Alexander Glustrom, Director/Editor of Mossville, and Daniel Bennett, Producer of Mossville, will join us via Zoom for a film talkback, moderated by Denine Crittendon, MPH, PhD(c), Instructor, Master of Public Health Program, Jefferson College of Population Health, Thomas Jefferson University.

August 2021

Continue the conversation about race and medicine following Professor Dorothy Roberts’ Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine lecture. Join a small-group discussion, facilitated by a Jefferson faculty member, to debrief with classmates about ways to integrate the history of race and medicine into both the present moment, and your future professional practice.

Jefferson faculty facilitators:

  • Denine Crittendon, MPH, PhD(c), Instructor, Master of Public Health Program, Jefferson College of Population Health.
  • Dimitri Papanagnou, MD, Associate Dean, Faculty Development, Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College.

Please note: These discussions will take place in-person, in the Hamilton Building on Jefferson's Center City campus. Participants will be randomly assigned to a small group and notified of the room number leading up to the event; lunch provided.

Dorothy Roberts, JD, internationally acclaimed scholar, activist, and social critic, is the 14th Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor, the George A. Weiss University Professor of Law & Sociology, and the Raymond Pace & Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights at University of Pennsylvania. Professor Dorothy Roberts has written and lectured extensively on the interplay of gender, race, and class in legal issues concerning reproduction, bioethics, and child welfare. Her latest book, Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-First Century, documents the rise of a new racial politics that relies on re-inventing the political system of race as a biological category written in our genes and obscures deepening racial inequities in a supposedly post-racial society.

Sidney Kimmel Medical College is grateful to Mr. Ed Berkowitz and his family for the generous donation that has established the Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lectureship. The Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lectureship will help engage Jefferson’s students and physicians on various areas in medical humanism, including topics that will enhance their compassion toward patients, improve their communication skills with patients, and allow for a better understanding about how to practice medicine with a patient-centered vision of delivering improved humanistic medical care.

Join us to celebrate the publication of Music as Care: Artistry in the Hospital Environment with author Sarah Adams Hoover, DMA, Associate Dean for Innovation, Interdisciplinary Partnerships and Community Initiatives, Peabody Institute, Johns Hopkins University. Music as Care provides an overview of professional musicians working within the healthcare system and explores programs that bring music into the environment of the hospital. A new resource in the field of Arts in Health, Music as Care considers what happens when musicians interact with the clinical environment as artists, and how musical careers and artistic practices can develop through work in a hospital setting. This event will also focus on the role of music and improvisation in health professions education and how the incorporation of music can promote professional development for healthcare providers, as well as patient-centered care. 

Professor Hoover will be joined in conversation by Philadelphia-area practitioners including Josh Robinson, percussionist and 2019-2021 Jefferson Humanities & Health Artist-in-Residence, and Mary Javian, Chair of Career Studies, Curtis Institute of Music. Moderated by Amanda Finegold Swain, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania, and Megan Voeller, Director of Humanities, Office of Student Life & Engagement and Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University. 

Following a presentation and panel discussion of concepts from Music as Care, attendees will be invited to join breakout groups led by the panelists for demonstrations and/or further discussion of ways to integrate music into clinical and educational settings in healthcare.

Anna Russell Jones: The Art of Design is on display at the African American Museum in Philadelphia until September 12, and Jefferson Humanities & Health has some tickets to offer to Jefferson students to use on your own time!

About the Exhibit
Anna Russell Jones: The Art of Design highlights the diverse treasures of AAMP’s permanent collection. Anna Russell Jones (1902-1995), was the first African American graduate of the Philadelphia School of Design for Women, now Moore College of Art and Design, and an alumna of the anatomy department of Howard Medical School, now Howard University College of Medicine. She was known to contemporaries as a talented artist, working in wallpaper and carpet design, as a civil service illustrator, and freelance artist.

The exhibition surveys original art and design by Jones, displaying the intricacies of the artist’s practice and highlighting significant archival materials from this rare collection; illustrating her interest in and the importance of African American history and civil rights, commitment to public service, and fascination with medical practice.

Designing Motherhood at the Mütter Museum – Student Ticket Giveaway
Reserve a free ticket by Sunday, August 8 at designing-motherhood-tix.eventbrite.com
Tickets are for Jefferson students only; supplies are limited, first come first served. Students will be contacted about how to pick up their ticket on Jefferson's Center City campus the second week of August. 

Designing Motherhood—exhibition, book, and series of public programs—is a first-of-its-kind consideration of the arc of human reproduction through the lens of design. The Designing Motherhood exhibit is currently on display at the Mütter Museum and Jefferson Humanities & Health has some tickets to offer to Jefferson students to to use on your own time!

About the Exhibit
Design impacts each step in the arc of human reproduction, from the intrauterine device that prevents the process of fertilizing an egg, to the midwife who advocates for culturally appropriate care or the breast pump flange that helps produce, gather, and store breast milk.

But who shapes these designs? Some of the objects and systems you’ll encounter in this exhibition are the product of medical knowledge that was once guarded, like the forceps, while others have been shaped by dire need and collective political will, like the at-home abortion kit and women’s health zines. Still others have been conceived by feminist engineers frustrated at the lack of innovation in designs for reproductive health, such as the twenty-first-century silicone pessary.

While being born is a universal human experience, the designs that shape it are not. Many remain taboo, rarely considered, and inaccessible to many. Designing Motherhood invites you to consider why and how we have developed designs to facilitate reproductive health, and to ponder the political, economic, and social implications of how we medicalize reproduction. These are not just women’s issues. They are human issues. They matter to us all.

July 2021

The pandemic has brought about numerous changes for all staff.  Join us for this Schwartz Center Rounds as our panelists discuss how their roles has changed over the last year and how they’ve navigated these changes amidst a pandemic.

Schwartz Center Rounds are humanism in medicine events developed by the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center to support and advance compassion in healthcare. They are named after Ken Schwartz who was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer and came to realize that what matters most during an illness is the human connection between patients and their caregivers, that “the smallest acts of kindness” made “the unbearable bearable.” These Schwartz Rounds create a forum and level playing field where providers from diverse disciplines discuss difficult emotional and social issues that arise in caring for patients. In our institution they are held monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon, formerly in a large conference room but now in a virtual format.

Presented by the Cancer Support and Welcome Center at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center; Co-facilitators: Lisa Capparella, MSS, LCSW, OSW-C and Kathleen Mechler, MD.